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Selected Works

Curriculum and Instruction

2010

Interactive lecture

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

The Effect Of Teaching Methods On Examination Performance And Attitudes In An Introductory Financial Accounting Course, Joseph Marcheggiani, Karel A. Updyke, James F. Sander Nov 2010

The Effect Of Teaching Methods On Examination Performance And Attitudes In An Introductory Financial Accounting Course, Joseph Marcheggiani, Karel A. Updyke, James F. Sander

James F. Sander

This article describes a study in which a group-Socratic teaching method and an interactive lecture style were compared for their effect on students' examination performance in an introductory financial accounting course. The effect of teaching method on students' attitudes toward the accounting profession and the course was also analyzed. An ANOVA design was used to test for differences between experimental and control groups of undergraduate students. The results provide no evidence that either method of instruction results in significantly higher scores on examinations; nor was there any statistically significant difference in attitudes toward the accounting profession or the course.


The Effect Of Teaching Methods On Examination Performance And Attitudes In An Introductory Financial Accounting Course, Joseph Marcheggiani, Karel A. Updyke, James F. Sander Apr 2010

The Effect Of Teaching Methods On Examination Performance And Attitudes In An Introductory Financial Accounting Course, Joseph Marcheggiani, Karel A. Updyke, James F. Sander

Karel A. Updyke

This article describes a study in which a group-Socratic teaching method and an interactive lecture style were compared for their effect on students' examination performance in an introductory financial accounting course. The effect of teaching method on students' attitudes toward the accounting profession and the course was also analyzed. An ANOVA design was used to test for differences between experimental and control groups of undergraduate students. The results provide no evidence that either method of instruction results in significantly higher scores on examinations; nor was there any statistically significant difference in attitudes toward the accounting profession or the course.