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2015

Curriculum and Social Inquiry

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Education

Winging It: Why Offering Honors Wings Works At Oral Roberts University, Ashley Sweeney, Hannah Covington, John Korstad Jan 2015

Winging It: Why Offering Honors Wings Works At Oral Roberts University, Ashley Sweeney, Hannah Covington, John Korstad

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Perhaps the first feature visitors notice about the campus of Oral Roberts University (ORU) is the drama and bravado of its futuristic architecture. With symbolic, gold-plated buildings and a Prayer Tower positioned at the campus’ center, ORU’s structural design certainly stands as a testament to the Jetsons-esque flavor of its 1960s and 1970s origin. ORU is a private Christian university located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. For many parents, one of the main draws of the school remains its strict policy against co-ed housing. Unlike some of its peer institutions, ORU only offers unisex dorms, which are divided into floors or ...


Lessons Learned From Nevada’S Honors Residential Scholars Community, Tamara Valentine Jan 2015

Lessons Learned From Nevada’S Honors Residential Scholars Community, Tamara Valentine

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

For the past 30 years, intentionally structured living-learning communities (LLCs) have sprung up across residential college campuses in the United States. Recent research has suggested that LLC participation facilitates faculty and peer interaction (Blimling, 1993; Schoem, 2004), influences student learning and the development of critical-thinking skills (Terenzini, Springer, Pascarella, & Nora, 1995; Whitt, Edison, Pascarella, Nora, & Terenzini, 1999), improves retention (Campbell & Fuqua, 2008; Daffron & Holland, 2009), reflects a commitment to civic engagement, and promotes smooth academic and social transitions to college life (Inkelas, Daver, Vogt, & Leonard, 2007; Stassen 2003). In fall 2005, in response to growing university enrollment and expressed student interest, Residential Life at the University of Nevada, Reno, expanded its campus housing options to include a living-learning program. To capitalize on the strong partnership with Residential Life, the honors program offered ...


The Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community At The University Of Massachusetts Amherst, Melissa Woglom, Meredith Lind Jan 2015

The Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community At The University Of Massachusetts Amherst, Melissa Woglom, Meredith Lind

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

This article provides a project overview of the newly constructed Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community, an historical context for the honors college at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a description of the facility design, information on the collaborative planning process, and a brief discussion of initial impacts on the operations and services of the honors college.


About The Authors Jan 2015

About The Authors

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

No abstract provided.


Housing Honors, Linda Frost, Lisa W. Kay, Rachael Poe Jan 2015

Housing Honors, Linda Frost, Lisa W. Kay, Rachael Poe

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Introduction: What We Talk About When We Talk About Housing Honors. . . ix Linda Frost

Part I: Housing Honors Today

CHAPTER 1: Where Honors Lives: Results from a Survey of the Structures and Spaces of U.S. Honors Programs and Colleges . . . 3 Linda Frost and Lisa W. Kay

Part II: Profiles of Spaces and Places in Honors

CHAPTER 2: The Commonwealth Honors College Residential Community at the University of Massachusetts Amherst . . . 47 Melissa Woglom and Meredith Lind

CHAPTER 3: Do Your Homework First, and Then Go Play! . . . 57 Larry Andrews

CHAPTER 4: The Genesis of Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona ...


Do Your Homework First, And Then Go Play!, Larry Andrews Jan 2015

Do Your Homework First, And Then Go Play!, Larry Andrews

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

In the fall of 2006, after five years of planning, the Kent State University Honors College inaugurated in the heart of the campus a new honors center: two residence halls framing an office, library, and classroom space came to life. The new center overlooked the Commons, an open green space home to student games and student protests. The hill above the Commons was the site of the National Guard shootings of May 4, 1970, and the relationship of this tragedy to honors at KSU became an important part of the thinking about this new location.

The Kent State University Honors ...


Honors Housing: Castle Or Prison?, Richard Badenhausen Jan 2015

Honors Housing: Castle Or Prison?, Richard Badenhausen

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

In its “Basic Characteristics” of fully developed honors programs and colleges—lists that have become increasingly prescriptive over the years—the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) identifies “best practices that are common to successful” honors programs and colleges (2014a). One of those practices includes the establishing of separate honors residential opportunities for students, despite the fact that such dedicated space is a bad idea in many instances. In light of the old saying that “one man’s castle is another man’s prison,” I will lay out some of the reasons why honors housing is not a good in itself ...


Pick Your Battles: It Is Possible To Have Belonging Without A Space To Belong To, Mariah Birgen Jan 2015

Pick Your Battles: It Is Possible To Have Belonging Without A Space To Belong To, Mariah Birgen

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

When Wartburg College began its new honors program 10 years ago, its architects thought they had done everything right. They sent a team to the National Collegiate Honors Council National Conference. They studied the “Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program” (National Collegiate Honors Council, 2014). They even decided to start small. Unfortunately, even meticulous preparation cannot overcome all difficulties. One of the characteristics, however, is to have a location to house the honors program. Wartburg’s 10-year saga of honors locations and lessons learned about honors space has produced this wisdom: honors directors and supporters should never give ...


One Size Does Not Fit All: When Honors Housing May Not Work, Laura Feitzinger Brown Jan 2015

One Size Does Not Fit All: When Honors Housing May Not Work, Laura Feitzinger Brown

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The gracious donor, the dean, and the other honors program director and I walk down the corridor of an old campus building needing repair but possessing a great deal of charm. While a science classroom building is being renovated, this hall houses temporary offices for displaced faculty. We look at the high ceilings in a room now used as a faculty break room and admire the way the morning sunlight plays on the walls. This room would make an amazing honors student lounge. Renovating the entire building would create a terrific honors dorm that could attract talented prospective students and ...


We The Students: Surveying Spaces And Envisioning The Future, Tatiana Cody, Rachael Poe Jan 2015

We The Students: Surveying Spaces And Envisioning The Future, Tatiana Cody, Rachael Poe

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

To apprehend the panoply of spaces that house honors on a national scale requires input from administrators and faculty. Nevertheless, one of the most important and often overlooked perspectives is that of honors students themselves. Admittedly, students are transient. After four or five years, most complete their undergraduate degrees, leaving their campuses, clubs, and honors programs behind after graduation. Despite their relatively brief time on campus, however, no one has more firsthand experience concerning housing honors students than honors students themselves, and some current honors students will certainly become honors administrators and faculty in the future. In the fall of ...


It Came With Everything: A Baby Grand Piano, Hardwood Floors, Regular Flooding, 200 Honors Students, And A Live-In Scholar, Gloria Cox Jan 2015

It Came With Everything: A Baby Grand Piano, Hardwood Floors, Regular Flooding, 200 Honors Students, And A Live-In Scholar, Gloria Cox

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

When the University of North Texas (UNT) opened its new Honors Hall on a hot Sunday in late August 2007, it was a residence hall in which everyone took considerable pride. Students loved the many amenities that the building featured, and they took pride in being able to call Honors Hall home. From the perspective of the honors college, the most significant feature was an apartment in which a scholar would live—a scholar who would be involved in the life of the hall and would, therefore, be engaged with the students who lived there. At that time, no other ...


Where Honors Lives: Results From A Survey Of The Structures And Spaces Of U.S. Honors Programs And Colleges, Linda Frost, Lisa W. Kay Jan 2015

Where Honors Lives: Results From A Survey Of The Structures And Spaces Of U.S. Honors Programs And Colleges, Linda Frost, Lisa W. Kay

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The ninth item on the National Collegiate Honors Council’s (2014b) list of “Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program” reads:

The program is located in suitable, preferably prominent, quarters on campus that provide both access for the students and a focal point for honors activity. Those accommodations include space for honors administrative, faculty, and support staff functions as appropriate. They may include space for an honors lounge, library, reading rooms, and computer facilities. If the honors program has a significant residential component, the honors housing and residential life functions are designed to meet the academic and social needs ...


Images For Part Ii: Profiles Of Spaces And Places In Honors Jan 2015

Images For Part Ii: Profiles Of Spaces And Places In Honors

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

No abstract provided.


What We Talk About When We Talk About Housing Honors, Linda Frost Jan 2015

What We Talk About When We Talk About Housing Honors, Linda Frost

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

When I went to college in the early 1980s at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, I entered as a freshman in the honors program. I have very specific memories of those first classes I took as an honors student—a section of honors sociology in which I wrote a case study of my German immigrant grandfather; an honors seminar in 1930s avant garde theatre in which the students wrote and performed plays based on the dreams they recorded nightly in their dream journals; an honors marine biology lab that ended at the professor’s house with a dinner where ...


Living In Hogwarts: The Experience Of A Dean Of Honors And His Wife While Living In An Honors Residence Hall, Keith Garbutt, Christine Garbutt Jan 2015

Living In Hogwarts: The Experience Of A Dean Of Honors And His Wife While Living In An Honors Residence Hall, Keith Garbutt, Christine Garbutt

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

On Friday, May 17, 2013, we watched the class of 2013 Honors Scholars at West Virginia University (WVU) enter the Honors Convocation to the sound of Non Nobis Domine. While certainly not our first Honors Scholars graduation since Keith had been running honors at WVU, it was nonetheless special. This cohort of graduates was the first freshman class to live in the specially built residence hall that houses the honors college administrative offices, each new freshman class of the honors college, and an apartment for faculty living in-residence.


The Genesis Of Barrett, The Honors College At Arizona State University, Mark Jacobs Jan 2015

The Genesis Of Barrett, The Honors College At Arizona State University, Mark Jacobs

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The honors college at Arizona State University (ASU) had its roots in the distributed honors programs in departments and schools that began in 1958 as ASU became a university by a statewide popular vote. It started as an honors college when it was created in 1988 by order of the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR), the only honors college in the state established in this way. The founding dean of what was at first called the ASU University Honors College was Ted Humphrey, who had earlier directed the university honors program. Professor Humphrey had very specific ideas about what the ...


The Colliding Cultures Of Honors And Housing, Melissa L. Johnson, Elizabeth Mcneil, Cory Lee, Kathy Keeter Jan 2015

The Colliding Cultures Of Honors And Housing, Melissa L. Johnson, Elizabeth Mcneil, Cory Lee, Kathy Keeter

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The University of Florida’s honors residential college was completed in 2002. It remains the newest and most expensive residence hall on campus to this day, housing more than 600 honors students, a faculty-in-residence, a classroom, and a multiroom study lounge. On paper, the residential college is a beautiful partnership between Florida’s University Honors Program and the Department of Housing and Residential Education. In practice, however, two distinct cultures have emerged between the two offices.


Living To Learn, Learning For Life: Housing Honors Classrooms And Offices In An Honors Residence Hall, Karen Lyons Jan 2015

Living To Learn, Learning For Life: Housing Honors Classrooms And Offices In An Honors Residence Hall, Karen Lyons

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

I left the interview with high-hopes: being Assistant Director of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Honors Program sounded like an excellent fit for me. A full-time job, a real income, and no longer having to depend on year-to-year contracts as an adjunct were appealing. The opportunity to teach tied into my strengths, and since I had taught UNL honors classes previously, I knew the high quality of the students. I also knew the director and was excited about the prospect of working with him. As I wended my way, in heels and suit, through the extensive construction going on in the ...


Building Community In Árbol De La Vida, Patricia Maccorquodale Jan 2015

Building Community In Árbol De La Vida, Patricia Maccorquodale

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Building community has been part of the mission of the University of Arizona Honors College since its founding in 1962. In 2011, a new honors residence hall opened that epitomizes its community of scholars. This essay explores how an honors hall— through its design and programming—can build community, emphasize sustainability, facilitate learning, and encourage an outward focus. This housing experience reinforces the values and goals of honors education and contributes to a personalized, close-knit community in the context of a large, public university.


Honors Students’ Perceptions Of The Value And Importance Of Honors Housing, Angela D. Mead, Samantha Rieger, Leslie Sargent Jones Jan 2015

Honors Students’ Perceptions Of The Value And Importance Of Honors Housing, Angela D. Mead, Samantha Rieger, Leslie Sargent Jones

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

In 2011, we participated in a panel presentation, entitled “Where Honors Lives,” about the new honors college complex then under construction at Appalachian State University (ASU). This complex was to consist of two new buildings: a ten-story residence hall for the honors college students and a three-story building with honors offices and classrooms on the top two floors. Unfortunately, between initial planning in the mid-2000s and building five years later, University Housing changed its mind and decided freshmen would not be allowed to live there because suite-style housing was deemed inappropriate for that population. Current honors students could live there ...


Building Honors Community Through Honors Housing, Barry Falk Jan 2015

Building Honors Community Through Honors Housing, Barry Falk

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

A strong sense of honors community is a fundamentally important characteristic of a vibrant honors program or college. In fact, I am fond of saying that “community, community, community” are the three most important characteristics of a strong honors program. The idea of community does not appear, however, in the National Collegiate Honors Council’s “Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors College” or the “Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program.” Perhaps that absence is because this characteristic, regardless of how it is expressed, would be difficult to verify.


Honors Space: What To Do When There Isn’T Any, Joy Ochs Jan 2015

Honors Space: What To Do When There Isn’T Any, Joy Ochs

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

I direct a small honors program from my faculty office in the English Department at Mount Mercy University, which is an institution that is outgrowing its tiny campus. It is an exciting time, with new graduate programs and athletic facilities being added. But there is not enough space. At the end of May 2013, a memo from Academic Affairs made this request: “please contact your students to pack up any personal items they have left in the Honors Lounge, as we need to repurpose that room over the summer.” I have received a memo like this about every year or ...


Life Of The Mind/Life Of The House: “This Place Matters”, Vicki Ohl Jan 2015

Life Of The Mind/Life Of The House: “This Place Matters”, Vicki Ohl

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

“This Place Matters,” the slogan of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, proclaims the importance of a physical property to the understanding of history, traditions, and values (“This place matters,” 2013). “This Place” may be a single room, a building, a neighborhood, or an entire city. The National Collegiate Honors Council has long recognized the power of place by dedicating an extended session at its annual meetings to the exploration of the host city, its popular City as Text™ explorations. Although a community is ultimately defined by its people, the location and architecture contribute to a setting and a history ...


It’S All In The Family: The (Honors) Ties That Bind Us, Jamaica Afiya Pouncy Jan 2015

It’S All In The Family: The (Honors) Ties That Bind Us, Jamaica Afiya Pouncy

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

For many years, the Texas A&M Honors Program functioned in an extremely fluid manner. Students were deemed “honors eligible” according to their grade point average; if that average dropped below the set requirement, they became “honors ineligible.” If the GPA rose, they were eligible again. Under this policy, students continuously floated in and out of the honors community. The recent shift to an application-based process has created an official cohort of honors students as well as the challenge of building a community in a program that has had little sense of continuity.


Living-Learning Communities: As Natural As Cats And Dogs Living Together, John R. Purdie Ii Jan 2015

Living-Learning Communities: As Natural As Cats And Dogs Living Together, John R. Purdie Ii

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Fully achieving all the potential benefits of a living-learning community requires effective collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs. Unfortunately, because of differences in organizational structures, priorities, cultural norms, and even the types of people drawn to work in academic affairs and student affairs, collaboration between faculty and staff is as unnatural as cats and dogs living together. Understanding these differences and recognizing the two subcultures that operate within most college housing departments can mitigate the challenges that honors faculty and staff can face when collaborating with staff in housing.


The Place To Be: Designing A City-Connected Honors Residence In Rotterdam, Remko Remijnse Jan 2015

The Place To Be: Designing A City-Connected Honors Residence In Rotterdam, Remko Remijnse

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

Traditionally, university students in the Netherlands, even honors students, find accommodations on their own; they will rent a room in a house and live together with other students who have independently rented a room in that same building. The typical Dutch student residence is an old, centrally located house that will accommodate five to eight students. While these students would be complete strangers when they begin their time living together, they quickly become a cohesive community, deciding for themselves how their life in the space will be organized by setting up cooking schedules and other agreed-upon formats for using the ...


Where Honors Lives: Old Central At Oklahoma State University, Robert Spurrier, Jessica Roark Jan 2015

Where Honors Lives: Old Central At Oklahoma State University, Robert Spurrier, Jessica Roark

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The story of where honors lives at Oklahoma State University is one of a series of twists and turns over the years and in many ways actually reenacts the proverbial rags to riches story.

Until 1988, honors space at Oklahoma State University (OSU) was limited to the office of the faculty member who had the title of Honors Director in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) and received 0.25 FTE reassigned time for his honors duties. When one of the co-authors of this chapter was asked to become A&S Honors Director in 1988, he already had ...


“In An Old Nave’S Grime”: The Spencer Honors House, Rusty Rushton Jan 2015

“In An Old Nave’S Grime”: The Spencer Honors House, Rusty Rushton

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The University Honors Program (UHP) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), its 200 or so students, and its four full-time staff members (Director, Associate Director, Program Coordinator, and Program Manager), all have the good fortune to call home a beautiful old church on the south side of UAB and Birmingham. The Spencer Honors House is where the UHP holds its classes and conducts its business and where the program’s students convene for the myriad reasons honors students convene: committee meetings, late-night study sessions, general recreation especially of the pool and ping pong sort, hanging out, or spending ...


Anomalies And Ambiguities Of A Faculty-In-Residence, Paul Strom Jan 2015

Anomalies And Ambiguities Of A Faculty-In-Residence, Paul Strom

Chapters from NCHC Monographs Series

The idea of housing faculty with college students on a campus can certainly be traced back centuries to the college structures within universities such as the University of Paris, Oxford University, and Cambridge University. To be a faculty-in-residence at a modern university requires a conscious decision to live in an ambiguous and sometimes anomalous space that connects housing operations and academics. I occupy such a space, along with my wife and dog, a Golden Retriever, at the University of Colorado, Boulder.