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Utah State University

Cattle

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Protocol For Trichomonas Diagnosis In Cattle For Utah, Bruce King, Kerry Rood Jun 2012

Protocol For Trichomonas Diagnosis In Cattle For Utah, Bruce King, Kerry Rood

All Current Publications

Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus, is a serious reproductive (venereal) disease found in some Utah cattle herds. Diagnosis of trichomoniasis is made when trichomonad organisms are detected in the smegma or preputial flush samples of bulls, or the uterine/vaginal fluids of cows


A Model For Data Collection And Reporting For Cow/Calf And Feedlot Operations, Dale Zobell, Michael Coe, Brett Bowman Jan 2005

A Model For Data Collection And Reporting For Cow/Calf And Feedlot Operations, Dale Zobell, Michael Coe, Brett Bowman

All Current Publications

This fact sheet evaluates identification tags used at the Utah State cow/calf ranch operation, includng the identification devices, the hardware used to record individual data, and the data collection software.


Applying Principles Of Crossbreeding, Dale Zobell, C. Kim Chapman May 2004

Applying Principles Of Crossbreeding, Dale Zobell, C. Kim Chapman

All Current Publications

Crossbreeding can be a powerful tool to improve the productivity and profitability of a beef cattle operation when it is used correctly. This fact sheet explains considerations that need to be made for successful production and profitability.


Processed Corn Silage Effects On Digestibility And Production Of Growing Beef Replacement Heifers, Dale Zobell, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier Feb 2004

Processed Corn Silage Effects On Digestibility And Production Of Growing Beef Replacement Heifers, Dale Zobell, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier

All Current Publications

Forage is generally the principle feedstuff in feedlot diets for growing cattle and, as such, its nutritive value will determine weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency. In feedlot diets for growing cattle, corn silage can constitute up to 60% of the diet (DMB).


Comparative Productivity Of Five Cool-Season Pasture Grasses Under Intermittent Flood Irrigation Grazed By Beef Cow-Calf Pairs Using Management Intensive Grazing Practices, Dale Zobell, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier Jan 2004

Comparative Productivity Of Five Cool-Season Pasture Grasses Under Intermittent Flood Irrigation Grazed By Beef Cow-Calf Pairs Using Management Intensive Grazing Practices, Dale Zobell, Ken Olson, Randall Wiedmeier

All Current Publications

Utah State University is engaged in studies to determine management practices that can be employed under intensive irrigated pasture to increase productivity and viability of beef and dairy producers in Utah. One of these initiatives was a study comparing five cool-season grasses grazed by beef cow-calf pairs over a 4-year period.


Studies On Feeding Wheat Middlings To Beef Heifers And Growing And Finishing Beef Steers, Dale Zobell, K. C. Olson, C. A. Stonecipher, R. D. Wiedmeier, J. S. Murdock, D. A. Chandler May 2003

Studies On Feeding Wheat Middlings To Beef Heifers And Growing And Finishing Beef Steers, Dale Zobell, K. C. Olson, C. A. Stonecipher, R. D. Wiedmeier, J. S. Murdock, D. A. Chandler

All Current Publications

The type and amount of concentrate included in beef cattle diets can greatly influence production and profitability. Small grains are typically fed in these rations, but the inclusion of by-product feeds, such as wheat middlings (WM), in growing and finishing diets have recently been studied (Dalke et al., 1997; Blasi et al., 1998).


Vaccination Program For Beef Calves (2001 - Clell Bagley), Clell Bagley Oct 2001

Vaccination Program For Beef Calves (2001 - Clell Bagley), Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Vaccines are an important tool to use in herd health programs for the protection of animal health. However, vaccines do not prevent all disease by themselves, and should be used in conjunction with good management practices. The timing of vaccination and selection of product are important considerations.


Video Ordering Information For Realizing The Impact Of Injection Site Lesions, Clell Bagley Jun 2001

Video Ordering Information For Realizing The Impact Of Injection Site Lesions, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Injection of almost any drug or solution into the muscles of a food animal will result in scar tissue formation and some residual lesion in those muscle tissues. These lesions are very displeasing to consumers if found in meat products. Their presence also contributes to loss of tenderness for much of the remainder of the cut of meat. If found during processing, the lesions can be trimmed out but this still results in trim loss and increased labor costs for the processor.


Realizing The Impact Of Injection Site Lesions, Clell Bagley Mar 2001

Realizing The Impact Of Injection Site Lesions, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

A major effort has been made by the beef industry in recent years to reduce the economic loss from injection site lesions. Injections of almost any vaccine or medication causes some lesion. The extent, severity and economic loss of the resulting lesion can be greatly reduced with cleanliness and by use of careful techniques for the placement of product into specific, designated sites.


Factors Influencing Grazing Tolerance, Behave Jan 2000

Factors Influencing Grazing Tolerance, Behave

All Current Publications

This publication discusses the different factors that influence grazing intolerance.


Helping Dairy Producers Reduce The Scc, Clell Bagley Jan 2000

Helping Dairy Producers Reduce The Scc, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Practicing veterinarians are in an excellent position to help dairy producers recognize and deal with the problem of elevated somatic cell counts (SCC). Yet they are seldom asked to assist. A high SCC is an indication of chronic, subclinical mastitis in the herd and is also an indication of significant economic losses.


Abortion In Cattle, Clell Bagley Oct 1999

Abortion In Cattle, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Abortion is the premature expulsion of the fetus from the dam and usually occurs because the fetus has died in-utero. If death occurs at 1-2 months of gestation, it is usually termed “early embryonic death.”


Colloidal Silver Not Approved For Treating Animals, Clell Bagley Aug 1997

Colloidal Silver Not Approved For Treating Animals, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

FDA has received reports that products containing colloidal silver are being promoted for use in the treatment of mastitis and other serious disease conditions of dairy cattle, as well as for various conditions of companion animals. For example, FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine has received reports from the Agency's regional milk specialists and State inspectors that colloidal silver products have been found on some dairy farms.


Vaccinating To Prevent Pneumonia, Clell Bagley, Donald Snyder, Nyle Matthews Jul 1997

Vaccinating To Prevent Pneumonia, Clell Bagley, Donald Snyder, Nyle Matthews

All Current Publications

Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) is a major problem for cattle and it continues to cause serious economic losses. Pneumonia is its most serious form. BRD causes increased death losses, higher medication and labor costs, and lost production. It occurs most commonly within a few weeks of weaning and is especially troublesome then. BRD is more serious in calves which are shipped long distances right after weaning and is often referred to as shipping fever.


Weak Calf Syndrome Or Bvd Fetal Infection, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Weak Calf Syndrome Or Bvd Fetal Infection, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

A serious health problem of newborn calves was recognized 20 years ago and termed “weak calf syndrome”(WCS). The Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD) virus was often isolated from affected calves and from these herds. In recent years, veterinarians have again been looking at the effects of the BVD virus on the fetus.


Controlling Coliform Mastitis, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Controlling Coliform Mastitis, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Coliform mastitis is usually considered as an acute disease although some milder forms and even chronic cases do occur. It is caused by the bacterial organism Escherichia coli, hence the name, coliform. Other, related organisms, Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are also often called “coliforms.”


Disease Resistance In Cattle, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Disease Resistance In Cattle, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

The ability of cattle to resist the many disease processes to which they are exposed is truly amazing. And yet, when several adverse factors combine, this resistance can be overcome and result in a herd disaster which is just as amazing. This discussion will be broken down into four major areas. But it is the combined functioning of all four areas that actually provides disease resistance.


Bluetongue In Cattle, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Bluetongue In Cattle, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that is spread mainly by one specific type of gnat. Other gnats and blood sucking insects may occasionally transmit BT, but they are much less important in its transfer. Cattle are the main reservoir for overwintering of the virus in temperate climates.


Understanding Bull Breeding Soundness Exams, Clell Bagley, Craig Burrell Jul 1997

Understanding Bull Breeding Soundness Exams, Clell Bagley, Craig Burrell

All Current Publications

Controversy still exists about Breeding Soundness Examinations (BSE) and what they can and cannot do. At times they are not used because of a lack of understanding of their value while at other times they are used with unrealistic expectations. First, BSE is performed to identify bulls with reduced fertility not just to find those which are sterile. Very few bulls are sterile but a significant percent have reduced fertility.


Preventing Calf Losses, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Preventing Calf Losses, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Many beef producers and practicing veterinarians noted there were higher than normal calf death losses during the 1993 calving season. We were especially aware of the increased losses here in the western states, but there were also heavy losses in the midwest and east, so the problem was very widespread.


Clinical Trials With Copper Supplementation, Clell Bagley, Norris Stenquist, Dennis Worwood Jul 1997

Clinical Trials With Copper Supplementation, Clell Bagley, Norris Stenquist, Dennis Worwood

All Current Publications

Copper deficiency has been diagnosed in beef cattle herds in many areas of the intermountain west. Copper supplements are not widely used, even though several products are available. It is difficult to correct a deficiency because too much copper can result in copper toxicity or poisoning. Toxicity is less a hazard with cattle than with sheep, but it is still a problem to guard against. Periodic monitoring of the herd’s copper status is essential for proper supplementation.


Updating Your Herd Health Plan, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Updating Your Herd Health Plan, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Animal health is not sold in a bottle, syringe or sack. It comes as a result of proper management. The increased concentration and movement of cattle and demands for greater production necessitate an improved level of management to maintain cattle health.


Weaning Calves Successfully, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Weaning Calves Successfully, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

The production loss and death loss of calves at weaning is second only to the losses at calving. Weaning is a very stressful time and bovine respiratory disease (pneumonia, shipping fever, etc.) is a common problem. Coccidiosis and other digestive problems, such as acidosis, (grain overload) are also common.


Yew Had Better Watch Out!, Clell Bagley, Kip Panter Jul 1997

Yew Had Better Watch Out!, Clell Bagley, Kip Panter

All Current Publications

If you see clippings from ornamental, evergreen shrubs that someone has dumped where cattle, horses, sheep, etc., can eat them, you had better move the plants or the animals. If you don’t, expect some dead animals.


Staph Mastitis: Herd Control Program, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Staph Mastitis: Herd Control Program, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is a major problem for some dairy herds. It causes high Somatic Cell Counts (SCC), reduces milk quality, and may cause a loss of milk market. It limits milk production for the herd, reduces efficiency, and continues to spread to other cows.


Internal Parasites, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Internal Parasites, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Internal parasites and how they affect animals.


Ammonia Toxicity In A Herd Of Beef Cattle, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Ammonia Toxicity In A Herd Of Beef Cattle, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

A Utah producer lost 22 out of 50 head of cows in May, due to ammonia toxicity. He used a liquid fertilizer tank to haul water to the cattle. He had done this for two years previously, and with washing out thoroughly, there had been no problem. But this time some fertilizer was evidently left in, mixed with the water and resulted in the toxicosis.


Preparing Bulls For The Breeding Season, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Preparing Bulls For The Breeding Season, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

With proper care prior to and during the breeding season, cattlemen can increase the breeding capacity of bulls. Breeding soundness evaluations and trichomoniasis testing are tools which can aid a herd manager as he makes critical decisions for next year’s calf crop.


Copper Deficiency In Utah, Clell Bagley, Norris Stenquist, Dennis Worwood Jul 1997

Copper Deficiency In Utah, Clell Bagley, Norris Stenquist, Dennis Worwood

All Current Publications

Copper deficiency has been diagnosed in a number of Utah cattle herds, yet few producers use copper supplements. Cattle deficient in the element can suffer significant production losses. Producers need to balance both the effects and the costs of copper supplements. Too much copper can cause copper toxicity or poisoning. And adding copper may not be economical if animals are only marginally deficient. Further, the deficiency may occur only on specific feeds or pastures, correcting itself when cattle are moved.


Dealing With Drought And Short Feed Supplies For Beef Cattle, Clell Bagley Jul 1997

Dealing With Drought And Short Feed Supplies For Beef Cattle, Clell Bagley

All Current Publications

Weather patterns greatly impact feed supplies for almost all areas of Utah. Both grazing and harvested feed supplies are usually reduced with drought conditions. The hay QUALITY may actually be improved because of the excellent drying conditions for harvest. Taking good care of hay supplies to protect that quality may allow use of less feed in the winter to achieve acceptable results.