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Full-Text Articles in Education

Impact Of Workload On Service Time And Patient Safety: An Econometric Analysis Of Hospital Operations, Diwas S. Kc, Christian Terwiesch Sep 2009

Impact Of Workload On Service Time And Patient Safety: An Econometric Analysis Of Hospital Operations, Diwas S. Kc, Christian Terwiesch

Operations, Information and Decisions Papers

Much of prior work in the area of service operations management has assumed service rates to be exogenous to the level of load on the system. Using operational data from patient transport services and cardiothoracic surgery—two vastly different health-care delivery services—we show that the processing speed of service workers is influenced by the system load. We find that workers accelerate the service rate as load increases. In particular, a 10% increase in load reduces length of stay by two days for cardiothoracic surgery patients, whereas a 20% increase in the load for patient transporters reduces the transport time ...


Sex And Race Differences In Faculty Salaries, Tenure, Rank, And Productivity: Why, On Average, Do Women, African Americans, And Hispanics Have Lower Salaries, Tenure, And Rank?, Michael T. Nettles, Laura W. Perna Nov 1995

Sex And Race Differences In Faculty Salaries, Tenure, Rank, And Productivity: Why, On Average, Do Women, African Americans, And Hispanics Have Lower Salaries, Tenure, And Rank?, Michael T. Nettles, Laura W. Perna

GSE Publications

This study examined the status and conditions of salaries, tenure, rank attainment, and productivity of men and women college faculty and faculty of each of five racial groups. It is based on a subset of data on 8,114 faculty members drawn from the 1992-93 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty. The results, based on descriptive and multivariate analyses, indicate that, even after controlling for experience, education, productivity, and institutional characteristics, women received 11.3 percent lower salaries than men, had lower probabilities than men of being tenured, and were less likely than men to be full professors. While Hispanic and ...