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Full-Text Articles in Education

Parental Involvement And Other Parental And School-Related Predictors Of Academically Successful Students, Mark Williams May 2018

Parental Involvement And Other Parental And School-Related Predictors Of Academically Successful Students, Mark Williams

Electronic Theses & Dissertations Collection for Atlanta University & Clark Atlanta University

Schools have defined parental involvement as parent reported participation at least once during the school year. Participation can consist of attending a school meeting, parent/teacher conference, school event or volunteering in the school. Researchers have spent countless hours researching parental involvement and its impact on academic success for students. Researchers have conducted studies using two-parent households, single-parent households and studies comparing single-parent households to two-parent households. A majority of the studies had favorable outcomes for two-parent households and not so favorable outcomes for single-parent households. Especially, if those households were headed by a single African American female.

During the ...


A Case Study Examining The Influence Of Youth Culture And College Experience On Student Persistence Among Underserved African-American Students, Sonya M. Okoli May 2016

A Case Study Examining The Influence Of Youth Culture And College Experience On Student Persistence Among Underserved African-American Students, Sonya M. Okoli

Electronic Theses & Dissertations Collection for Atlanta University & Clark Atlanta University

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how youth culture influences the attitudes and motivations of African-American junior college students who have aspirations to complete postsecondary credentials to advance their socioeconomic status but do not persist. In this study, youth culture was defined as the values, norms, and practices shared by African-American youth between the ages of 18-24, indicative of the way they chose to live life and make decisions. The independent variables were Academic Self-Concept, Student Educational Experience, College Bridge Programs, Academic Advisement, Faculty Involvement and Interaction, Extracurricular Activities, Youth Culture, Family Support, Socioeconomic Status ...


A Case Study Examining The Influence Of Youth Culture And College Experience On Student Persistence Among Underserved African- American Students, Sonya S. Okoli May 2016

A Case Study Examining The Influence Of Youth Culture And College Experience On Student Persistence Among Underserved African- American Students, Sonya S. Okoli

ETD Collection for AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library

The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how youth culture influences the attitudes and motivations of African-American junior college students who have aspirations to complete postsecondary credentials to advance their socioeconomic status but do not persist. In this study, youth culture was defined as the values, norms, and practices shared by African-American youth between the ages of 18-24, indicative of the way they chose to live life and make decisions. The independent variables were Academic Self-Concept, Student Educational Experience, College Bridge Programs, Academic Advisement, Faculty Involvement and Interaction, Extracurricular Activities,

Youth Culture, Family Support, Socioeconomic Status, Black Media ...


A Study Of Support For Genetic Research Genetic Services And Education In Genetics Among African American Social Workers In Metropolitan Atlanta, Cynthia W. Ratchford May 2001

A Study Of Support For Genetic Research Genetic Services And Education In Genetics Among African American Social Workers In Metropolitan Atlanta, Cynthia W. Ratchford

ETD Collection for AUC Robert W. Woodruff Library

This study examined African American social workers' opinions about genetic research, genetic services, and education in genetics and selected factors associated with their opinions. Those factors were professional/work experience with clients with genetic issues; mass media exposure to genetic information: t.v., movies, newspapers, magazines; graduate social work course/unit in a course in genetics; personal/family experience with genetic issues; and gender.

There are no available studies on the readiness of African American social workers to practice in human genetic service delivery. This study was based on the premise that African American social workers' opinions about human genetics ...