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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Development Of The Infews-Er: A Virtual Resource Center For Transdisciplinary Graduate Student Training At The Nexus Of Food, Energy, And Water, Luis F. Rodríguez, Anna-Maria Marshall, Dan Cotton, Richard Koelsch, Jacek A. Koziel, Deanne Meyer, Dan Steward, Jill Heemstra, Anand Padmanabahn, John Classen, Nathan J. Meyer, Benjamin L. Ruddell, Sean M. Ryan, Ximing Cai, Emad Habib, Peter D. Saundry Apr 2019

The Development Of The Infews-Er: A Virtual Resource Center For Transdisciplinary Graduate Student Training At The Nexus Of Food, Energy, And Water, Luis F. Rodríguez, Anna-Maria Marshall, Dan Cotton, Richard Koelsch, Jacek A. Koziel, Deanne Meyer, Dan Steward, Jill Heemstra, Anand Padmanabahn, John Classen, Nathan J. Meyer, Benjamin L. Ruddell, Sean M. Ryan, Ximing Cai, Emad Habib, Peter D. Saundry

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Problems at the nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (FEWS) are among the most complex challenges we face. Spanning simple to complex temporal, geographic, social, and political framings, the questions raised at this nexus require multidisciplinary if not transdisciplinary approaches. Answers to these questions must draw from engineering, the physical and biological sciences, and the social sciences. Practical solutions depend upon a wide community of stakeholders, including industry, policymakers, and the general public. Yet there are many obstacles to working in a transdisciplinary environment: unfamiliar concepts, specialized terminology, and countless “blind” spots. Graduate education occurs in disciplinary ‘silos', often ...


Student Perspectives On A New Online Biomass Production Module For Fundamentals Of Biorenewable Resources And Technology, Darren H. Jarboe, D. Raj Raman, Thomas J. Brumm, Robert A. Martin, Scott Mcleod Mar 2016

Student Perspectives On A New Online Biomass Production Module For Fundamentals Of Biorenewable Resources And Technology, Darren H. Jarboe, D. Raj Raman, Thomas J. Brumm, Robert A. Martin, Scott Mcleod

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

In 2007, a Virtual Education Center for Biorenewable Resources was initiated that offered three online courses, one being Biorenewable Resources and Tech¬nology (BRT) 501 – Fundamentals of BRT. The objective was to assess student perceptions on two delivery methods, course assessments, module material, and student learning. Twenty students completed the survey of qualitative aspects of student experiences in BRT 501. The biomass production module brought non-farm students closer to the knowledge level of farm students as demonstrated by students’ self-assessed knowl¬edge and their BRT 501 assessment scores. Students desired a stronger connection with the course instructor and peers, whether ...


Differential Impacts Of Online Delivery Methods On Student Learning: A Case Study In Biorenewables, Darren H. Jarboe, D. Raj Raman, Thomas J. Brumm, Robert Martin, Scott Mcleod Mar 2016

Differential Impacts Of Online Delivery Methods On Student Learning: A Case Study In Biorenewables, Darren H. Jarboe, D. Raj Raman, Thomas J. Brumm, Robert Martin, Scott Mcleod

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

In 2007, a Virtual Education Center for Biorenewable Resources was initiated that offered three distance education courses, one being Biorenewable Resources and Technology (BRT) 501 – Fundamentals of Biorenewable Resources and Technology, the subject of this study. The primary objective was to determine if course delivery method (video lecture format and the other in menu-driven auto-tutorial presentations (MDAP) deliv¬ered via Flash format), student major (agricultural and non-agricultural), and gender influence online student learning in BRT 501. We found that BRT 501 student performance was not significantly impacted by module delivery method. Students with agricultural majors were outperformed by students with ...


Pre-Enrollment Identification Of At-Risk Students In A Large Engineering College, Amy L. Kaleita, Gregory R. Forbes, Ekaterina Ralston, Jonathan I. Compton, Darin Wohlgemuth, D. Raj Raman Jan 2016

Pre-Enrollment Identification Of At-Risk Students In A Large Engineering College, Amy L. Kaleita, Gregory R. Forbes, Ekaterina Ralston, Jonathan I. Compton, Darin Wohlgemuth, D. Raj Raman

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Historical data from multiple institutions show that students who achieve a first-semester grade point average (GPA) below 2.0 are at substantially greater risk of leaving engineering programs before graduating with a degree than are those who achieved above 2.0. Identifying these ‘‘at risk’’ students prior to the start of their first semester could enable improved strategies to enhance their academic success and likelihood of graduation. This study used two distinct modeling approaches to predict first-term GPA group (low-risk: GPA > 2.0; at-risk: GPA < 2.0) based upon data available prior to the student’s first pre-enrollment advising session. In the case of one of the approaches—which allowed a differential weighting of Type I to Type II errors—we explore how these weightings influences the prediction accuracy. The models used academic and demographic data for first-year engineering students from 2010 to 2012 from a single large public research-active institution. The two model types employed to build predictive models were (1) ordinary least squares multiple linear regression (MLR), and (2) classification and regression trees (CART). For both MLR and CART models, high school GPA and math placement exam scores were found to be significant predictors of first-term GPA. Increasing the cost of missing at-risk students in the CART models improves at-risk prediction accuracy but also increases the rate of false positives (incorrectly identifying a low-risk student as at-risk). The relative simplicity of the CART models, as well as the ease with which error-types can be weighted to reflect institutional values, encourages their use in this type of modeling effort.


Holistic Student Professional Development And Assessment: A Backward Design Approach, Jacqulyn A. Baughman, Thomas J. Brumm, Steven K. Mickelson Apr 2014

Holistic Student Professional Development And Assessment: A Backward Design Approach, Jacqulyn A. Baughman, Thomas J. Brumm, Steven K. Mickelson

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

No abstract provided.


Under The Asabe Umbrella — Engineering Degree Programs Need Curriculum Reform, D. Raj Raman, Amy L. Kaleita Jan 2014

Under The Asabe Umbrella — Engineering Degree Programs Need Curriculum Reform, D. Raj Raman, Amy L. Kaleita

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

The first-ever issue of Transactions of the ASAE, published in 1907, opens with a talk given by Howard W. Riley (after whom Riley-Robb Hall at Cornell University would later be named) that's modestly titled "The Courses in Agricultural Engineering that Should be Offered." Responses from several other luminaries, including J. B. Davidson (after whom Davidson Hall at Iowa State University would later be named), are included and make for fascinating reading for any student or practitioner of our discipline.


Landlabs: An Integrated Approach To Creating Agricultural Enterprises That Meet The Triple Botom Line, Nicholas Jordan, Lisa A. Schulte, Carol Williams, David Mulla, David Pitt, Carissa Shively Slotterback, Randall Jackson, Douglas Landis, Bruce Dale, Dennis Becker, Mark Rickenbach, Matt Helmers, V. Bobby Bringi Dec 2013

Landlabs: An Integrated Approach To Creating Agricultural Enterprises That Meet The Triple Botom Line, Nicholas Jordan, Lisa A. Schulte, Carol Williams, David Mulla, David Pitt, Carissa Shively Slotterback, Randall Jackson, Douglas Landis, Bruce Dale, Dennis Becker, Mark Rickenbach, Matt Helmers, V. Bobby Bringi

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Global demand is increasing for food, feed, and fiber; for additional agricultural outputs, such as biofuels; and for ecosystem services, such as clean water and outdoor recreation. In response, new agricultural enterprises are needed that produce more outputs from existing lands while meeting the "triple bottom line" of high performance in economic, environmental, and social terms. Establishing such enterprises requires coordination and development within three critical domains: landscape configurations (i.e., types and arrangements of land uses), supply/value chains (i.e., processing and utilization), and policy and governance. In this essay, we describe our efforts, as land-grant university scientists ...


Why They Leave: Understanding Student Attrition From Engineering Majors, Brandi N. Geisinger, D. Raj Raman Jan 2013

Why They Leave: Understanding Student Attrition From Engineering Majors, Brandi N. Geisinger, D. Raj Raman

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

A large number of students leave engineering majors prior to graduation despite efforts to increase retention rates. To improve retention rates in engineering programs, the reasons why students leave engineering must be determined. In this paper, we review the literature on attrition from engineering programs to identify the breadth of factors that contribute to students’ decisions to leave. Fifty studies on student attrition from engineering programs were included in the primary part of this literature review. In the second half of the work, an additional twenty-five studies that focused on methods of increasing student retention, were examined. Six broad factors ...


Virtual Education Center For Biorenewable Resources: Humanizing Distance Education, Brandi N. Geisinger, D. Raj Raman, Karri M. Haen, Mari R. Kemis, Michael L. Pate Dec 2012

Virtual Education Center For Biorenewable Resources: Humanizing Distance Education, Brandi N. Geisinger, D. Raj Raman, Karri M. Haen, Mari R. Kemis, Michael L. Pate

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Despite the obstacles to traditional distance education courses, distance education and social learning theorists suggest effective distance education courses can be developed. For this study, we designed a new distance education course model and attempted to 1) Test the effectiveness of the virtual education center model, understood through the lens of social learning and distance education theories; 2) Discuss potential improvements to the model; and 3) Build upon distance education and social learning theories. To achieve these goals, distance education courses were offered using the new model. Participating faculty and graduate assistants responded to a survey asking about their experiences ...


Learning And Retention Of Chemical Safety Training Information: A Comparison Of Classroom Versus Computer-Based Formats On A College Campus, James H. Withers, Steven A. Freeman, Eunice Kim Sep 2012

Learning And Retention Of Chemical Safety Training Information: A Comparison Of Classroom Versus Computer-Based Formats On A College Campus, James H. Withers, Steven A. Freeman, Eunice Kim

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Safety training is an important part of every safety professional's daily practice. Evaluation of the effectiveness of safety training is especially critical. A research study was undertaken that first explores the basics of devising an effective safety training module. The literature related to the key issues of amount of learning and retention is reviewed and tested in the context of a site-specific chemical safety training course that is offered both in the classroom and on the computer. The importance of evaluating characteristics of the learner is discussed and evaluated. Finally, important variables related to assessment technique (i.e., how ...


Tips For Communicating Agricultural Safety To Children, Charles V. Schwab, Laura L. Miller, Lynn M. Graham Jun 2006

Tips For Communicating Agricultural Safety To Children, Charles V. Schwab, Laura L. Miller, Lynn M. Graham

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Effectively communicating agricultural safety messages to children requires an understanding of this audience's unique characteristics, which are dependent upon their developmental stages. This article identifies important characteristics for the 4-7 and 8-12 age groups that were used in developing educational resources for children who participate in farm safety day camps and in-school programs. Each age group has specific characteristics that can inhibit communication when they are not considered in designing content and approach of educational materials. In addition, there are three comprehensive communication issues that affect the effectiveness of transferring safety messages to children.