Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Northern Iowa

2001

Introduced species

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

More Than A Century Of Change In The Ames, Iowa Flora (1859-2000), William R. Norris, Mark P. Widrlechner, Deborah Q. Lewis, Jimmie D. Thompson, Richard O. Pope Dec 2001

More Than A Century Of Change In The Ames, Iowa Flora (1859-2000), William R. Norris, Mark P. Widrlechner, Deborah Q. Lewis, Jimmie D. Thompson, Richard O. Pope

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

We compared two floras compiled in Ames, Iowa: (1) an "historic" flora based on two published floras (1871, 1890) and on 1450 herbarium voucher specimens of plants collected in Ames between 1859 and 1899, and (2) a "current" flora compiled by us during recent fieldwork (1990-2000). Our goals were to determine 1) long-term changes in composition (i.e., the proportion of native species) over time, 2) long-term changes in the abundance of individual plant species over time, and 3) the extent of gains and losses of native and non-native plant species. We found that the proportion of native species declined ...


Ecological Problems With Iowa's Invasive And Introduced Fishes, Neil P. Bernstein, John R. Olson Dec 2001

Ecological Problems With Iowa's Invasive And Introduced Fishes, Neil P. Bernstein, John R. Olson

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Since the time of European settlement, at least 59 non-indigenous fish species have been introduced, reached, or moved within Iowa waters. At least 28 nonnative fish species have been introduced into, or reported from Iowa waters since settlement. Of that number, 10 are established at this time through natural reproduction. In addition, many species of native fishes have been translocated within the state, and we provide documentation for 31 of these species. Two translocated species, gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) and yellow bass (Marone mississippiensis), have had adverse impacts on Iowa's aquatic ecosystems. While many introductions are thought to be ...


Invasive Birds In Iowa: Status, Problems, And Threats, James J. Dinsmore Dec 2001

Invasive Birds In Iowa: Status, Problems, And Threats, James J. Dinsmore

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

A total of 18 invasive bird species has been introduced into or have expanded their range to include Iowa. These include ten non-North American species, one North American species that has been displaced and now is established in Iowa, and seven native species that have been released to reestablish Iowa populations. Twelve of those are regularly occurring species in Iowa, and they comprise 3.0% (12 of 404) of the species known from Iowa and 5% (10 of 199) of Iowa's nesting avifauna. These percentages are similar to those found in neighboring states. Several more species are likely to ...


Forest Invasives In Iowa: Current Problems And Future Issues, John Walkowiak, John Haanstad Dec 2001

Forest Invasives In Iowa: Current Problems And Future Issues, John Walkowiak, John Haanstad

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Iowa's forest resources of primarily deciduous trees covers over 0.8 million hectares (2 million acres) of upland and floodplain sites too steep or too wet for traditional row crop agriculture. These limited natural forests along with urban trees and shelterbelts plantings of trees are critical for environmental and economic enhancement in the state. Although not yet established in the state, exotic insects, such as gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, and pine shoot beetle, threaten native tree vitality. Established exotic diseases such as oak wilt and Dutch elm disease continue to plague the survival of Iowa's oak and ...