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Full-Text Articles in Education

Early Childhood Bilingualism Leads To Advances In Executive Attention: Dissociating Culture And Language, Sujin Yang, Hwajin Yang, Barbara Lust Jul 2011

Early Childhood Bilingualism Leads To Advances In Executive Attention: Dissociating Culture And Language, Sujin Yang, Hwajin Yang, Barbara Lust

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

This study investigated whether early especially efficient utilization of executive functioning in young bilinguals would transcend potential cultural benefits. To dissociate potential cultural effects from bilingualism, four-year-old U.S. Korean-English bilingual children were compared to three monolingual groups – English and Korean monolinguals in the U.S.A. and another Korean monolingual group, in Korea. Overall, bilinguals were most accurate and fastest among all groups. The bilingual advantage was stronger than that of culture in the speed of attention processing, inverse processing efficiency independent of possible speed-accuracy trade-offs, and the network of executive control for conflict resolution. A culture advantage favoring ...


Outcomes Assessment Of Role-Play Scenarios For Teaching Responsible Conduct Of Research, Stephanie N. Seiler, Bradley J. Brummel, Kerri L. Anderson, Kyoung Jin Kim, Serena G. Wee, C. K. Gunsalus, Michael C. Loui Jul 2011

Outcomes Assessment Of Role-Play Scenarios For Teaching Responsible Conduct Of Research, Stephanie N. Seiler, Bradley J. Brummel, Kerri L. Anderson, Kyoung Jin Kim, Serena G. Wee, C. K. Gunsalus, Michael C. Loui

Research Collection School of Social Sciences

We describe the summative assessment of role-play scenarios that we previously developed to teach central topics in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) to graduate students in science and engineering. Interviews with role-play participants, with participants in a case discussion training session, and with untrained students suggested that role-playing might promote a deeper appreciation of RCR by shifting the focus away from wanting to simply “know the rules.“ We also present the results of a think-aloud case analysis study and describe the development of a behaviorally-anchored rating scale (BARS) to assess participants' case analysis performance.