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Psychology

Chronic pain

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The Moderating Effects Of Positive Religious/Spiritual Coping On Teachers’ Pain And Stress, Dawn Green Aug 2017

The Moderating Effects Of Positive Religious/Spiritual Coping On Teachers’ Pain And Stress, Dawn Green

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The objective of this internet-based survey was to investigate the effects of positive religious or spiritual coping strategies on teachers’ chronic pain reports. Teachers in the United States may represent a vulnerable group due to a high prevalence of risk factors for chronic pain conditions. Teachers have been identified to experience high stress (Johnson, et al., 2005; Kyriacou, 2001) and report poor job satisfaction (Wang, Hall, & Rahimi, 2015), which are associated with development of chronic pain conditions (Kopec & Sayre, 2004). Religious coping strategies have been associated with beneficial associations with stress and health (Reutter & Bigatti, 2014). The internet-based survey of U.S. public school teachers (N = 377) was distributed primarily through social media. Included were items related to demographic information, religious/spiritual and other coping strategies, work-related stressors and physical demands, health history, and job satisfaction. Results indicate positive religious/spiritual coping strategies moderated pain reports for teachers reporting high levels of stress; however, at lower levels of stress, positive religious/spiritual coping was associated with increased pain reports. Chronic pain was associated with higher stress, older age, lower job satisfaction, and increased physical demands for the ...