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Full-Text Articles in Education

Evaluation Of Confidence Using Motivational Interviewing Skills Before And After In-Person Training Workshop, Jeni E. Lansing, Kathryn J. Deshaw, Maria Perez, Gregory Welk, Laura D. Ellingson Dec 2018

Evaluation Of Confidence Using Motivational Interviewing Skills Before And After In-Person Training Workshop, Jeni E. Lansing, Kathryn J. Deshaw, Maria Perez, Gregory Welk, Laura D. Ellingson

CIRTL Reports

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a skill used to help individuals make positive behavior changes and may be beneficial for those who work with undergraduate students. A new training, comprised of online content followed by an in-person workshop, was created and offered to staff members working directly with students at Iowa State University. The aim of this study was to evaluate confidence for using MI-related components pre and post an in-person workshop. To do so, participants completed a survey regarding their confidence in using MI-related skills before and after the workshop. From the survey results, a paired t-test was conducted to ...


Ace Your Online Teaching With Quality Course Delivery, Kristie Baldwin Nov 2018

Ace Your Online Teaching With Quality Course Delivery, Kristie Baldwin

Open Course Materials

The following is an instructor resource to assist educators in developing superior online courses.


Off To On: Best Practices For Online Team-Based Learning™, Michele Clark, Laura Merrick, Jennifer Styron, Annetta Dolowitz, Cassandra Dorius, Kajal Madeka, Holly Bender, Janet Johnson, John Chapman, Meghan Gillette, Michael Dorneich, Brian O'Dwyer, James Grogan, Tom Brown, Bruce Leonard, Jane Rongerude, Liz Winter Aug 2018

Off To On: Best Practices For Online Team-Based Learning™, Michele Clark, Laura Merrick, Jennifer Styron, Annetta Dolowitz, Cassandra Dorius, Kajal Madeka, Holly Bender, Janet Johnson, John Chapman, Meghan Gillette, Michael Dorneich, Brian O'Dwyer, James Grogan, Tom Brown, Bruce Leonard, Jane Rongerude, Liz Winter

Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching Publications

In the fall of 2014, 20.4 million American students were enrolled in higher education. Of these, 28% or 5.8 million students were taking at least some of their courses at a distance and half of those or nearly 3 million students were taking all of them at a distance (Allen, Seaman, Poulin, & Straut, 2016). According to the 2017 New Media Consortium Horizon Report, “online, mobile, and blended learning are foregone conclusions” (Adams Becker et al. 2017, p. 2) reflecting the growing numbers of students seeking more flexible schedules and learning environments. In addition, employers are demanding that higher ...


Thinking In Hashtags: Exploring Teenagers’ New Literacies Practices On Twitter, Benjamin W. Gleason May 2018

Thinking In Hashtags: Exploring Teenagers’ New Literacies Practices On Twitter, Benjamin W. Gleason

Education Publications

This research investigates how three high school students in the USA developed new literacies practices through their participation in teenage Twitter. Data was collected from two sources, including archival data from participants’ Twitter over a two-year span, and semi-structured interviews. Results found that teenagers developed a number of practices that facilitated orientation to cultural conventions of teenage Twitter, helped them mobilize followers for participatory events, and led to reflective awareness of how to tell stories on Twitter. This study suggests that teenagers used the affordances of Twitter in order to craft multimodal narratives that are co-constructed, participatory, nonlinear, and emergent ...


Addressing Diversity In Call Evaluation Through Arguments And Theory-Of-Action, Jim R. Ranalli Mar 2018

Addressing Diversity In Call Evaluation Through Arguments And Theory-Of-Action, Jim R. Ranalli

English Publications

THE DIVERSE AND EVER-CHANGING list of technologies encompassed by computer-assisted language learning (CALL) presents evaluators with a challenging moving target. At a time when CALL can include everything from school-based telecollaborative projects to Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), to smartphone- and tablet-based apps, previous approaches to evaluation reveal their inadequacies. The checklists that once predominated (see Susser 2001) assumed the focus of evaluation to be tutorial software known as “courseware,” which now constitutes a much-diminished part of the CALL landscape. Methodological frameworks like the one proposed by Hubbard (2006) assume the role of an instructor and a course in which ...


Innovative Implementation Of A Web-Based Rating System For Individualizing Online English Speaking Instruction, Hyejin Yang, Elena Cotos Feb 2018

Innovative Implementation Of A Web-Based Rating System For Individualizing Online English Speaking Instruction, Hyejin Yang, Elena Cotos

English Publications

The primary goal of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) in general, and of online language instruction in particular, is to create and evaluate language learning opportunities. To be effective, online language courses need to be guided by an integrated set of theoretical perspectives to second language acquisition (SLA), as well as by specific curricular goals, learning objectives and outcomes, appropriate tasks and necessary materials, and learners’ characteristics and abilities – to name a few factors that are essential in both online and face-to-face teaching (Xu & Morris, 2007). Doughty and Long (2003) articulate pedagogical principles for computer-enhanced language teaching, which highlight the importance ...


Digital Citizenship With Social Media: Participatory Practices Of Teaching And Learning In Secondary Education, Benjamin W. Gleason, Sam Von Gillern Jan 2018

Digital Citizenship With Social Media: Participatory Practices Of Teaching And Learning In Secondary Education, Benjamin W. Gleason, Sam Von Gillern

Education Publications

This article explores how social media use in formal and informal learning spaces can support the development of digital citizenship for secondary school students. As students increasingly spend large amounts of time online (e.g., an average of six hours of screen time per day, excluding school and homework), it is critical that they are developing skills enabling them to find, evaluate, and share information responsibly, engage in constructive conversation with others from diverse backgrounds, and to ensure their online participation is safe, ethical, and legal. And, yet, in spite of the importance of students learning these skills, opportunities for ...