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Grand Valley State University

Peer Reviewed Articles

2015

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Replicable Interprofessional Competency Outcomes From High-Volume, Inter-Institutional, Interprofessional Simulation, Deborah Bambini, Matthew Emery, Margaret De Voest, Lisa Meny, Michael J. Shoemaker Oct 2015

Replicable Interprofessional Competency Outcomes From High-Volume, Inter-Institutional, Interprofessional Simulation, Deborah Bambini, Matthew Emery, Margaret De Voest, Lisa Meny, Michael J. Shoemaker

Peer Reviewed Articles

There are significant limitations among the few prior studies that have examined the development and implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) experiences to accommodate a high volume of students from several disciplines and from different institutions. The present study addressed these gaps by seeking to determine the extent to which a single, large, inter-institutional, and IPE simulation event improves student perceptions of the importance and relevance of IPE and simulation as a learning modality, whether there is a difference in students’ perceptions among disciplines, and whether the results are reproducible. A total of 290 medical, nursing, pharmacy, and physical therapy students ...


Creating A Cycle Of Continuous Improvement Through Instructional Rounds, Catherine L. Meyer-Looze Apr 2015

Creating A Cycle Of Continuous Improvement Through Instructional Rounds, Catherine L. Meyer-Looze

Peer Reviewed Articles

Instructional Rounds is a continuous improvement strategy that focuses on the technical core of educational systems as well as educators collaborating side-by-side. Concentrating on collective learning, this process only makes sense within an overall strategy of improvement. This case study examined the Instructional Rounds process in a northern Michigan school district. Pressure points identified included a culture of distrust, an unclear definition of learner outcomes and effective teaching, and a status quo view of improvement. Supportive strategies for change were identified and continue to be implemented as part of the district’s continuous improvement strategy