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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Education

Phases Of Web Based Curriculum Development, William H. Robertson Feb 2005

Phases Of Web Based Curriculum Development, William H. Robertson

William H. Robertson

The Phases of Curriculum Development may be useful in helping educators facilitate this process of integrating computer technology and the Internet into classroom instruction and curriculum design. The method described is a synthesis of a personal process of discovery, teaching, and learning that has come from practical experience with teachers and students. To effectively utilize this five-phased approach, the instructor must first identify the final goal, whether it is a curriculum product, Web site, oral presentation, or some other form of demonstration of learning. Also, the basic concepts that are to be covered must be identified first and matched to ...


The Mini Golf Project, Kathleen Strub-Richards Dec 2004

The Mini Golf Project, Kathleen Strub-Richards

Kathleen A Strub-Richards

The Mini Golf Project was a collaboration between the preschoolers and the teachers at a Reggio Inspired preschool in Massachusetts. In this long term project, 3-5 year olds, and their teachers, co-constructed a viable miniature golf course.


What You Should Know To Survive In Knowledge Societies. On A Semiotic Understanding Of 'Knowledge', Michael H.G. Hoffmann Dec 2004

What You Should Know To Survive In Knowledge Societies. On A Semiotic Understanding Of 'Knowledge', Michael H.G. Hoffmann

Michael H.G. Hoffmann

Different situations - like school and workplace - demand different forms of knowledge. Even more important, in particular for lifelong learning, are forms of knowledge we need for managing movements between those situations. To develop a better understanding of how to 'navigate' knowledge boundaries, this paper analyzes, firstly, interviews with scientists interpreting familiar and unfamiliar graphs. Our goal is to identify those forms of knowledge that should receive special attention in education. Secondly, the article elaborates - based on Peirce's semiotic - an epistemologically reflected semiotic model to describe the role and conditions of knowledge.


Race, Suburban Resentment, And The Representation Of The Inner City In Contemporary Film And Television, C. Mccarthy, A. Rodriguez, S. Meacham, S. David, C. Wilson-Brown, Heriberto Godina Phd, K.E. Supriya, E. Buendia Dec 2004

Race, Suburban Resentment, And The Representation Of The Inner City In Contemporary Film And Television, C. Mccarthy, A. Rodriguez, S. Meacham, S. David, C. Wilson-Brown, Heriberto Godina Phd, K.E. Supriya, E. Buendia

Heriberto Godina PhD

No abstract provided.


Play To Win! Using Games In Library Instruction To Enhance Student Learning, Tammy Sugarman, Guy Leach Dec 2004

Play To Win! Using Games In Library Instruction To Enhance Student Learning, Tammy Sugarman, Guy Leach

Tammy Sugarman

Research has shown that educational games can have positive impacts on student learning and motivation. The success of a game played in a library instruction class depends on the type of game selected, the development of learning outcomes, and the flexibility of the librarian during class. This article explains the benefits to students and librarians of using games, discusses the development and use of a Jeopardy-style game, and provides practical tips for librarians interested in developing and incorporating games into one-time library instruction sessions.


Course Mentoring: Toward Achieving Consistency In The Curriculum, Lucia Dettori, Amber Settle Dec 2004

Course Mentoring: Toward Achieving Consistency In The Curriculum, Lucia Dettori, Amber Settle

Amber Settle

One the main challenges in achieving consistency in the curriculum is the delivery and coordination of multi-section introductory courses. The mix of adjunct, new, and seasoned instructors, the frequent changes in course content and learning goals, and the non-homogeneous student body are some of the factors that makes successfully teaching such courses a challenge. In this paper we describe how the course mentoring project combines personal involvement with a technological solution to build an effective knowledge-sharing virtual community. Course mentoring has proven to be an efficient way to address and overcome the challenges of teaching introductory computer science courses.


Spicing Up Motor Skill Performance For All, Scott M. Ronspies Dec 2004

Spicing Up Motor Skill Performance For All, Scott M. Ronspies

Scott M. Ronspies

No abstract provided.