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Education Commons

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University of Massachusetts Amherst

Educational Administration and Supervision

Higher education

2014

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Welcome To Guyland: Experiences Of Trans* Men In College, D Chase J. Catalano May 2014

Welcome To Guyland: Experiences Of Trans* Men In College, D Chase J. Catalano

Doctoral Dissertations

Trans* identified men have emerged as a growing college and university population in higher education who have not as yet received specific research attention. I studied the experiences of trans* men in higher education and focused on their descriptions of gender identity and the advice they would offer to trans* men (or potential) trans* men about navigating college. With my focus on gender identity I hope to understand the experiences of those men who had, at one time, self-identified or been identified by others as a woman and/or female and who currently identity as man, male, masculine, or trans ...


Investing In Grindr: An Exploration Of How Gay College Men Utilize Gay-Oriented Social Networking Sites, Michael T. Dodge May 2014

Investing In Grindr: An Exploration Of How Gay College Men Utilize Gay-Oriented Social Networking Sites, Michael T. Dodge

Doctoral Dissertations

The use of social networking sites appears to be a dominant fixture in the lives of college students. Recent studies estimate that over 94% of traditionally aged college students utilize social networking sites (Matney, Borland, & Cope, 2006; Salaway, Katz, Caruso, Kvavik, & Nelson, 2007: Smith & Caruso, 2010). College students’ near universal adoption and use of social networking sites is having a significant impact on how they develop identity and interact with others (Lloyd, Dean, & Cooper, 2007; Martínez Alemán & Lynk Wartman, 2009; Torres, Jones, & Renn, 2009). Studies have explored the impact of gender differences on social networking sites’ use and how students of color utilize these sites; however, research has not examined how White, gay, male college students utilize and are impacted by social networking sites (boyd, 2007; Gasser, 2008; Hargittai, 2007; Slater, 2002).

This exploratory study fills not only a critical gap in the research regarding the experiences of White, gay, male college students’ use of gay-oriented social networking sites but of college ...