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Full-Text Articles in Education

Addressing The Climate Change Consensus Gap Among Preservice Teachers: A Four-Faceted Approach, Grinell Smith, Colette Rabin Apr 2019

Addressing The Climate Change Consensus Gap Among Preservice Teachers: A Four-Faceted Approach, Grinell Smith, Colette Rabin

Grinell Smith

In this paper, we report an estimate of the magnitude of the “consensus gap” – the gap between what scientists know about climate change and what the general public thinks they know – about anthropomorphic climate change among K-8 pre-service teachers. We also report qualitative findings about the utility of a four-faceted approach to teaching about climate change designed explicitly to mitigate inductive reasoning errors and to reduce in-group favoritism, attribution bias, inter-group conflict, and confirmation bias. We found that learning about the scientific consensus spurred student exploration about climate change and the careful use of deliberation toward commonly-held positions within a ...


Co-Teaching Relationships To Cultivate Caring, Colette Rabin, Grinell Smith Apr 2019

Co-Teaching Relationships To Cultivate Caring, Colette Rabin, Grinell Smith

Grinell Smith

This study leveraged the implementation of co-teaching as a relational model for the teacher training practicum. When analyzed with the theoretical framework of an ethic of care, teacher-candidates and their mentor-teachers developed practices to cultivate caring classrooms through modeling. This study informs teacher preparation for caring by showing how the practicum can be drawn on to cultivate caring.


Teaching Care Ethics: Conceptual Understandings And Stories For Learning, Colette Rabin, Grinell Smith Dec 2012

Teaching Care Ethics: Conceptual Understandings And Stories For Learning, Colette Rabin, Grinell Smith

Grinell Smith

An ethic of care acknowledges the centrality of the role of caring relationships in moral education. Care ethics requires a conception of ‘care’ that differs from the quotidian use of the word. In order to teach care ethics more effectively, this article discusses four interrelated ways that teachers’ understandings of care differ from care ethics: (1) conflating the term of reference ‘care’ with its quotidian use; (2) overlooking the challenge of developing caring relationships; (3) tending toward monocultural understandings of care; and (4) separating affect and intellect. Awareness of these conceptions of care supports teacher educators to teach care ethics ...