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Full-Text Articles in Education

Indigenous Women, Mother Tongues, And Nation Building In New England: A Tribal Policy Leadership Series, Amy Den Ouden, Chris Bobel Apr 2014

Indigenous Women, Mother Tongues, And Nation Building In New England: A Tribal Policy Leadership Series, Amy Den Ouden, Chris Bobel

Office of Community Partnerships Posters

In collaboration with the Wôpanâak Language Reclamation Project (WLRP), Indigenous women educators and leaders, the Dept. of Women’s and Gender Studies is redesigning WOST/WGS 270, Native American Women in North America, to incorporate a lecture series on nation building and a semester-long community engagement project fostering student leadership in a research and policy formation project focused on legislating and funding a Native American language education law in Massachusetts.


The Memory Keeper: Analyzing The Importance Of Collecting And Preserving Oral Histories In A Twenty-First Century University Archival Repository, Arabeth Balasko May 2013

The Memory Keeper: Analyzing The Importance Of Collecting And Preserving Oral Histories In A Twenty-First Century University Archival Repository, Arabeth Balasko

History/Archives Capstones Collection

Recognizing the importance of collecting and incorporating individuals’ memories into an institution’s archival repository is a fundamental task that archivists must professionally and ethically accept. Depending on the repository’s specific needs and mission goals the collection policies will differ; however, disregarding the personal stories of the working population of the university is a disservice to archival collecting. How can a user analyze the completed history of an academic institution without providing the documented input and sharing of personal experiences of faculty, staff, and students? How can a researcher evaluate theory and explore a multitude of viewpoints, if only ...


Higher Education In The 1960'S: The Origins Of The University Of Massachusetts Boston, Diane D'Arrigo Dec 2004

Higher Education In The 1960'S: The Origins Of The University Of Massachusetts Boston, Diane D'Arrigo

American Studies Graduate Final Projects

On June 18, 1964, Governor Endicott Peabody signed the bill to create the University of Massachusetts at Boston. Just fifteen months later, in the fall of 1965, the University of Massachusetts Boston opened its doors for its first class of students. Joining the more than 1200 students were 75 faculty and 10 staff people. They were pioneers in creating an institution which held enormous hope and promise of serving its urban community at a time of major change in higher education, specifically and in society, generally.

Today, the University of Massachusetts Boston is one of five campuses that make up ...


Teaching Economics In United States History: One Teacher Shares Some Lessons, Kathleen S. Bullock Aug 2002

Teaching Economics In United States History: One Teacher Shares Some Lessons, Kathleen S. Bullock

Critical and Creative Thinking Capstones Collection

This paper addresses the value and benefits of teaching economics in U.S. History at the high school level. Some of the challenges it presents such as curriculum style, teacher qualifications, assessment and accountability, pacing, and developing thinking skills for a theory-based course are discussed. I also offer activities with accompanying worksheets and graphic organizers that may assist teachers in meeting these challenges. The activities include tariffs, a run on the bank, monopolies, and recessions as an introduction to basic economic principles that are important in teaching U.S. History. A set of graphic organizers on The Civil War demonstrates ...


Black Women In Antebellum America: Active Agents In The Fight For Freedom, Sandra M. Grayson Jan 1996

Black Women In Antebellum America: Active Agents In The Fight For Freedom, Sandra M. Grayson

William Monroe Trotter Institute Publications

The most prominent images of Black women in antebellum America depicted in classes across the United States are of passive victims as opposed to active agents of change. The names and deeds of Black women like Frances E. W. Harper, Maria Stewart, Sarah Mapps Douglass, and Sarah Jane Giddings are not an integral part of American education. Further, most history books overlook Black women's roles in antebellum America — oversights which can be considered suppression through historical omission. In order to reflect a more accurate picture of American history, public and private school curriculums need to include texts by and ...