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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Efficacy Of An In-Vivo Chaining Procedure Compared To Pov-Vm Chaining Procedure To Teach A Task To Children With Autism, Elaine M. Turner Aug 2017

The Efficacy Of An In-Vivo Chaining Procedure Compared To Pov-Vm Chaining Procedure To Teach A Task To Children With Autism, Elaine M. Turner

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), is a neurodevelopmental disorder which includes symptoms such as repetitive or restricted patterns of behavior, and deficits in social communication (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and affects approximately 1 in 68 children (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012). Children with this disorder face unique challenges when it comes to learning academic and social skills (Gardner & Wolfe, 2013). Chaining is an effective intervention for teaching individuals with disabilities a variety of skills (Cuvo, Leaf, & Borakove, 1978; Horner & Keilitz, 1975; Shrestha, Anderson, & Moore, 2013; Tarbox, Madrid, Aguilar, Jacobo, & Schiff, 2009). Video modeling, where a subject performs a behavior they have previously seen modeled on a videotape (Nikopoulos & Keenan, 2004) and more recently point-of-view video modeling (POV-VM) which provides the instruction from the subject’s vantage point may also be effective for teaching children with autism and other disabilities needed skills (Shukla-Mehta, Miller, & Callahan, 2010). There is some empirical evidence that chaining used in conjunction with POV-VM may provide effective intervention (Jowett, Moore, & Anderson, 2012; Moore, et al., 2013; Shrestha, et al., 2013) yet no studies have directly compared a chaining procedure taught by traditional methods to a chaining procedure which is exclusively taught through the use of POV-VM.


Puzzled Representations: Popular Media And How Educators Come To Know Autism, Vanessa N. Keener Jan 2017

Puzzled Representations: Popular Media And How Educators Come To Know Autism, Vanessa N. Keener

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

People learn about the world through popular culture. Popular culture media representations of autism can be found in TV, film, literature, Internet media, advertisements, and more. This study employed a quantitative correlational design to survey 273 Georgia educators regarding their perceptions of autism, including knowledge about autism, best practices for teaching students labeled as having autism, perceived positivity and accuracy of popular media representations of autism, as well as participant identification with popular media representations of autism and personal characteristics (i.e., age, sex, level of education, type of degree, years of teaching experience, professional and personal experiences). Six major ...