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Rape Myth Acceptance: A Comparison Of Military Service Academy And Civilian Fraternity And Sorority Students, Marjorie H. Carroll, Judith Rosenstein, John D. Foubert, M. Diane Clark, Lisa Korenman Mar 2016

Rape Myth Acceptance: A Comparison Of Military Service Academy And Civilian Fraternity And Sorority Students, Marjorie H. Carroll, Judith Rosenstein, John D. Foubert, M. Diane Clark, Lisa Korenman

John D. Foubert

Although both the military and fraternities have been theorized to be characterized by
norms and attitudes that serve to legitimize violence against women, no previous work has
examined the potential similarity and differences in rape-supportive beliefs of these 2
environments or the people drawn to them. Further, the belief systems of women within
these organizations have received little attention. As such, the current study sought to serve
as an initial exploration of the rape-supportive belief systems of people drawn to these
groups. Participants were recruited from students entering 2 military service academies
(U.S. Military Academy, n 1,169, 1 ...


Predictors Of Professional Identity Development For Student Affairs Professionals., Edward C. Pittman, John D. Foubert Feb 2016

Predictors Of Professional Identity Development For Student Affairs Professionals., Edward C. Pittman, John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

This study examined whether professional involvement, supervision style, and mentoring predicted the professional identity of graduate students and new professionals in student affairs. Results of the study show that all three independent variables predicted the professional identity development of graduate students. Supervision style of a supervisor, but not mentoring or professional involvement, significantly predicted the professional identity development of new professionals. Implications and recommendations for future research and student affairs practice are provided.


Understanding The Meaning-Making Processes Of Hispanic College Students In Their Spiritual And Religious Development., Roland Nunez, John D. Foubert Dec 2015

Understanding The Meaning-Making Processes Of Hispanic College Students In Their Spiritual And Religious Development., Roland Nunez, John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

This study used narrative inquiry to understand what spirituality
and religiosity meant to Hispanic students attending a large,
Midwestern university in the United States. The study consisted
of interviews with 10 Hispanic students who discussed their
spiritual and religious beliefs from childhood through college.
Findings supported current literature that spirituality increases
and religiosity decreases during college. However, after an
initial decline in religiosity during the first year of college,
participants reported a noteworthy increase shortly after
college began. Secondly, students’ spiritual and religious beliefs
were closely tied to their family, supporting research on familial
centrality in Hispanic culture.