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Gender and Sexuality

African Americans

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Full-Text Articles in Education

In Search Of Progressive Black Masculinities: Critical Self-Reflections On Gender Identity Development Among Black Undergraduate Men, Keon M. Mcguire, Ph.D., Jonathan Berhanu, Charles H.F. Davis Iii, Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D. Jan 2014

In Search Of Progressive Black Masculinities: Critical Self-Reflections On Gender Identity Development Among Black Undergraduate Men, Keon M. Mcguire, Ph.D., Jonathan Berhanu, Charles H.F. Davis Iii, Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D.

Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D.

During the last several decades, research concerning the developmental trajectories, experiences, and behaviors of college men as ‘‘gendered’’ persons has emerged. In this article, we first critically review literature on Black men’s gender development and expressions within college contexts to highlight certain knowledge gaps. We then conceptualize and discuss progressive Black masculinities by relying on Mutua’s germinal work on the subject. Further, we engage Black feminist scholarship, both to firmly situate our more pressing argument for conceptual innovation and to address knowledge gaps in the literature on Black men’s gender experiences. It is our belief that scholars ...


His Experience: Toward A Phenomenological Understanding Of Academic Capital Formation Among Black And Latino Male Students, Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D., Collin D. Williams Jr., David Pérez Ii, Ph.D., Demetri L. Morgan Jan 2012

His Experience: Toward A Phenomenological Understanding Of Academic Capital Formation Among Black And Latino Male Students, Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D., Collin D. Williams Jr., David Pérez Ii, Ph.D., Demetri L. Morgan

Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D.

St. John, Hu, and Fisher (2011) define academic capital formation as “social processes that build family knowledge of educational and career options and support navigation through educational systems.” The authors suggest that particular interventions, programs, and services can equip students from lower-income backgrounds and their families with knowledge of and membership in networks that ultimately help them access colleges and universities, attain postsecondary degrees, and transition into the middle class. This chapter focuses on academic capital formation among Black and Latino male students, with a particular emphasis on giving voice to their navigational experiences along various dimensions of the St ...