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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

“There’S Still That Window That’S Open”: The Problem With “Grit”, Noah Asher Golden Nov 2015

“There’S Still That Window That’S Open”: The Problem With “Grit”, Noah Asher Golden

Education Faculty Articles and Research

This narrative analysis case study challenges the education reform movement’s fascination with “grit,” the notion that a non-cognitive trait like persistence is at the core of disparate educational outcomes and the answer to our inequitable education system. Through analysis of the narratives and meaning-making processes of Elijah, a 20-year-old African American seeking his High School Equivalency diploma, this case study explores linkages among dominant discourses on meritocracy, opportunity, personal responsibility, and group blame. Specifically, exposition of the figured worlds present in Elijah’s narratives points to the attempted obfuscation of social inequities present in the current educational reform movement ...


The Role Of Perception, Interpretation, And Decision Making In The Development Of Beginning Teachers’ Competence, Rossella Santagata, Cathery Yeh Oct 2015

The Role Of Perception, Interpretation, And Decision Making In The Development Of Beginning Teachers’ Competence, Rossella Santagata, Cathery Yeh

Education Faculty Articles and Research

This study investigates beginning US elementary teachers’ competence for teaching mathematics and its development during teacher preparation and into the first 2 years of full-time teaching. Data are drawn from three longitudinal case studies and include the classroom video analysis survey, classroom observations and interviews about teachers’ instructional decisions, and whole-day shadowing. A multi-case study design was used to examine the processes of perception, interpretation, and decision making in participants’ comments on video clips of teaching episodes and in reflections about their own teaching. Findings support the central role of these processes in teacher competence and the generative power of ...


Social Justice And Technocracy: Tracing The Narratives Of Inclusive Education In The United States, Scot Danforth Aug 2015

Social Justice And Technocracy: Tracing The Narratives Of Inclusive Education In The United States, Scot Danforth

Education Faculty Articles and Research

Over the past two decades, the percentage of American students with disabilities educated in general classrooms with their nondisabled peers has risen by approximately fifty percent. This gradual but steady policy shift has been driven by two distinct narratives of organisational change. The social justice narrative espouses principles of equality and caring across human differences. The narrative of technocracy creates top-down, administrative pressure through hierarchical systems based on quantitative performance data. This article examines these two primary policy narratives of inclusive education in the United States, exploring the conceptual features of each and initiating an analysis of their application in ...


Beyond The Basics: Providing Continuing Education Workshops For Preceptors; A Commentary, Sara Nottingham, Michelle A. Cleary, Jason Bennett Jul 2015

Beyond The Basics: Providing Continuing Education Workshops For Preceptors; A Commentary, Sara Nottingham, Michelle A. Cleary, Jason Bennett

Education Faculty Articles and Research

Current Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) standards allow education programs to determine the most appropriate format and content of preceptor workshops. Clinicians, including preceptors, have noted challenges trying to keep their knowledge updated with current standards of care and educational competencies. Clinicians and preceptors in our program and the literature have described challenges trying to keep knowledge current with changing standards of care, research evidence, and athletic training educational competencies. Preceptors also value applicable and easily accessible continuing education opportunities. In order to address these challenges and provide accessible continuing education opportunities for preceptors, the faculty in ...


Constructing And Resisting Disability In Mathematics Classrooms: A Case Study Exploring The Impact Of Different Pedagogies, Rachel Lambert Jan 2015

Constructing And Resisting Disability In Mathematics Classrooms: A Case Study Exploring The Impact Of Different Pedagogies, Rachel Lambert

Education Faculty Articles and Research

This study demonstrates the importance of a critical lens on disability in mathematics educational research. This ethnographic and interview study investigated how ability and disability were constructed over 1 year in a middle school mathematics classroom. Children participated in two kinds of mathematical pedagogy that positioned children differently: procedural and discussion-based. These practices shifted over time, as the teacher increasingly focused on memorization of procedures to prepare for state testing. Two Latino/a children with learning disabilities, Ana and Luis, used multiple cultural practices as resources, mixing and remixing their engagement in and identifications with mathematics. Ana, though mastering the ...


Success After Failure: Academic Effects And Psychological Implications Of Early Universal Algebra Policies, Keith Howard, Martin Romero, Allison Scott, Derrick Saddler Jan 2015

Success After Failure: Academic Effects And Psychological Implications Of Early Universal Algebra Policies, Keith Howard, Martin Romero, Allison Scott, Derrick Saddler

Education Faculty Articles and Research

In this article, the authors use the High School Longitudinal Study 2009 (HSLS:09) national database to analyze the relationships between algebra failure, subsequent performance, motivation, and college readiness. Students who failed eighth-grade Algebra I did not differ significantly in mathematics proficiency from those who passed lower-level courses, but initially demonstrated significantly lower mathematics interest, mathematics utility, and mathematics identity. Both groups were less likely than the general population to meet college requirements in the eleventh grade, although students who passed a lower-level mathematics course fared better than those who failed Algebra I. Implications for policies addressing mathematics course enrollments ...