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Full-Text Articles in Education

Student Response Systems In Higher Education: Moving Beyond Linear Teaching And Surface Learning, Harry L. Dangel, Charles Xiaoxue Wang Nov 2008

Student Response Systems In Higher Education: Moving Beyond Linear Teaching And Surface Learning, Harry L. Dangel, Charles Xiaoxue Wang

Educational Psychology and Special Education Faculty Publications

Over the past decade, instructors in colleges and universities increasingly have used Student Response Systems (SRSs)--typically in large classes to increase the level of student engagement and learning. Research shows that both students and instructors perceive SRSs to be beneficial, although evidence of improved learning has been less clear. Experts emphasize that instructors must consider how technology might enhance good pedagogy in order for increases in learning to occur. SRSs do increase student engagement and provide prompt feedback—two key practices that promote learning. However, professional groups propose goals for students in higher education that focus on deep learning ...


Digital Recordings And Assessment: An Alternative For Measuring Oral Proficiency, Peter B. Swanson, Patricia Early Jan 2008

Digital Recordings And Assessment: An Alternative For Measuring Oral Proficiency, Peter B. Swanson, Patricia Early

World Languages and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Technology For Oral Assessment, Patricia Early, Peter B. Swanson Jan 2008

Technology For Oral Assessment, Patricia Early, Peter B. Swanson

World Languages and Cultures Faculty Publications

With recent developments in multimedia recording, researchers have begun to investigate the use of technology in oral proficiency assessment. This article addresses the benefits and ease of using seven different multimedia tools to assess P-16 students’ oral language proficiency and compares traditional methods of in-class oral language assessment to out-of-class recordings. Additionally, the authors discuss the potential benefits of using technology to lower students’ affective filter, to provide teachers with a digital portfolio of student progress, and to increase instructional and preparation time.