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University of Central Florida

Counseling

Working alliance

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Client Outcome: An Exploratory Investigation Of Multicultural Competence And The Working Alliance, Jessica Gonzalez Jan 2015

Client Outcome: An Exploratory Investigation Of Multicultural Competence And The Working Alliance, Jessica Gonzalez

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Early termination and low retention of clients is a common problem in counseling, with between 65%-80% of clients terminating treatment before the 10th session (Garfield, 1994; Lambert, 2013). Researchers (Lampropoulous, Schneider, & Spengler, 2009; Owen, Smith, & Rodolfa, 2009) have found that predictors of early termination include client age, race, socioeconomic status, and level of perceived distress. Furthermore, racial and ethnic minorities underutilize mental health services and have low retention when engaged in services, highlighting the need for counseling professionals to empirically explore factors that may be contributing to client engagement of the counseling process. Exploration of multicultural competence and working alliances may increase understanding of the therapeutic factors that influence client outcomes. The purpose of this research study was to investigate relationships between multicultural competence, working alliance, and client outcomes as perceived by counselors-in-training and their clients (N = 191; n = 72 counselors'-in-training, n = 119 clients). The Tripartite Model of Multicultural Counseling (Arredondo et al., 1996) was used as the primary theoretical framework in which the study is grounded. This investigation explored clients' perceptions of their counselors'-in-training ' multicultural competence as measured by the Cross-Cultural Counseling Inventory ([CCCI-R]; LaFromboise, Coleman, & Hernandez, 1991), the working alliance as measured by the Working Alliance Inventory- Short Revision ([WAI-S]; Horvath & Greenberg, 1989; Tracey & Kovocivic, 1989) and prediction on client outcome as measured by the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 ([OQ 45.2]; Lambert & Burlingame, 1996), after controlling for social desirability (as measured by the (Social Desirability Scale-Short Form [SDS; Reynolds,1982]). This investigation also examined if there were any differences in ...


The Relationship Between Self-Disclosure, Self-Efficacy, And The Supervisory Working Alliance Of Counselor Education Practicum A, David March Jan 2005

The Relationship Between Self-Disclosure, Self-Efficacy, And The Supervisory Working Alliance Of Counselor Education Practicum A, David March

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

A primary goal of clinical supervision in counselor education programs is to develop trainees who express a level of self-awareness, competence, and self-efficacy from which to further develop as a counselor. A vital component of this process is for supervisees to disclose their thoughts and feelings about their clients, their self as a person, their work as a counselor, and experiences with their supervisor. However, current research suggests that it is common for supervisees to hold back personal and professional information from their supervisor leading to missed learning and growth opportunities. Through self-disclosure, trainees receive positive and negative supervisor feedback ...