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Full-Text Articles in Education

Prisoner Education And Training, And Other Characteristics: Western Australia, July 2005 To June 2010, Margaret Giles, Jacqui Whale Jan 2013

Prisoner Education And Training, And Other Characteristics: Western Australia, July 2005 To June 2010, Margaret Giles, Jacqui Whale

ECU Publications 2011

Executive summary

Spending public funds on educating and training prisoners can generate a significant return on investment, because as this report argues, studying in prison can reduce costly recidivism and improve life outcomes for ex-prisoners. What are the costs of recidivism? Let’s start with incarceration. Prisoners cost money - about $110,000 per prisoner a year. With over 4,000 prisoners in WA prisons at any one time and a turnover of 8,000 prisoners per year, incarceration is a costly business. In addition, there are policing and legal costs related to finding, charging and sentencing alleged offenders; as well ...


Excessive Internet Use Among European Children, David Smahel, Ellen Helsper, Lelia Green, Veronika Kalmus, Lukas Blinka, Kjartan Olafsson Jan 2012

Excessive Internet Use Among European Children, David Smahel, Ellen Helsper, Lelia Green, Veronika Kalmus, Lukas Blinka, Kjartan Olafsson

ECU Publications 2011

This report presents new findings and further analysis of the EU Kids Online 25-country survey regarding excessive use of the internet by children. It shows that while a number of children (29%) experienced one or more of the five components associated with excessive internet use, very few (1%) can be said to show pathological levels of use.


Learning Through Standard English: Cognitive Implications For Post-Pidgin/-Creole Speakers, Ian Malcolm Jan 2011

Learning Through Standard English: Cognitive Implications For Post-Pidgin/-Creole Speakers, Ian Malcolm

ECU Publications 2011

Despite their (albeit limited) access to Standard Australian English through education, Australian Indigenous communities have maintained their own dialect (Aboriginal English) for intragroup communication and are increasingly using it as a medium of cultural expression in the wider community. Most linguists agree that the most significant early ancestor of Aboriginal English is New South Wales Pidgin, which developed in the first decades after the European occupation of Australia in 1788. Influence of present or past Aboriginal languages can be traced in Aboriginal English both directly and by way of NSW Pidgin and other contact varieties. Recent work in Western Australia ...