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Full-Text Articles in Education

Sorority Women’S And Fraternity Men’S Rape Myth Acceptance And Bystander Intervention Attitudes, R Sean Bannon, Matt W. Brosi, John D. Foubert Dec 2012

Sorority Women’S And Fraternity Men’S Rape Myth Acceptance And Bystander Intervention Attitudes, R Sean Bannon, Matt W. Brosi, John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

Sorority women and fraternity men are more likely than other students to be survivors and perpetrators of sexual assault, respectively. The present study examined sorority and fraternity members’ rape myth acceptance, bystander efficacy, and bystander willingness to help in potential sexual assault situations. Sorority women were more rejecting of rape myths and were more willing to intervene than fraternity men. However, no difference in bystander efficacy was found. Implications of this contrast are discussed.


College Training And Consulting Information, John D. Foubert Dec 2012

College Training And Consulting Information, John D. Foubert

John D. Foubert

This document describes the speaking and consulting topics that John Foubert can cover for colleges and universities.


The Relationship Between College Men’S Religious Preference And Their Level Of Moral Development., Jerry L. Tatum, John D. Foubert, Dale R. Fuqua, Christopher Ray Dec 2012

The Relationship Between College Men’S Religious Preference And Their Level Of Moral Development., Jerry L. Tatum, John D. Foubert, Dale R. Fuqua, Christopher Ray

John D. Foubert

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between first year college men's religious preference (Catholic, Protest.ant, or none) and their level of moral development as measured by the Defining Issues TestShort Form (Rest, 1986). Data analyses were conducted based upon results for 161 in-coming college men. Results of an analysis of variance indicated that those with no stated religious preference had significantly higher P scores (M = 45.2, SD= 16.8) than respondents who identified as Roman Catholic (M = 36.1, SD= J 6.7) or as Protestant (M= 38.6, SD= 17.3). Implications ...