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University of Northern Iowa

2001

Invasive plants

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

An Overview And Management Plan Of Iowa's Non-Native, Invasive, Terrestrial Forbs, Deborah Q. Lewis, Richard O. Pope Dec 2001

An Overview And Management Plan Of Iowa's Non-Native, Invasive, Terrestrial Forbs, Deborah Q. Lewis, Richard O. Pope

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Non-native, invasive forb species have been a problem in Iowa since the earliest decades of Iowa's European settlement. The history of studies of Iowa's invasive plants began with L. H. Pammel, and these studies continue to present. Three tables cite the occurrence of many of these species in the state, with Table 1 listing 93 non-native forbs reported by Pammel, Table 2 citing ten invasive forbs of natural areas, and Table 3 adding 38 observed or potential aggressive species of Iowa's anthropogenic and natural areas.

There has been a divergence of interest and research in the management ...


Exotic And Invasive Woody Plant Species In Iowa, Donald R. Farrar Dec 2001

Exotic And Invasive Woody Plant Species In Iowa, Donald R. Farrar

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Seventy species and hybrids of exotic woody trees, shrubs, and vines have naturalized in Iowa. Nearly half of these species (31) have become invasive pests in parts of the state or have potential do so. Most of the seriously invasive species are spread by bird ingestion of whole fruits. Widespread dispersal by birds hinders eradication efforts and should be considered a trait indicative of potential invasiveness. The economic and ecological values of Iowa forests are seriously compromised by exotic invasive woody species, especially where forests recovering from cropland and pasture are dominated by exotic species. Thus, a simple measure of ...