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Full-Text Articles in Education

Language, Identity, And Citizenship: Politics Of Education In Madawaska, 1842-1920, Elisa E A Sance Aug 2020

Language, Identity, And Citizenship: Politics Of Education In Madawaska, 1842-1920, Elisa E A Sance

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The establishment of the international border between Maine and New Brunswick in 1842 through the signature of the Webster-Ashburton treaty divided the Francophone population of the Madawaska region along the Saint John River. As a result, each half became administered by an Anglophone government. The linguistic and cultural differences between the Madawaska French and the Anglo-Saxon Protestant ruling majority in both the state and the province complicated the establishment of new public institutions. The language of both administrations as well as the language of public education was English; a language that very few people among the Madawaska French spoke or ...


College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences_Hty 398 Epidemics In American History Course, Michael Lang, Timothy M. Cole Jun 2020

College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences_Hty 398 Epidemics In American History Course, Michael Lang, Timothy M. Cole

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Email thread featuring messages from Michael Lang, Associate Professor of History, History Department, University of Maine to Timothy M. Cole, Associate Dean for Academics, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor Cole to Jonathon Jue-Wong, Administrative Coordinator, The Office of the Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs & Provost regarding Patrick Callaway, UM History PhD 2019, teaching a topics course (HTY 398) on "Epidemics in American History" in the 2020 Fall Semester at the Hutchinson Center.


College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences_Hty 462 American Revolution_Revised Syllabus, Liam Riordan Apr 2020

College Of Liberal Arts And Sciences_Hty 462 American Revolution_Revised Syllabus, Liam Riordan

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Revised syllabus for the History 462: The American Revolution course taught by Liam Riordan, Professor of History, History Department, University of Maine. The revision included a unit on smallpox during the American Revolution. Also, includes cover emails regarding the submission of course material to the Provost Office.


Entre Nosotros (University Of Maine) Records, 1939-1976, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine Jan 2018

Entre Nosotros (University Of Maine) Records, 1939-1976, Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University Of Maine

Finding Aids

Copies of Entre Nosotros, a publication of Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society (La Sociedad Nacional Honoraria Hispánica).


Orono: Growing As A University Town, 1965-2015, Evan D. Richert Aicp, Sophia L. Wilson Jun 2016

Orono: Growing As A University Town, 1965-2015, Evan D. Richert Aicp, Sophia L. Wilson

Maine History

By 1965, the Town of Orono’s long history as a lumber town had faded and it had grown into a small university town. Demographically and socially, Orono today demonstrates many of the markers of a university town—from its occupational profile and residency of university employees and students to its growing knowledge-based economy and its evolving downtown of “third places.” But there are differences, too, from a typical university town—for example, in the relative physical isolation of the University of Maine from the rest of the town, and in Orono’s small population compared with the university’s ...


The Sixties: Turmoil And Transformation In The Nation, In Higher Education, And At The University Of Maine, Peter Hoff Jun 2016

The Sixties: Turmoil And Transformation In The Nation, In Higher Education, And At The University Of Maine, Peter Hoff

Maine History

The University of Maine entered its second century of existence in February 1965, in the midst of a period known as “the sixties,” characterized by a cultural revolution, a robust civil rights movement, and a long war in Vietnam. These elements profoundly affected the nation, its people, and the University of Maine. So did the arrival of a large wave of students, the “baby boomers,” plus many for whom higher education had heretofore been out of reach. Three University of Maine presidents, Lloyd Elliott, H. Edwin Young, and Winthrop Libby, led the university through the sixties, addressing significant challenges and ...


Department Of History Symposium Series, Featuring Dr. Edward Baptist, University Of Maine Department Of History Oct 2015

Department Of History Symposium Series, Featuring Dr. Edward Baptist, University Of Maine Department Of History

Cultural Affairs Distinguished Lecture Series

As the only Ph.D.-granting department int he Humanities in the entire state, the History Department at the University of Maine plays a crucial role training humanists who staff cultural organizations throughout the state, including all other UMS campuses, and many faculty and staff positions at UMaine. The October 16 Lecture will bring an expert to campus to speak about the Morrill Land Grant act and how it transformed US values for the modern era.This lecture is a keystone in CLAS and UMHC programming for the Homecoming Weekend, and it will be followed by a CLAS alumni and ...


Teaching Literature In America: Demonstrating Relevance In The Early Cold War 1945-1963, Jennifer Chalmers May 2014

Teaching Literature In America: Demonstrating Relevance In The Early Cold War 1945-1963, Jennifer Chalmers

Honors College

This historical research focuses on how literature was taught in American high schools in the early Cold War period (1945-1963) and why it was taught that way. It aims to discover how the Cold War culture of conformity impacted secondary literature education. What were literature teachers’ concerns? What was the historical context of these concerns, and how did they affect methods in the classroom and rhetoric in academic journals? Finally, how did methodology and rhetoric change over time? Research involved gaining familiarity with Early Cold War culture, politics, and events through secondary sources; narrowing to U.S. education in the ...


A History Of Canadian Studies At The University Of Maine, Robert H. Babcock Jan 2009

A History Of Canadian Studies At The University Of Maine, Robert H. Babcock

Books

The purpose of this book is to explain the development of the Canadian Studies program at the University of Maine from its origins in the early 20th century to its position today as the most comprehensive program of its kind in the United States. Readers will learn how Maine's close proximity to Canada has spawned an ever-widening range of cross-border academic contacts rooted in mutual interests that are reinforced by collaborative academic study, which is benefiting residents on both sides of the international boundary.


From The Fair To The Laboratory: The Institutionalization Of Agricultural Science And Education In Maine, Thomas Reznick Jun 2008

From The Fair To The Laboratory: The Institutionalization Of Agricultural Science And Education In Maine, Thomas Reznick

Maine History

Up until the mid-nineteenth century, agricultural science and education in Maine were primarily local affairs. Meeting in farm clubs and attending agricultural fairs, the Maine farmer performed most research by trial and error and by meeting on common ground with other farmers to discuss what worked and what did not. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the farm clubs and county fairs waned and succumbed to the growing political influence of the Grange, which supported burgeoning agricultural scientific and educational institutions, such as the College of Agriculture and the Experiment Station. Through the auspices of the Grange, such institutions took the ...


“Catching Cannonballs”: Reflections On A Career As A History Teacher, Jerome Nadelhaft Mar 2000

“Catching Cannonballs”: Reflections On A Career As A History Teacher, Jerome Nadelhaft

Maine History

This essay was delivered as a plenary address at a conference for high school teachers on teaching history in Maine, held October 1997 at the University of Maine. Retiring History Professor Jerome Nadelhaft reflects on his career as colonial historian at the University of Maine and suggests that the mission of the history teacher is to impart an ethical sensibility to students.


The Crawford And Ella Peffer / Redpath Chautauqua Collection, William David Barry Mar 2000

The Crawford And Ella Peffer / Redpath Chautauqua Collection, William David Barry

Maine History

No abstract provided.


Education And The Rural Middle Class: Limington Academy, 1848-1860, Lynne Benoit-Vashon Oct 1998

Education And The Rural Middle Class: Limington Academy, 1848-1860, Lynne Benoit-Vashon

Maine History

The founding of academies in Maine during the early nineteenth-century expanded educational options for rural families, but academies also played an important role in the development of a rural middle class. In her study of Limington Academy, Lynne Benoit-Vachon finds that the school's by-laws, curriculum, course materials, and extra-curricular activities all worked to inculcate middle-class values of hard work, sobriety, self-improvement, and self-reliance in the Academy's young charges - training which would lead many of them into middle-class occupations beyond Limington’s borders. Benoit-Vachon, a graduate of the University of Maine, works as Education Programs Coordinator at the Currier ...


The Misses Martin’S School For Young Ladies Portland, Maine, 1803-1834, Yvonne Souliere Oct 1998

The Misses Martin’S School For Young Ladies Portland, Maine, 1803-1834, Yvonne Souliere

Maine History

During the Early Republic, education for the daughters of Portland's elite families usually included “ornamental” subjects such as needlework, music, and painting in addition to the “useful” subjects of reading history, arithmetic, and geography. This curriculum mirrored that of fashionable schools for young ladies in New York, Philadelphia, and, of course, Boston. The “Misses Martin's School for Young Ladies, ” opened in 1803 by the English “gentlewoman” Penelope Martin, instructed girls in “useful” and “ornamental ”subjects while also offering Portland’s best families the added cache of sending their daughters to a British-style boarding school for training as “proper ...


An Address Delivered Before The Penobscot Association Of Teachers And Friends Of Popular Education, At Bangor, Dec. 26, 1838, Joseph Cammet Lovejoy Jan 1839

An Address Delivered Before The Penobscot Association Of Teachers And Friends Of Popular Education, At Bangor, Dec. 26, 1838, Joseph Cammet Lovejoy

Maine Bicentennial

A pamphlet providing a view on public education in post-Colonial America as: "the science of rearing men, fitted to be useful members of society on earth, and for everlasting felicity in heaven."


Female Education, A Discourse, Delivered At The Dedication Of The Seminary Hall In Saugus, Jan. 15, 1822, To Which Is Added The Little Reckoner, Consisting Principally Of Arithmatical Questions For Infant Minds, Joseph Emerson Dec 1821

Female Education, A Discourse, Delivered At The Dedication Of The Seminary Hall In Saugus, Jan. 15, 1822, To Which Is Added The Little Reckoner, Consisting Principally Of Arithmatical Questions For Infant Minds, Joseph Emerson

Maine Bicentennial

That our sons may be as plants grown up in their youth; that our daughters may be as corner stones, polished after the similitude of a palace. --Psalm 144:12 (King James Version)

The literal import of this prayer, is, that our daughters may be qualified to till with dignity, propriety and usefulness, the important stations, which they may be called to occupy. But prayer, without corresponding exertion, is presumption. We are not to expect miracles. Something must be done, in order that females may attain that dignified and elevated rank in society, for which the God of nature, as ...