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2015

Selected Works

Ian Newman

China

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Being Bullied And Psychosocial Adjustment Among Middle School Students In China, Yulan Cheng, Ian Newman, Ming Qu, Lazarous Mbulo, Yan Chai, Yan Chen, Duane F. Shell Apr 2015

Being Bullied And Psychosocial Adjustment Among Middle School Students In China, Yulan Cheng, Ian Newman, Ming Qu, Lazarous Mbulo, Yan Chai, Yan Chen, Duane F. Shell

Ian Newman

Background: Using the Chinese version of the Global School-based Health Survey (GSHS), this article describes the prevalence of being bullied among a nationally representative sample of Chinese students in grades 6-10 and explores the relationships between being bullied and selected indicators of psychosocial adjustment. Methods: A total of 9015 students in middle schools in Beijing, Hangzhou, Wuhan, and Urumqi completed the Chinese version of the GSHS. Researchers analyzed the results from 2 questions about the frequency and form of being bullied and 11 questions about psychosocial adjustment. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used in the analysis. Results: About 25 ...


Alcohol Expectancies Among High School Students In Inner Mongolia, China, Duane F. Shell, Ian Newman, Ming Qu Apr 2015

Alcohol Expectancies Among High School Students In Inner Mongolia, China, Duane F. Shell, Ian Newman, Ming Qu

Ian Newman

Objective — This study examines differences in Chinese high school students’ alcohol expectancies by drinking status (nondrinker, occasional drinker, regular drinker) and gender (male, female). Method — The authors administered the Chinese Adolescent Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire (CAEQ) to a convenience sample of 1244 high school students (M = 627; F = 617) from schools in Hohhot City and Tongliao City in Inner Mongolia, China. Results — Differences were found in the 8 CAEQ factors (3 negative and 5 positive factors). Regular drinkers had lower negative consequences and higher positive perception expectancies than nondrinkers or occasional drinkers. Nondrinkers had higher harm to person/reputation expectancies than ...