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Aga Khan University

English Language and Literature

Institute for Educational Development, East Africa

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Multimodality And English Education In Ugandan Schools, Maureen Kendrick, Shelley Jones, Harriet Mutonyi, Bonny Norton Jan 2006

Multimodality And English Education In Ugandan Schools, Maureen Kendrick, Shelley Jones, Harriet Mutonyi, Bonny Norton

Institute for Educational Development, East Africa

In this article, we have made the case that multimodal pedagogies that include drawing, photography and drama have significant potential for enhancing teachers’ understanding of the way English is incorporated into students’ lives and how students can improve their understanding and use of the English language. In many ways, multimodal pedagogies represent a hybridization of indigenous and contemporary forms of communication. Drawings, as Vygotsky (1 12-1 13) notes, are children’s earliest representations of experience and stimulate their narrative impulse to create stories. By complementing such drawings with written narratives, teachers might encourage younger children to experiment not only with ...


Young Learners Of Modern Foreign Languages And Their Transition To The Secondary Phase: A Lost Opportunity?, Allison Bolster, Christine Balandier-Brown, Pauline Rea-Dickins Jan 2004

Young Learners Of Modern Foreign Languages And Their Transition To The Secondary Phase: A Lost Opportunity?, Allison Bolster, Christine Balandier-Brown, Pauline Rea-Dickins

Institute for Educational Development, East Africa

Following publication of the National Languages Strategy on 18 December 2002 the teaching of foreign languages (FL) in the primary school is again high on the agenda in England as in other parts of Europe. Research has shown in the past (Burstall et al., 1974) that an early start in FL does not necessarily result in any long-term advantage in terms of proficiency. However, the above study also draws other conclusions, less widely reported, which remain significant. These include insufficient liaison between primary and secondary schools, lack of continuity in foreign language learning across phases, inadequate training of teachers, and ...