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Strong Marriages In The African American Community: How Religion Contributes To A Healthier Marriage, Lucy K. Shirisia May 2014

Strong Marriages In The African American Community: How Religion Contributes To A Healthier Marriage, Lucy K. Shirisia

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This qualitative study investigated how religion contributes to or strengthens strong African American marriages. This study was conducted within the family strengths framework. In order to develop an in-depth understanding of how religion contributed to their marriages, five couples who talked extensively about religion in their marriage were selected out of the total sample of 39 couples and were presented as case studies. Six themes emerged across all five case studies: couples consistently practiced their religion, religion was the foundation of the marriage, religion strengthened personal growth, couples had exemplars for a strong marriage, couples turned to religion during difficult ...


Beyond Blue And White: University Of Kentucky Presidents And Desegregation, 1941-1987, Mark W. Russell Jan 2014

Beyond Blue And White: University Of Kentucky Presidents And Desegregation, 1941-1987, Mark W. Russell

Theses and Dissertations--Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation

This dissertation fills a gap in the historiography of southern higher education by focusing on five university presidents and their role in the desegregation of a non-elite flagship university in the Upper South. While historian Melissa Keane has studied the presidential role at elite private southern universities during the initial phase of the desegregation process, no study has yet examined desegregation from the president’s office at a southern land-grant university. Building upon historian Peter Wallenstein’s thesis that desegregation is not a single event in an institution’s history but rather an ongoing process, I argue that it was ...