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Full-Text Articles in Education

Sleep Health, Resources, Stress, And Academic Performance: Comparing Hospitality And Non-Hospitality Undergraduate Students, Yu-Chih Chiang Jan 2017

Sleep Health, Resources, Stress, And Academic Performance: Comparing Hospitality And Non-Hospitality Undergraduate Students, Yu-Chih Chiang

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In recent decades, there have been an increasing number of sleep studies in both science and social science. One explanation could be that sleep researchers’ focus has extended from sleep diseases to sleep health; this has expanded study populations beyond “unhealthy” patients to healthy people. In parallel, brain scientists have connected sleep with cognitive and emotional function, which intensified the discussion of sleep issues in daily life. Existing literature suggests a linkage between sleep and performance, but relative evidence is not solid. In particular, hospitality students’ sleep health should be studied given the potential impact of program requirements and industry ...


The Relationship Between Smartphone Use, Symptoms Of Depression, Symptoms Of Anxiety, And Academic Performance In College Students, Elizabeth Mae Longnecker Jan 2017

The Relationship Between Smartphone Use, Symptoms Of Depression, Symptoms Of Anxiety, And Academic Performance In College Students, Elizabeth Mae Longnecker

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The current study aims to research the relationship between smartphone use, symptoms of anxiety, symptoms of depression, and academic performance. Previous literature suggests that smartphone usage is related to mental health (Ha, Chin, Park, Ryu, and Yu, 2008; Rosen, Whaling, Rab, Carrier, and Cheever, 2013; Rosen, Whaling, Carrier, Cheever, & Rokkum, 2013; Van Ameringen, Mancini, & Farvolden, 2003). Studies have also linked mental health to academic performance in college students (Eisenberg, Golberstein, & Hunt, 2009; Hysenbegasi, Hass, & Rowland, 2005). Young adults ages 18-29 years old are most likely to own and use a smartphone compared to any other age group (Anderson, 2015; Smith, 2015); additionally, 75% of mental health disorders have their first onset before the age of 24. Therefore, the subject sample for this study focuses on college students. It is necessary to examine this relationship to understand possible predictors and provide recommendations on how academic institutions ...