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Full-Text Articles in Education

Breaking The Rules Of Discussion: Examples Of Rethinking The Student-Centered Classroom, Lamont Egle, Evelyn Navarre, Cheryl Nixon Jan 2011

Breaking The Rules Of Discussion: Examples Of Rethinking The Student-Centered Classroom, Lamont Egle, Evelyn Navarre, Cheryl Nixon

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This essay explores teaching techniques that seem to go against discussion-based pedagogy but ultimately achieve what we believe to be more productive forms of student discussion. Egle, Navarre, and Nixon describe how experimenting with new models of discussion has led them to define discussion as storytelling, as craft, and as idea-invention. Navarre explains how and why she uses storytelling to encourage multiple levels of engagement with texts, using interspersed narrative that aims to “people” the classroom with authors. Egle explains his commitment to discussion as a form of craft, examining how taking topics “off the table” and limiting the direction ...


“Islamicizing” A Euro/American Curriculum, Mary Ball Howkins Jan 2011

“Islamicizing” A Euro/American Curriculum, Mary Ball Howkins

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

A curriculum revision task that seems compelling in 2011, ten years after 9/11/2001, is “Islamicizing” my part in an art history and General Education liberal arts curriculum. Standard art history survey texts include historical sections on Islamic visual traditions but decline to integrate new information on the ways in which medieval Islamic scholars contributed to the foundation of the 15th and 16th century Renaissances in Europe, or the ways in which global trade and cultural contact influenced the appearance of visual art of that time and region, and in later centuries. Recent re-evaluators of Islamic cultural contributions make ...


Modernizing Classical Language Education: Communicative Language Teaching & Educational Technology Integration In Classical Greek, Apostolos Koutropoulos Jan 2011

Modernizing Classical Language Education: Communicative Language Teaching & Educational Technology Integration In Classical Greek, Apostolos Koutropoulos

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Classical language education has changed little over the past three decades despite advances in academic technology and advances in our understanding of both second language acquisition and human development. This paper proposes a modification to classical language teaching and the classical language curriculum based on findings of second language acquisition research, as well as factoring in observational data of students taking an introductory course in Ancient Greek.


Why Is It Important To Teach About Race, Caste And Gender?: An Anthropologist’S Viewpoint, Tara Devi S. Ashok Jan 2011

Why Is It Important To Teach About Race, Caste And Gender?: An Anthropologist’S Viewpoint, Tara Devi S. Ashok

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This paper deals with the question of why it is important to teach about race, caste, and gender, when so much has already been written. I have attempted here to emphasize more the biologically-based, underlying mechanisms with regard to ethnicity, caste and gender. They are not so clearly understood, though these are simply variations in nature, which produce diversity in morphology and health patterns, allowing the human genome to be analyzed at all these levels. Therefore, it helps in the understanding of the phylogeny, patterns of migration and disease associations, and gene-environmental interactions. On the one hand we humans have ...


Student Collaboration Online In A Critical Thinking Course, Bob Schoenberg Jan 2011

Student Collaboration Online In A Critical Thinking Course, Bob Schoenberg

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This article identifies several benefits of student online collaboration and describes a number of collaborative tools that can be used without charge. The author also shares with readers several different strategies for promoting collaboration, including some of his personal tips and suggestions, based on his experience of teaching an online course on Critical Thinking at UMass Boston. The author argues that online education offers many opportunities for students to learn a variety of subjects, think critically and work collaboratively. However, for online faculty to be effective in their teaching they need training and experience.


Addressing Plagiarism In A Digital Age, Eleanor Kutz, Wayne Rhodes, Stephen Sutherland, Vivian Zamel Jan 2011

Addressing Plagiarism In A Digital Age, Eleanor Kutz, Wayne Rhodes, Stephen Sutherland, Vivian Zamel

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Four faculty members from UMass Boston's English Department explore possible ways of addressing the issue of plagiarism with their students as easy access to materials on the Internet is making it easier then ever to draw on others’ words, with or without appropriate documentation. Approaching faculty concerns from four complementary perspectives, the authors make the case for 1) recasting our understanding of plagiarism in terms of influence, borrowing, and remixing of the sort that is central to musical and artistic creation, 2) examining how students might develop greater awareness of the ways in which they are working with sources ...


“Two Markets, Two Universities”: An Experimental, Cross-Cultural, And Cross-Institutional Course Using Online Educational Technologies, Edward J. Romar, Annamaria Sas, Irene Yukhananov, Alan Girelli, Teddy Hristov Jan 2011

“Two Markets, Two Universities”: An Experimental, Cross-Cultural, And Cross-Institutional Course Using Online Educational Technologies, Edward J. Romar, Annamaria Sas, Irene Yukhananov, Alan Girelli, Teddy Hristov

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This paper discusses the development and implementation of a technology-based, cross-cultural and cross-institutional undergraduate marketing course titled “Two Markets, Two Universities,” offered by the University of Massachusetts Boston and the University of Pannonia in Veszprem, Hungary. It outlines the course strategy, structure and results as well as the challenges in offering a cross-cultural and cross-institutional course to undergraduates.