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Full-Text Articles in Education

Integrating Language, Content, Technology, And Skills Development Through Project-Based Language Learning: Blending Frameworks For Successful Unit Planning, Tammy Slater, Gulbahar H. Beckett Feb 2019

Integrating Language, Content, Technology, And Skills Development Through Project-Based Language Learning: Blending Frameworks For Successful Unit Planning, Tammy Slater, Gulbahar H. Beckett

English Publications

In this article, the authors first summarize the literature on project-based language learning (PBLL), a sound approach to second language teaching, addressing its various benefits such as providing opportunities to develop language authentically in real-world contexts, building decision-making and problem-solving skills, and developing content knowledge. In acknowledging reports that have also suggested that students can struggle to see how language is being developed through PBLL, the authors then argue that by looking at a project as a social practice, educators can demonstrate how language, content, and 21st century skills can be taught as an integrated whole through PBLL. They describe ...


Domain Description: Validating The Interpretation Of The Toefl Ibt® Speaking Scores For International Teaching Assistant Screening And Certification Purposes, Elena Cotos, Yoo-Ree Chung Dec 2018

Domain Description: Validating The Interpretation Of The Toefl Ibt® Speaking Scores For International Teaching Assistant Screening And Certification Purposes, Elena Cotos, Yoo-Ree Chung

English Publications

In the past 2 decades, there has been an increasing tendency to use scores from the TOEFL iBT® Speaking test for decisions regarding the certification of international graduate students as teaching assistants at North American universities. To obtain validity evidence in support of the usefulness of the speaking scores for this secondary use of the test, this study adopted the argument‐based approach to validation. Focusing on the domain description inference in the TOEFL interpretive argument, the study investigated whether the language functions elicited by TOEFL iBT Speaking tasks can be identified in authentic discourse produced by international teaching assistants ...


Addressing Diversity In Call Evaluation Through Arguments And Theory-Of-Action, Jim R. Ranalli Mar 2018

Addressing Diversity In Call Evaluation Through Arguments And Theory-Of-Action, Jim R. Ranalli

English Publications

THE DIVERSE AND EVER-CHANGING list of technologies encompassed by computer-assisted language learning (CALL) presents evaluators with a challenging moving target. At a time when CALL can include everything from school-based telecollaborative projects to Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), to smartphone- and tablet-based apps, previous approaches to evaluation reveal their inadequacies. The checklists that once predominated (see Susser 2001) assumed the focus of evaluation to be tutorial software known as “courseware,” which now constitutes a much-diminished part of the CALL landscape. Methodological frameworks like the one proposed by Hubbard (2006) assume the role of an instructor and a course in which ...


Innovative Implementation Of A Web-Based Rating System For Individualizing Online English Speaking Instruction, Hyejin Yang, Elena Cotos Feb 2018

Innovative Implementation Of A Web-Based Rating System For Individualizing Online English Speaking Instruction, Hyejin Yang, Elena Cotos

English Publications

The primary goal of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) in general, and of online language instruction in particular, is to create and evaluate language learning opportunities. To be effective, online language courses need to be guided by an integrated set of theoretical perspectives to second language acquisition (SLA), as well as by specific curricular goals, learning objectives and outcomes, appropriate tasks and necessary materials, and learners’ characteristics and abilities – to name a few factors that are essential in both online and face-to-face teaching (Xu & Morris, 2007). Doughty and Long (2003) articulate pedagogical principles for computer-enhanced language teaching, which highlight the importance ...


Technology And Strategy Instruction, Jim Ranalli Feb 2018

Technology And Strategy Instruction, Jim Ranalli

English Publications

Since the 1970s, one strand of second language (L2) pedagogy has been concerned with imparting behaviors and techniques to learners that they can use independently to improve their learning and use of the target language. This strand, known as strategy instruction (SI), has faced a number of challenges including overdependence on teachers for instruction, competition for space in already crowded syllabuses, and the need to provide individualized practice and feedback on strategy use. This entry explores recent efforts to harness digital technologies in support of SI initiatives.


Inaccurate Metacognitive Monitoring And Its Effects On Metacognitive Control And Task Outcomes In Self-Regulated L2 Learning, Jim Ranalli Feb 2018

Inaccurate Metacognitive Monitoring And Its Effects On Metacognitive Control And Task Outcomes In Self-Regulated L2 Learning, Jim Ranalli

English Publications

Accurate metacognitive monitoring of one’s own knowledge or performance is a precondition for self-regulated learning; monitoring informs metacognitive control, which in turn affects task outcomes. Studies of monitoring accuracy and its connection to knowledge and performance are common in psychology and educational research but rare in instructed SLA. This paper describes two studies in which actual performance and self-evaluated performance were compared. In Study 1, 64 college-level ESL learners completed L2 vocabulary tasks that differed in complexity and familiarity. Wide discrepancies in monitoring accuracy were observed. In Study 2, the same sample was divided into two groups, and the ...


Pronunciation—Research Into Practice And Practice Into Research, John M. Levis, Ana Wu Jan 2018

Pronunciation—Research Into Practice And Practice Into Research, John M. Levis, Ana Wu

English Publications

The field of second language (L2) pronunciation is attracting researchers with many interests, as well as the teachers who have always been interested in the field. Evidence is growing that pronunciation teaching is successful at promoting greater intelligibility, and that pronunciation learning is not strongly constrained by the age at which learning takes place. The importance of pronunciation in current approaches to language means that L2 pronunciation has a strong teaching-research connection, in which teaching practices are influenced by research, and research agendas are explicitly influenced by practical questions. This growing interest is visible in the field’s dedicated conferences ...


L2-Arctic: A Non-Native English Speech Corpus, Guanlong Zhao, Sinem Sonsaat, Alif O. Silpachai, Ivana Lucic, Evgeny Chukharev-Khudilaynen, John Levis, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Jan 2018

L2-Arctic: A Non-Native English Speech Corpus, Guanlong Zhao, Sinem Sonsaat, Alif O. Silpachai, Ivana Lucic, Evgeny Chukharev-Khudilaynen, John Levis, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna

English Publications

In this paper, we introduce L2-ARCTIC, a speech corpus of non-native English that is intended for research in voice conversion, accent conversion, and mispronunciation detection. This initial release includes recordings from ten non-native speakers of English whose first languages (L1s) are Hindi, Korean, Mandarin, Spanish, and Arabic, each L1 containing recordings from one male and one female speaker. Each speaker recorded approximately one hour of read speech from the Carnegie Mellon University ARCTIC prompts, from which we generated orthographic and forced-aligned phonetic transcriptions. In addition, we manually annotated 150 utterances per speaker to identify three types of mispronunciation errors: substitutions ...


The Affordances Of Process-Tracing Technologies For Supporting L2 Writing Instruction, Jim R. Ranalli, Hui-Hsien Feng, Evgeny Chukharev-Khudilaynen Jan 2018

The Affordances Of Process-Tracing Technologies For Supporting L2 Writing Instruction, Jim R. Ranalli, Hui-Hsien Feng, Evgeny Chukharev-Khudilaynen

English Publications

The research literature on L2 writing processes contains a multitude of insights that could inform writing instruction, but writing teachers are constrained in their capacity to make use of these insights insofar as they lack detailed information about how their students’ actually engage in the processes of writing. At the same time, writing-process researchers have been using powerful technologies to trace writers’ process engagement—namely, keystroke-logging and eye-tracking—that are potentially applicable in educational settings. In this article, we describe a pilot effort to integrate these technologies into L2 writing instruction with college-level ESL students. In addition to illustrating three ...


University Students And Sustainability. Part 1: Attitudes, Perceptions, And Habits, Kurt A. Rosentrater, Brianna R. Burke Dec 2017

University Students And Sustainability. Part 1: Attitudes, Perceptions, And Habits, Kurt A. Rosentrater, Brianna R. Burke

English Publications

Increased understanding amongst scientists and the general public about anthropogenic impacts in general, and climate change in particular, behooves us as educators to adjust our courses and curricula. “Sustainability” and “green” topics are increasingly being discussed and incorporated, but this should be done with deliberation. We undertook this study to understand attitudes, perceptions, and habits of the student body at Iowa State University, with a focus on environmental knowledge and behaviors. Overall, we found that, regardless of demographic, students appear to be interested in environmental topics, reducing their footprint, and improving the environment overall. But, they did not necessarily want ...


A Move/Step Model For Methods Sections: Demonstrating Rigour And Credibility, Elena Cotos, Sarah Huffman, Stephanie Link Apr 2017

A Move/Step Model For Methods Sections: Demonstrating Rigour And Credibility, Elena Cotos, Sarah Huffman, Stephanie Link

English Publications

In the tradition of Swalesian genre theory, this manuscript explores the rhetorical composition of research article Methods sections through a top-down analysis of a corpus of nine hundred texts representative of thirty academic fields. The analysis resulted in a comprehensive cross-disciplinary model, called Demonstrating Rigour and Credibility (DRaC). The model contains three moves and sixteen steps, which are defined in terms of functional and content realizations. DRaC further served as the analytic framework for corpus annotation. Manually annotated corpus data revealed the moves and steps with high distributional prominence as well as those that are not frequent but occur consistently ...


Effects Of Ddl Technology On Genre Learning, Elena Cotos, Stephanie Link, Sarah Rebecca Huffman Jan 2017

Effects Of Ddl Technology On Genre Learning, Elena Cotos, Stephanie Link, Sarah Rebecca Huffman

English Publications

To better understand the promising effects of data-driven learning (DDL) on language learning processes and outcomes, this study explored DDL learning events enabled by the Research Writing Tutor (RWT), a web-based platform that contains: an English language corpus annotated to enhance rhetorical input; a concordancer searchable for rhetorical functions; and an automated writing evaluation engine that generates rhetorical feedback. Guided by current approaches to teaching academic writing (Lea & Street, 1998; Lillis, 2001; Swales, 2004) and by Bereiter and Scardamalia’s (1987) knowledge-telling/knowledge-transformation model, we set out to examine whether and how direct corpus uses afforded by RWT impact novice native and ...


Applying Natural Language Processing Tools To A Student Academic Writing Corpus: How Large Are Disciplinary Differences Across Science And Engineering Fields?, Scott A. Crossley, David R. Russell, Kristopher Kyle, Ute Romer Jan 2017

Applying Natural Language Processing Tools To A Student Academic Writing Corpus: How Large Are Disciplinary Differences Across Science And Engineering Fields?, Scott A. Crossley, David R. Russell, Kristopher Kyle, Ute Romer

English Publications

• Background: Researchers have been working towards better understanding differences in professional disciplinary writing (e.g., Ewer & Latorre, 1969; Hu & Cao, 2015; Hyland, 2002; Hyland & Tse, 2007) for decades. Recently, research has taken important steps towards understanding disciplinary variation in student writing. Much of this research is corpus-based and focuses on lexico-grammatical features in student writing as captured in the British Academic Written English (BAWE) corpus and the Michigan Corpus of Upper-level Student Papers (MICUSP). The present study extends this work by analyzing lexical and cohesion differences among disciplines in MICUSP. Critically, we analyze not only linguistic differences in macro-disciplines (science and engineering), but also in micro-disciplines within these macro-disciplines (biology, physics, industrial engineering, and mechanical engineering).

• Literature Review: Hardy and Römer (2013) used a multidimensional analysis to investigate linguistic differences across four macro-disciplines represented in MICUSP. Durrant (2014, in press) analyzed vocabulary in texts produced by student writers in the BAWE corpus by discipline and level (year) and disciplinary differences in lexical bundles. Ward (2007) examined lexical differences within micro-disciplines of a single discipline.

• Research Questions: The research questions that guide this study are as follows:

1. Are there significant lexical and cohesive differences between science and engineering student writing? 2. Are there significant lexical and cohesive differences between micro-disciplines within science and engineering student writing?

• Research Methodology: To address the research questions, student-produced science and engineering texts from MICUSP were analyzed with regard to lexical sophistication and textual features of cohesion. Specifically, 22 indices of lexical sophistication calculated by the Tool for the Automatic Analysis of Lexical Sophistication (TAALES; Kyle & Crossley, 2015) and 38 cohesion indices calculated by the Tool for the Automatic Analysis of Cohesion (TAACO; Crossley, Kyle, & McNamara, 2016) were used. These features were then compared both across science and engineering texts (addressing Research Question 1) and across micro-disciplines within science and engineering (biology and physics, industrial and mechanical engineering) using discriminate function analyses (DFA).

• Results: The DFAs revealed significant linguistic differences, not only between student writing in the two macro-disciplines but also between the micro-disciplines. Differences in classification accuracy based on students’ years of study hovered at about 10%. An analysis of accuracies ...


Automated Assessment Of Non-Native Learner Essays: Investigating The Role Of Linguistic Features, Sowmya Vajjala Jan 2017

Automated Assessment Of Non-Native Learner Essays: Investigating The Role Of Linguistic Features, Sowmya Vajjala

English Publications

Automatic essay scoring (AES) refers to the process of scoring free text responses to given prompts, considering human grader scores as the gold standard. Writing such essays is an essential component of many language and aptitude exams. Hence, AES became an active and established area of research, and there are many proprietary systems used in real life applications today. However, not much is known about which specific linguistic features are useful for prediction and how much of this is consistent across datasets. This article addresses that by exploring the role of various linguistic features in automatic essay scoring using two ...


A Model For Teaching Literary Analysis Using Systemic Functional Grammar, Shannon Mccrocklin, Tammy Slater Jan 2017

A Model For Teaching Literary Analysis Using Systemic Functional Grammar, Shannon Mccrocklin, Tammy Slater

English Publications

This article introduces an approach that middle-school teachers can follow to help their students carry out linguistic-based literary analyses. As an example, it draws on Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) to show how J.K. Rowling used language to characterize Hermione as an intelligent female in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Using a simplified SFG analysis, the authors show how teachers can help students find and use language data that can support their intuition about characters or can uncover other patterns in the text. This type of SFG analysis approach can be particularly useful for English language learners and struggling ...


Challenging Heteronormativity: Raising Lgbtq Awareness In A High School English Language Arts Classroom, Brianna R. Burke, Kristina Greenfield Jul 2016

Challenging Heteronormativity: Raising Lgbtq Awareness In A High School English Language Arts Classroom, Brianna R. Burke, Kristina Greenfield

English Publications

This article details a unit designed for a high school English classroom to address social injustice and the silencing of LGBTQ individuals.


Patterns Of Tasks, Patterns Of Talk: L2 Literacy Building In University Spanish Classes, Jesse Gleason, Tammy Slater Jun 2016

Patterns Of Tasks, Patterns Of Talk: L2 Literacy Building In University Spanish Classes, Jesse Gleason, Tammy Slater

English Publications

ABSTRACT

Second language (L2) classroom research has sought to shed light on the processes and practices that develop L2 learners’ abilities [Nunan, D. 2004. Task-based language teaching. London: Continuum; Verplaetse, L. 2014. Using big questions to apprentice students into language-rich classroom practices. TESOL Quarterly, 179, 632–641; Zeungler, J., & Mori, J. 2002. Microanalyses of classroom discourse: A critical consideration of method. Applied Linguistics, 23(3), 283–288]. Honing in on the micro-level of classroom tasks and even further into the language of the tasks can help to reveal the patterns in teacher- and student-talk that help scaffold students’ academic literacy. Literacy, from a systemic functional view of language learning, entails having the tools to function in the social contexts that are valued in students’ lives. This ...


Effects Of Strength Of Accent On An L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test, Gary Ockey, Spiros Papageorgiou, Robert French Apr 2016

Effects Of Strength Of Accent On An L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test, Gary Ockey, Spiros Papageorgiou, Robert French

English Publications

This article reports on a study which aimed to determine the effect of strength of accent on listening comprehension of interactive lectures. Test takers (N = 21,726) listened to an interactive lecture given by one of nine speakers and responded to six comprehension items. The test taker responses were analyzed with the Rasch computer program WINSTEPS to investigate the relative difficulty of the items associated with the nine versions of the interactive lectures. Results indicated that comprehension of interactive lectures was diminished with quite light accents, as has been found with monologic lectures.


Automated Writing Evaluation For Formative Assessment Of Second Language Writing: Investigating The Accuracy And Usefulness Of Feedback As Part Of Argument-Based Validation, Jim Ranalli, Stephanie Link, Evgeny Chukharev-Hudilainen Feb 2016

Automated Writing Evaluation For Formative Assessment Of Second Language Writing: Investigating The Accuracy And Usefulness Of Feedback As Part Of Argument-Based Validation, Jim Ranalli, Stephanie Link, Evgeny Chukharev-Hudilainen

English Publications

An increasing number of studies on the use of tools for automated writing evaluation (AWE) in writing classrooms suggest growing interest in their potential for formative assessment. As with all assessments, these applications should be validated in terms of their intended interpretations and uses. A recent argument-based validation framework outlined inferences that require backing to support integration of one AWE tool, Criterion, into a college-level English as a Second Language (ESL) writing course. The present research appraised evidence for the assumptions underlying two inferences in this argument. In the first of two studies, we assessed evidence for the evaluation inference ...


Connecting Criterion Scores And Classroom Grading Contexts: A Systemic Functional Linguistic Model For Teaching And Assessing Causal Language, Hong Ma, Tammy Slater Jan 2016

Connecting Criterion Scores And Classroom Grading Contexts: A Systemic Functional Linguistic Model For Teaching And Assessing Causal Language, Hong Ma, Tammy Slater

English Publications

This study utilized theory proposed by Mohan, Slater, Luo, and Jaipal (2002) regarding what they refer to as the Developmental Path of Cause to examine issues of AWE score use in classroom contexts. Utilization of this model enabled this study to investigate the accuracy of the AWE scores by comparing them to ratings based on teachers’ intuition as well as to scores generated based on existing rubrics. The qualitative data collected from focus group interviews of three experienced teachers’ justifications for their intuitive evaluations of essays suggested that the Developmental Path of Cause helped teachers articulate their intuitions, identifying the ...


The Effectiveness Of Computer-Based Spaced Repetition In Foreign Language Vocabulary Instruction: A Double-Blind Study, Evgeny Chukharev-Hudilainen, Tatiana A. Klepikova Jan 2016

The Effectiveness Of Computer-Based Spaced Repetition In Foreign Language Vocabulary Instruction: A Double-Blind Study, Evgeny Chukharev-Hudilainen, Tatiana A. Klepikova

English Publications

The purpose of the present paper is twofold; first, we present an empirical study evaluating the effectiveness of a novel CALL tool for foreign language vocabulary instruction based on spaced repetition of target vocabulary items. The study demonstrates that by spending an average of three minutes each day on automatically generated vocabulary activities, EFL students increased their long-term vocabulary retention rate three fold. Second, we demonstrate that the double-blind experiment design, which has become standard research practice in such extremely high-stakes fields as pharmacology and healthcare, has the potential of being successfully implemented in CALL research.


Adding Quantitative Corpus-Driven Analysis To Qualitative Discourse Analysis: Determining The Aboutness Of Writing Center Talk, Jo Mackiewicz, Isabelle Thompson Jan 2016

Adding Quantitative Corpus-Driven Analysis To Qualitative Discourse Analysis: Determining The Aboutness Of Writing Center Talk, Jo Mackiewicz, Isabelle Thompson

English Publications

We discuss the benefits of using corpus linguistic analysis, a quantita- tive method for determining the "aboutness" of talk, in conjunction with discourse analysis in order to understand writing center talk at a micro- and macrolevel. We exemplify this mixed-method approach by examining a specialized corpus of 20 writing center conferences totaling more than 75,000 words. Our analysis also uncovered words that differentiated writing center talk from reference corpora and thus helped reveal the aboutness of the writing center talk. For example, student writers said "I don't know" far more frequently than any other 4-gram, and tutors said ...


The Design Of An Instrument To Evaluate Sotware For Efl/Esl Pronunciation Teaching, John Levis, Cristiana Gomes De Fretias Menezes Martins, Vladia Maria Cabral Borges Jan 2016

The Design Of An Instrument To Evaluate Sotware For Efl/Esl Pronunciation Teaching, John Levis, Cristiana Gomes De Fretias Menezes Martins, Vladia Maria Cabral Borges

English Publications

This study aimed at designing an instrument composed of 72 questions that evaluate the extent to which sotware programs teach pronunciation of English as a Foreign Language and/or Second Language (EFL/ESL) following the principles of the Communicative Approach (Celce-Murcia et al, 2010). he designed instrument was tested for reliability and validity. For this purpose, 46 EFL/ESL teachers used the instrument to analyze an online version of the sotware program Pronunciation Power 2. he participants’ answers to the questions were subjected to reliability and validity tests. he results of these statistical tests suggest the instrument is potentially valid ...


20 Years Of Technology And Language Assessment, Carol Chapelle, Erik Voss Jan 2016

20 Years Of Technology And Language Assessment, Carol Chapelle, Erik Voss

English Publications

This review article provides an analysis of the research from the last two decades on the theme of technology and second language assessment. Based on an examination of the assessment scholarship published in Language Learning & Technology since its launch in 1997, we analyzed the review articles, research articles, book reviews, and commentaries as developing one of two primary thrusts of research on technology and language assessment: technology for efficiency and technology for innovation.


Syntactic Complexity Of Efl Chinese Students’ Writing, Sue Wang, Tammy Slater Jan 2016

Syntactic Complexity Of Efl Chinese Students’ Writing, Sue Wang, Tammy Slater

English Publications

Syntactic complexity as an indicator in the study of English learners’ language proficiency has been frequently employed in language development assessment. Using the Syntactic Complexity Analyzer, developed by Lu (2010), this article collected data representing the syntactic complexity indexes from the writing of Chinese non-English major students and from the writing of proficient users of English on a similar task. The results indicate that there is a significant difference in the use of complex nominals, the mean length of sentences, and the mean length of clauses between the writings of EFL Chinese students and more proficient users. This study provides ...


Learning To Use Systemic Functional Grammar To Teach Literary Analysis: Views On The Effectiveness Of A Short Professional Development Workshop, Tammy Slater, Shannon Mccrocklin Jan 2016

Learning To Use Systemic Functional Grammar To Teach Literary Analysis: Views On The Effectiveness Of A Short Professional Development Workshop, Tammy Slater, Shannon Mccrocklin

English Publications

As students’ academic language ability grows, they are expected to move from summarizing or retelling works of literature to studying texts critically. With this comes the demand for more developed literacy skills or, as those working from a systemic functional linguistic perspective would argue, an increase in the students’ resources for making meaning in an ever-widening variety of contexts (Derewianka, 2001). English language arts (ELA) teachers in the United States today are challenged with the task of developing this literacy to meet Common Core State Standards (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers ...


Oral Academic Discourse Socialization Of An Esl Chinese Student: Cohesive Device Use, Sue Wang, Tammy Slater Jan 2016

Oral Academic Discourse Socialization Of An Esl Chinese Student: Cohesive Device Use, Sue Wang, Tammy Slater

English Publications

Framed in language socialization theory, this study examines the longitudinal cohesive device development of an ESL Chinese graduate student over time during his discourse socialization by focusing on his oral presentations through a systemic functional linguistics approach. The study found that the participant improved in his use of textual resources as he continued his discourse socialization in the academic community that he had joined. Yet the problems and challenges the participant faced during his development of cohesive devices also illustrated the complexity and non-linear characteristics of academic discourse socialization. The study contributes to language socialization research by employing a systemic ...


The Risk Takers: The Support Faculty Participants In Integration Initiatives Say They Really Need, Denise A. Vrchota Jan 2016

The Risk Takers: The Support Faculty Participants In Integration Initiatives Say They Really Need, Denise A. Vrchota

English Publications

This qualitative study reports the concerns of faculty in three pre-professional programs of one food science department as they integrate communication competencies into their classes. The study found that faculty viewed communication activities through the lenses of their disciplinary traditions, applying scientific frames of reference to communication activities. Two areas of concern that emerged are: first, faculty were challenged by logistical issues such as development assessment instruments and assignments; second the risks they took by teaching an area outside of their disciplinary expertise caused them anxieties. Agents of integration and other participants must be cognizant of the disciplinary frames of ...


Pronunciation Materials, John Levis, Sinem Sonsaat Jan 2016

Pronunciation Materials, John Levis, Sinem Sonsaat

English Publications

Pronunciation is increasingly popular in professional conferences where sessions are often filled to overflowing. Similarly, pronunciation materials today show up in a wide variety of sources. Baker and Murphy (2011) tell us that “the past decade has witnessed an explosion in the number of … classroom textbooks; teacher’s manuals; classroom-based research reports; teacher-training books; book chapters; journal articles; CD-ROMs; videos, computer software; Internet resources, most of which are geared directly toward ESL/EFL teachers” (p. 37). This explosion means that research into pronunciation materials needs to be based on sound research and best practices. Grant (1995) provided an early look ...


Computer-Assisted Research Writing In The Disciplines, Elena Cotos Jan 2016

Computer-Assisted Research Writing In The Disciplines, Elena Cotos

English Publications

It is arguably very important for students to acquire writing skills from kindergarten through high school. In college, students must further develop their writing in order to successfully continue on to graduate school. Moreover, they have to be able to write good theses, dissertations, conference papers, journal manuscripts, and other research genres to obtain their graduate degree. However, opportunities to develop research writing skills are often limited to traditional student-advisor discussions (Pearson & Brew, 2002). Part of the problem is that graduate students are expected to be good at such writing because if they “can think well, they can write well ...