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Full-Text Articles in Education

Raising The Curtain: Investigating The Practicum Experiences Of Pre-Service Drama Teachers, Christina C. Gray, Peter R. Wright, Robin Pascoe Jan 2017

Raising The Curtain: Investigating The Practicum Experiences Of Pre-Service Drama Teachers, Christina C. Gray, Peter R. Wright, Robin Pascoe

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

The practicum is internationally recognised as a valuable component of teacher education. It is an opportunity for pre-service teachers to develop teaching skills in authentic ways and pursue professional inquiry into practice. While extensive research has been conducted into the practicum generally, little research focuses on the practicum experience for pre-service drama teachers. This article, investigates the preparation of drama teachers for the profession with a particular focus on the practicum component of pre-service education. Drawing on the experiences of 19 pre-service drama teachers from a Western Australian university, focus-groups were conducted in order to scope the key components of ...


Co-Operating Teachers, School Placement And The Implications For Quality, Carmel G. Roofe, Loraine D. Cook Jan 2017

Co-Operating Teachers, School Placement And The Implications For Quality, Carmel G. Roofe, Loraine D. Cook

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

It is widely understood by teacher educators and administrators responsible for the practicum of student teachers that co-operating teachers play a critical role in student teacher development. This research sought to examine student teachers perception of their co-operating teachers during practicum and ascertain the extent to which subject specialisation, gender and school placement influenced their perception. Through the use of a questionnaire, data were collected from 195 student teachers during the final week of their practicum. The results indicated that student teachers had a positive perception of their co-operating teachers and perceived their co-operating teachers to be providing developmental and ...


“I Learned Quite A Lot Of The Maths Stuff Now That I Think Of It”: Māori Medium Students Reflecting On Their Initial Teacher Education, Ngārewa Hāwera, Merilyn Taylor Jan 2017

“I Learned Quite A Lot Of The Maths Stuff Now That I Think Of It”: Māori Medium Students Reflecting On Their Initial Teacher Education, Ngārewa Hāwera, Merilyn Taylor

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Research involving preservice or initial teacher education (ITE) indicates that mathematics education is a vital component of study. Little is known however, of indigenous student views of their compulsory mathematics education courses for a teaching degree. This research contributes to that knowledge space as it explores Māori medium ITE students’ perceptions of mathematics education in Aotearoa New Zealand. A thematic and qualitative analysis of a focused group discussion provides insights into key factors that students reported as significant links between their university and practicum experiences (teaching practice in schools). Some suggestions for strengthening that programme were also expressed. Findings indicate ...


From Swan To Ugly Duckling? Mentoring Dynamics And Preservice Teachers’ Readiness To Teach, Mahsa Izadinia Jan 2017

From Swan To Ugly Duckling? Mentoring Dynamics And Preservice Teachers’ Readiness To Teach, Mahsa Izadinia

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

This study focuses on two preservice teachers who experienced significantly different mentoring relationships in their two placements during a one-year teaching degree in a university in Western Australia. Data were collected through three rounds of semi-structured interviews, reflective journals and classroom observations. The findings indicated that mentor teachers’ mentoring styles considerably informed the preservice teachers’ perceptions of themselves as teachers and facilitated or inhibited their professional development. Implications for practice include teacher education programs invest more time and rigour in selecting and preparing mentors for their crucial role.