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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Murky Distinction Between Self-Concept And Self-Efficacy: Beware Of Lurking Jingle-Jangle Fallacies [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Philip D. Parker, Kou Murayama, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, A. Katrin Arens Jan 2019

The Murky Distinction Between Self-Concept And Self-Efficacy: Beware Of Lurking Jingle-Jangle Fallacies [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Philip D. Parker, Kou Murayama, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, A. Katrin Arens

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This study extends the classic constructive dialogue/debate between self-concept and self-efficacy researchers (Marsh, Roche, Pajares, & Miller, 1997) regarding the distinctions between these 2 constructs. The study is a substantive-methodological synergy, bringing together new substantive, theoretical, and statistical models and developing new tests of the classic jingle-jangle fallacy. We demonstrate that in a representative sample of 3,350 students from math classes in 43 German schools, generalized math self-efficacy and math outcome expectancies were indistinguishable from math self-concept, but were distinct from test-related and functional measures of self-efficacy. This is consistent with the jingle-jangle fallacies that are proposed. On the basis of pretest variables, we demonstrate negative frame-of-reference effects in social (big-fish-little-pond effect) and dimensional (internal/external frame-of-reference effect) comparisons for three self-concept-like constructs in each of the first 4 years of secondary school. In contrast, none of the frame-of-reference effects were significantly negative for either of the two self-efficacy-like constructs in any of the 4 years of testing. After controlling for pretest variables, each of the 3 self-concept-like constructs (math self-concept, outcome expectancy, and generalized math self-efficacy) in each of the 4 years of secondary school was more strongly related to posttest outcomes (school grades, test scores, future aspirations) than were the corresponding 2 self-efficacy-like factors. Extending discussion by Marsh et al. (1997), we clarify distinctions between self-efficacy and self-concept; the role of evaluation, worthiness, and outcome expectancy in self-efficacy measures; and complications in generalized and global measures of self-efficacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)


Inequity And Excellence In Academic Performance: Evidence From 27 Countries [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, John P. Jerrim, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke Aug 2018

Inequity And Excellence In Academic Performance: Evidence From 27 Countries [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, John P. Jerrim, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Research suggests that a country does not need inequity to have high performance. However, such research has potentially suffered from confounders present in between-country comparative research (e.g., latent cultural differences). Likewise, relatively little consideration has been given to whether the situation may be different for high- or low-performing students. Using five cycles of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) database, the current research explores within-country trajectories in achievement and inequality measures to test the hypothesis of an excellence/equity tradeoff in academic performance. We found negative relations between performance and inequality that are robust and of statistical and ...


Negative Year In School Effect: Extending Scope And Strengthening Causal Claims [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Felix Thoemmes, Nicholas Biddle Mar 2018

Negative Year In School Effect: Extending Scope And Strengthening Causal Claims [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Felix Thoemmes, Nicholas Biddle

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The Negative Year in School Effect (NYiSE) claims that grade-relative-to-age influences academic self-concept. Being young for your grade is associated with lower self-concept, whereas being old for your grade is associated with higher self-concept. We extend this research in several ways. First, we aim to improve causal claims for the NYiSE by utilizing birth month as an instrumental variable. Using the Longitudinal Study of Australian Youth we find that the NYiSE is negative under instrumental variable regression. Given that NYiSE has focused on math self-concept we show that the effect extends to other measures of math, general academic, and English ...


An Integrated Model Of Academic Self-Concept Development: Academic Self-Concept, Grades, Test Scores, And Tracking Over 6 Years [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Kou Murayama, A. Katrin Arens, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke Feb 2018

An Integrated Model Of Academic Self-Concept Development: Academic Self-Concept, Grades, Test Scores, And Tracking Over 6 Years [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Kou Murayama, A. Katrin Arens, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Our newly proposed integrated academic self-concept model integrates 3 major theories of academic self-concept formation and developmental perspectives into a unified conceptual and methodological framework. Relations among math self-concept (MSC), school grades, test scores, and school-level contextual effects over 6 years, from the end of primary school through the first 5 years of secondary school (a representative sample of 3,370 German students, 42 secondary schools, 50% male, M age at grade 5 = 11.75) support the (1) internal/external frame of reference model: Math school grades had positive effects on MSC, but the effects of German grades were negative ...


Validating The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (Copsoq-Ii) Using Set-Esem: Identifying Psychosocial Risk Factors In A Sample Of School Principals, Theresa Dicke, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip Riley, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Marcus Horwood Jan 2018

Validating The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (Copsoq-Ii) Using Set-Esem: Identifying Psychosocial Risk Factors In A Sample Of School Principals, Theresa Dicke, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip Riley, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Marcus Horwood

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

School principals world-wide report high levels of strain and attrition resulting in a shortage of qualified principals. It is thus crucial to identify psychosocial risk factors that reflect principals' occupational wellbeing. For this purpose, we used the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ-II), a widely used self-report measure covering multiple psychosocial factors identified by leading occupational stress theories. We evaluated the COPSOQ-II regarding factor structure and longitudinal, discriminant, and convergent validity using latent structural equation modeling in a large sample of Australian school principals (N = 2,049). Results reveal that confirmatory factor analysis produced marginally acceptable model fit. A novel approach we ...


Psychometric Validation Of The Parental Bonding Instrument In A U.K. Population–Based Sample: Role Of Gender And Association With Mental Health In Mid-Late Life, Man K. Xu, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Herbert W. Marsh, Marcus Richards, Peter B. Jones Jan 2018

Psychometric Validation Of The Parental Bonding Instrument In A U.K. Population–Based Sample: Role Of Gender And Association With Mental Health In Mid-Late Life, Man K. Xu, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Herbert W. Marsh, Marcus Richards, Peter B. Jones

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The factorial structure of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) has been frequently studied in diverse samples but no study has examined its psychometric properties from large, population-based samples. In particular, important questions have not been addressed such as the measurement invariance properties across parental and offspring gender. We evaluated the PBI based on responses from a large, representative population-based sample, using an exploratory structural equation modeling method appropriate for categorical data. Analysis revealed a three-factor structure representing “care,” “overprotection,” and “autonomy” parenting styles. In terms of psychometric measurement validity, our results supported the complete invariance of the PBI ratings across ...


Control-Value Appraisals, Enjoyment, And Boredom In Mathematics: A Longitudinal Latent Interaction Analysis [Accepted Manuscript], David W. Putwain, Reinhard Pekrun, Laura J. Nicholson, Wendy Symes, Sandra Becker, Herbert W. Marsh Jan 2018

Control-Value Appraisals, Enjoyment, And Boredom In Mathematics: A Longitudinal Latent Interaction Analysis [Accepted Manuscript], David W. Putwain, Reinhard Pekrun, Laura J. Nicholson, Wendy Symes, Sandra Becker, Herbert W. Marsh

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Based on the control-value theory of achievement emotions, this longitudinal study examined students’ control-value appraisals as antecedents of their enjoyment and boredom in mathematics. Self-report data for appraisals and emotions were collected from 579 students in their final year of primary schooling over three waves. Data were analyzed using latent interaction structural equation modeling. Control-value appraisals predicted emotions interactively depending on which specific subjective value was paired with perceived control. Achievement value amplified the positive relation between perceived control and enjoyment, and intrinsic value reduced the negative relation between perceived control and boredom. These longitudinal findings demonstrate that control and ...


Effects Of School-Average Achievement On Individual Self-Concept And Achievement: Unmasking Phantom Effects Masquerading As True Compositional Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Theresa Dicke, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Reinhard Pekrun, Jiesi Guo, Ioulia Televantou Jan 2018

Effects Of School-Average Achievement On Individual Self-Concept And Achievement: Unmasking Phantom Effects Masquerading As True Compositional Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Theresa Dicke, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Reinhard Pekrun, Jiesi Guo, Ioulia Televantou

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

School-average achievement is often reported to have positive effects on individual achievement (peer spillover effect). However, it is well established that school-average achievement has negative effects on academic self-concept (big-fish-little-pond effect [BFLPE]) and that academic self-concept and achievement are positively correlated and mutually reinforcing (reciprocal effects model). We resolve this theoretical paradox based on a large, longitudinal sample (N = 14,985 U.S. children) and improved methodology. More appropriate multilevel modeling that controls for phantom effects (due to measurement error and preexisting differences) makes the BFLPE even more negative, but turns the peer spillover effect from positive to slightly below ...


Cross-Cultural Generalizability Of Social And Dimensional Comparison Effects On Reading, Math, And Science Self-Concepts For Primary School Students Using The Combined Pirls And Timss Data [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Theresa Dicke Jan 2018

Cross-Cultural Generalizability Of Social And Dimensional Comparison Effects On Reading, Math, And Science Self-Concepts For Primary School Students Using The Combined Pirls And Timss Data [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Theresa Dicke

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Previous cross-cultural studies of social and dimensional comparison processes forming academic self-concepts (the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) and Internal-external frame-of-reference (I/E) models) have mostly been based on high-school students and two subject domains. Our study is the first to test the cross-cultural generalizability of both comparison processes across reading, mathematics, and science by combining of the TIMSS and PIRLS 2011 databases (15 OECD countries, 67,386 fourth-graders). Consistent with the I/E model, high achievement in mathematics/reading had positive effects on self-concept in the matching domain but negative effects in the non-matching domain. Extending the I/E model, students ...


Mentoring Interventions For Underrepresented Scholars In Biomedical And Behavioral Sciences: Effects On Quality Of Mentoring Interactions And Discussions, Vivian Lewis, Camille A. Martina, Michael P. Mcdermott, Linda Chaudron, Paula M. Trief, Jennifer G. Laguardia, Daryl Sharp, Steven R. Goodman, Gene D. Morse, Richard M. Ryan Jan 2017

Mentoring Interventions For Underrepresented Scholars In Biomedical And Behavioral Sciences: Effects On Quality Of Mentoring Interactions And Discussions, Vivian Lewis, Camille A. Martina, Michael P. Mcdermott, Linda Chaudron, Paula M. Trief, Jennifer G. Laguardia, Daryl Sharp, Steven R. Goodman, Gene D. Morse, Richard M. Ryan

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Mentors rarely receive education about the unique needs of underrepresented scholars in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. We hypothesized that mentor-training and peer-mentoring interventions for these scholars would enrich the perceived quality and breadth of discussions between mentor–protégé dyads (i.e., mentor–protégé pairs). Our multicenter, randomized study of 150 underrepresented scholar–mentor dyads compared: 1) mentor training, 2) protégé peer mentoring, 3) combined mentor training and peer mentoring, and 4) a control condition (i.e., usual practice of mentoring). In this secondary analysis, the outcome variables were quality of dyad time and breadth of their discussions. Protégé participants ...


Long-Term Positive Effects Of Repeating A Year In School: Six-Year Longitudinal Study Of Self-Beliefs, Anxiety, Social Relations, School Grades, And Test Scores [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Reinhard Pekrun, K. Murayama, Stephanie Lichtenfeld Jan 2017

Long-Term Positive Effects Of Repeating A Year In School: Six-Year Longitudinal Study Of Self-Beliefs, Anxiety, Social Relations, School Grades, And Test Scores [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Reinhard Pekrun, K. Murayama, Stephanie Lichtenfeld

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Consistently with a priori predictions, school retention (repeating a year in school) had largely positive effects for a diverse range of 10 outcomes (e.g., math self-concept, self-efficacy, anxiety, relations with teachers, parents and peers, school grades, and standardized achievement test scores). The design, based on a large, representative sample of German students (N = 1,325, M age = 11.75 years at Year 5) measured each year during the first 5 years of secondary school, was particularly strong. It featured 4 independent retention groups (different groups of students, each repeating 1 of the 4 first years of secondary school; total ...


Achievement Emotions And Academic Performance: Longitudinal Models Of Reciprocal Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Herbert W. Marsh, Kou Murayama, Thomas Goetz, Thomas Goetz Jan 2017

Achievement Emotions And Academic Performance: Longitudinal Models Of Reciprocal Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Herbert W. Marsh, Kou Murayama, Thomas Goetz, Thomas Goetz

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

A reciprocal effects model linking emotion and achievement over time is proposed. The model was tested using five annual waves of the Project for the Analysis of Learning and Achievement in Mathematics (PALMA) longitudinal study, which investigated adolescents’ development in mathematics (Grades 5–9; N = 3,425 German students; mean starting age = 11.7 years; representative sample). Structural equation modeling showed that positive emotions (enjoyment, pride) positively predicted subsequent achievement (math end‐of‐the‐year grades and test scores), and that achievement positively predicted these emotions, controlling for students’ gender, intelligence, and family socioeconomic status. Negative emotions (anger, anxiety, shame ...


Math Self-Concept, Grades, And Achievement Test Scores: Long-Term Reciprocal Effects Across Five Waves And Three Achievement Tracks [Accepted Manuscript], A. Katrin Arens, Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Kou Murayama, Rudolf Vom Hofe Jan 2017

Math Self-Concept, Grades, And Achievement Test Scores: Long-Term Reciprocal Effects Across Five Waves And Three Achievement Tracks [Accepted Manuscript], A. Katrin Arens, Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Kou Murayama, Rudolf Vom Hofe

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This study examines reciprocal effects between self-concept and achievement by considering a long time span covering grades 5 through 9. Extending previous research on the reciprocal effects model (REM), this study tests (1) the assumption of developmental equilibrium as time-invariant cross-lagged paths from self-concept to achievement and from achievement to self-concept, (2) the generalizability of reciprocal relations when using school grades and standardized achievement test scores as achievement indicators, and (3) the invariance of findings across secondary school achievement tracks. Math self-concept, school grades in math, and math achievement test scores were measured once each school year with a representative ...


Breaking The Double-Edged Sword Of Effort/Trying Hard: Developmental Equilibrium And Longitudinal Relations Among Effort, Achievement, And Academic Self-Concept [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Jisei Guo, A. Katrin Arens, Kou Murayama Jan 2016

Breaking The Double-Edged Sword Of Effort/Trying Hard: Developmental Equilibrium And Longitudinal Relations Among Effort, Achievement, And Academic Self-Concept [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Reinhard Pekrun, Stephanie Lichtenfeld, Jisei Guo, A. Katrin Arens, Kou Murayama

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Ever since the classic research of Nicholls (1976) and others, effort has been recognized as a double-edged sword: while it might enhance achievement, it undermines academic self-concept (ASC). However, there has not been a thorough evaluation of the longitudinal reciprocal effects of effort, ASC, and achievement, in the context of modern self-concept theory and statistical methodology. Nor have there been developmental equilibrium tests of whether these effects are consistent across the potentially volatile early-to-middle adolescence. Hence, focusing on mathematics, we evaluate reciprocal effects models (REMs) over the first 4 years of secondary school (grades 5–8), relating effort, achievement (test ...


Student Engagement And The Learning Incentive Program: Evidence And Applications, Joel Anderson Jan 2016

Student Engagement And The Learning Incentive Program: Evidence And Applications, Joel Anderson

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This paper presents the Learning Incentive Program (LIP), which is an innovative teaching resource designed to enhance a range of learning-relevant outcomes through increasing student engagement while maintaining intrinsic motivation. Specifically, the LIP involves interactive weekly online formative quizzes, primarily designed to encourage engagement. As incentive for regularly engaging in course content, completion of weekly tasks allows access to course materials for that topic (e.g., lecture notes can be obtained prior to the lecture as an incentive for engaging with the LIP). The LIP is theoretically informed, and this paper presents data supporting its effectiveness. Designed to encourage regular ...


The Quest For Comparability: Studying The Invariance Of The Teachers' Sense Of Self-Efficacy (Tses) Measure Across Countries, Ronny Scherer, Malte Jansen, Trude Nilsen, Shaljan Areepattamannil, Herbert Warren Marsh Jan 2016

The Quest For Comparability: Studying The Invariance Of The Teachers' Sense Of Self-Efficacy (Tses) Measure Across Countries, Ronny Scherer, Malte Jansen, Trude Nilsen, Shaljan Areepattamannil, Herbert Warren Marsh

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Teachers’ self-efficacy is an important motivational construct that is positively related to a variety of outcomes for both the teachers and their students. This study addresses challenges associated with the commonly used ‘Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES)’ measure across countries and provides a synergism between substantive research on teachers’ self-efficacy and the novel methodological approach of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM). These challenges include adequately representing the conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy in a measurement model (cross-loadings) and comparing means and factor structures across countries (measurement invariance). On the basis of the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey ...


Cross-Cultural Generalizability Of Year In School Effects: Negative Effects Of Acceleration And Positive Effects Of Retention On Academic Self-Concept [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh Jan 2016

Cross-Cultural Generalizability Of Year In School Effects: Negative Effects Of Acceleration And Positive Effects Of Retention On Academic Self-Concept [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Given that the Big-Fish-Little-Pond-Effect, the negative effect of school-average achievement on academic self-concept, is one of the most robust findings in educational psychology (Marsh, Seaton et al., 2007), this research extends the theoretical model, based on social comparison theory, to study relative year in school effects (e.g., being 1 school year ahead or behind same-age students) for math constructs in PISA2003 (276,165 15-year-old students from 10,274 schools across 41 countries). The effects on academic self-concept were negative for de facto acceleration (e.g., starting early or skipping grades) and positive for de facto retention (e.g., starting ...


Positive Behavior Interventions: The Issue Of Sustainability Of Positive Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Alexander S. Yeung, Rhonda G. Craven, Mary Mooney, Danielle Tracey, Katrina Barker, Anne Power, Brenda Dobia, Zhu Chen, Jill Schofield, Timothy J. Lewis Jan 2016

Positive Behavior Interventions: The Issue Of Sustainability Of Positive Effects [Accepted Manuscript], Alexander S. Yeung, Rhonda G. Craven, Mary Mooney, Danielle Tracey, Katrina Barker, Anne Power, Brenda Dobia, Zhu Chen, Jill Schofield, Timothy J. Lewis

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

During the last decade, positive behavior interventions have resulted in improvement of school behavior and academic gains in a range of school settings worldwide. Recent studies identify sustainability of current positive behavior intervention programs as a major concern. The purpose of this article is to identify future direction for effective implementation of positive behavior interventions based on a comprehensive review of the current status of positive behavior interventions in terms of sustainability. The review will also examine implementation fidelity, as a factor that impacts upon sustainability. Literature reviewed in this study demonstrates that administrator support and professional development were the ...


Temporal Ordering Effects Of Adolescent Depression, Relational Aggression, And Victimization Over Six Waves: Fully Latent Reciprocal Effects Models [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Rhonda Craven, Phil Parker, Roberto H. Parada, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Adel S. Abduljabbar Jan 2016

Temporal Ordering Effects Of Adolescent Depression, Relational Aggression, And Victimization Over Six Waves: Fully Latent Reciprocal Effects Models [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Rhonda Craven, Phil Parker, Roberto H. Parada, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Adel S. Abduljabbar

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The temporal ordering of depression, aggression, and victimization has important implications for theory, policy, and practice. For a representative sample of high school students (Grades 7–10; N = 3,793) who completed the same psychometrically strong, multiitem scales 6 times over a 2-year period, there were reciprocal effects between relational-aggression and relational-victimization factors: aggression led to subsequent victimization and victimization led to subsequent aggression. After controlling for prior depression, aggression, and victimization, depression had a positive effect on subsequent victimization, but victimization had no effect on subsequent depression. Aggression neither affected nor was affected by depression. The results suggest that ...


Probing The Unique Contributions Of Self-Concept, Task Values, And Their Interactions Using Multiple Value Facets And Multiple Academic Outcomes, Jiesi Guo, Benjamin Nagengast, Herbert Warren Marsh, Augustin Kelava, Hanna Gaspard, Holger Brandt, Jenna Cambria, Barbara Flunger, Anna-Lena Dicke, Isabelle Häfner, Brigitte Brisson, Ulrich Trautwein Jan 2016

Probing The Unique Contributions Of Self-Concept, Task Values, And Their Interactions Using Multiple Value Facets And Multiple Academic Outcomes, Jiesi Guo, Benjamin Nagengast, Herbert Warren Marsh, Augustin Kelava, Hanna Gaspard, Holger Brandt, Jenna Cambria, Barbara Flunger, Anna-Lena Dicke, Isabelle Häfner, Brigitte Brisson, Ulrich Trautwein

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Drawing on expectancy-value theory, the present study examined the unique contributions of the four major value beliefs and self-concept on achievement, self-reported effort, and teacher-rated behavioral engagement in mathematics. In particular, we examined the multiplicative effects of self-concept and task values on educational outcomes using the latent moderated structural equation approach. Participants were 1,868 German ninth-grade students. The data analyses relied on a higher-order structure of value beliefs, which is suited to parsing the differential patterns of predictive relations for different value beliefs. The findings revealed that (a) self-concept was more predictive of achievement, whereas value beliefs were more ...


Language Profiles And Literacy Outcomes Of Children With Resolving, Emerging, Or Persisting Language Impairments, Margaret J. Snowling, Fiona J. Duff, Hannah M. Nash, Charles Hulme Jan 2016

Language Profiles And Literacy Outcomes Of Children With Resolving, Emerging, Or Persisting Language Impairments, Margaret J. Snowling, Fiona J. Duff, Hannah M. Nash, Charles Hulme

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background: Children with language impairment ( LI ) show heterogeneity in development. We tracked children from pre-school to middle childhood to characterize three developmental trajectories: resolving, persisting and emerging LI. Methods: We analyzed data from children identified as having preschool LI, or being at family risk of dyslexia, together with typically developing controls at three time points: t1 ( age 3;09 ), t3 ( 5;08 ) and t5 ( 8;01 ). Language measures are reported at t1, t3 and t5, and literacy abilities at t3 and t5. A research diagnosis of LI ( irrespective of recruitment group ) was validated at t1 by a composite language score ...


Temporal Ordering Effects Of Adolescent Depression, Relational Aggression, And Victimization Over Six Waves: Fully Latent Reciprocal Effects Models [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Rhonda G. Craven, Phil D. Parker, Roberto H. Parada, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Adel S. Abduljabbar Jan 2016

Temporal Ordering Effects Of Adolescent Depression, Relational Aggression, And Victimization Over Six Waves: Fully Latent Reciprocal Effects Models [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Rhonda G. Craven, Phil D. Parker, Roberto H. Parada, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Adel S. Abduljabbar

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The temporal ordering of depression, aggression, and victimization has important implications for theory, policy, and practice. For a representative sample of high school students (Grades 7–10; N = 3,793) who completed the same psychometrically strong, multiitem scales 6 times over a 2-year period, there were reciprocal effects between relational-aggression and relational-victimization factors: aggression led to subsequent victimization and victimization led to subsequent aggression. After controlling for prior depression, aggression, and victimization, depression had a positive effect on subsequent victimization, but victimization had no effect on subsequent depression. Aggression neither affected nor was affected by depression. The results suggest that ...


Exploring Commitment And Turnover Intentions Among Teachers: What We Can Learn From Hong Kong Teachers [Accepted Manuscript], Dennis Mcinerney, Fraide A. Ganotice Jr., Ronnel B. King, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin Nov 2015

Exploring Commitment And Turnover Intentions Among Teachers: What We Can Learn From Hong Kong Teachers [Accepted Manuscript], Dennis Mcinerney, Fraide A. Ganotice Jr., Ronnel B. King, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This study examines the relationship between affective, normative, and continuance commitment of teachers to their profession and their organization, and turnover intentions. Hong Kong teachers (N = 1060) from religious and non-religious, English medium and Chinese medium of instruction, and band 1 and band 2 schools participated. Teachers from religious schools were higher in affective commitment to organization while teachers from non-religious schools were higher in normative commitment to profession. Teachers from EMI and band 1 schools were higher in affective and normative commitments while teachers from CMI and band 2 schools were higher in turnover intentions.


Achievement, Motivation, And Educational Choices: A Longitudinal Study Of Expectancy And Value Using A Multiplicative Perspective [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre J.S. Morin Aug 2015

Achievement, Motivation, And Educational Choices: A Longitudinal Study Of Expectancy And Value Using A Multiplicative Perspective [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre J.S. Morin

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Drawing on the expectancy-value model, the present study explored individual and gender differences in university entry and selection of educational pathway (e.g., science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] course selection). In particular, we examined the multiplicative effects of expectancy and task values on educational outcomes during the transition into early adulthood. Participants were from a nationally representative longitudinal sample of 15-year-old Australian youths (N = 10,370). The results suggest that (a) both math self-concept and intrinsic value interact in predicting advanced math course selection, matriculation results, entrance into university, and STEM fields of study; (b) prior reading achievement has ...


If One Goes Up The Other Must Come Down: Examining Ipsative Relationships Between Math And English Self-Concept Trajectories Across High School [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin, Marjorie Seaton, Brooke Van Zanden Jun 2015

If One Goes Up The Other Must Come Down: Examining Ipsative Relationships Between Math And English Self-Concept Trajectories Across High School [Accepted Manuscript], Philip D. Parker, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin, Marjorie Seaton, Brooke Van Zanden

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Background: The Internal-External frame of reference (IE) model suggests that as self-concept in one domain goes up (e.g., English) self-concept in other domains (e.g., mathematics) should go down (ipsative self-concept hypothesis). Aims: To our knowledge this assumption has not been tested. Testing this effect also provides a context for illustrating different approaches to the study of growth with longitudinal data. Sample: We use cohort sequential data from 2,781 of Year 7 to Year 11 Australian high school students followed across a total of 10 time waves 6 months apart. Method: Three different approaches to testing the ipsative ...


Directionality Of The Associations Of High School Expectancy-Value, Aspirations, And Attainment: A Longitudinal Study [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin, Philip D. Parker, Gurvinder Kaur Apr 2015

Directionality Of The Associations Of High School Expectancy-Value, Aspirations, And Attainment: A Longitudinal Study [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre Morin, Philip D. Parker, Gurvinder Kaur

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This study examines the directionality of the associations among cognitive assets (IQ, academic achievement), motivational beliefs (academic self-concept, task values), and educational and occupational aspirations over time from late adolescence (Grade 10) into early adulthood (5 years post high school). Participants were from a nationally representative sample of U.S. boys N = 2,213. The results suggest that (a) self-concept and intrinsic value have reciprocal effects with academic achievement and predict educational attainment, (b) self-concept is consistently found to predict occupational aspirations, (c) the associations between achievement and aspirations are partially mediated by motivational beliefs, and (d) academic self-concept in ...


The Internal/External Frame Of Reference Model Of Self-Concept And Achievement Relations: Age-Cohort And Cross-Cultural Differences [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Adel Salah Abduljabbar, Philip D. Parker, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Faisal Abdelfattah, Benjamin Nagengast, Jens Moller, Maher M. Abu-Hilal Feb 2015

The Internal/External Frame Of Reference Model Of Self-Concept And Achievement Relations: Age-Cohort And Cross-Cultural Differences [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Adel Salah Abduljabbar, Philip D. Parker, Alexandre J. S. Morin, Faisal Abdelfattah, Benjamin Nagengast, Jens Moller, Maher M. Abu-Hilal

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model and dimensional comparison theory posit paradoxical relations between achievement (ACH) and self-concept (SC) in mathematics (M) and verbal (V) domains; ACH in each domain positively affects SC in the matching domain (e.g., MACH to MSC) but negatively in the nonmatching domain (e.g., MACH to VSC). This substantive-methodological synergy based on latent variable models of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) data supports the generalizability of these predictions in relation to: mathematics and science domains, intrinsic motivation as well as self-concept, and age and nationality, based on nationally ...


Dimensional Comparison Theory: Paradoxical Relations Between Self-Beliefs And Achievements In Multiple Domains [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Oliver Ludtke, Benjamin Nagengast, Ulrich Trautwein, Adel Salah Abduljabbar,, Faisal A. Abdelfattah, Malte Jansen Feb 2015

Dimensional Comparison Theory: Paradoxical Relations Between Self-Beliefs And Achievements In Multiple Domains [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Oliver Ludtke, Benjamin Nagengast, Ulrich Trautwein, Adel Salah Abduljabbar,, Faisal A. Abdelfattah, Malte Jansen

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model posits paradoxical relations between achievement and self-concept in mathematics and verbal domains, in which achievement in each domain has a positive effect on self-concept in the matching domain (e.g., mathematics achievement on mathematics self-concept) but a negative (contrastive) effect on self-concept in the non-matching domain (e.g., mathematics achievement on verbal self-concept). Extending the I/E model, Dimensional Comparison Theory (DCT) posits that self-evaluations are based on dimensional comparisons (e.g., how my accomplishments in one domain compare with my accomplishments in another domain) as well as the more traditional ...


Expectancy-Value, Gender And Socioeconomic Background As Predictors Of Achievement [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Alexandre J. S. Morin Jan 2015

Expectancy-Value, Gender And Socioeconomic Background As Predictors Of Achievement [Accepted Manuscript], Jiesi Guo, Herbert W. Marsh, Philip D. Parker, Alexandre J. S. Morin

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

This study examined the relationship between mathematics expectancy (self-concept), value and student background variables in predicting educational outcomes. In particular, we investigated the effects of the interaction between expectancy and value on outcome variables and the mediating roles of expectancy and value. The research used data from the TIMSS database across three cohorts (1999, 2003, and 2007) to test an hypothesized model in Hong Kong, where the education system has experienced considerable changes over the period of these studies, and thus to provide a strong test of the generalizability of the findings. The results suggested that (a) gender difference in ...


Physical Self-Concept Changes In A Selective Sport High School: A Longitudinal Cohort-Sequence Analysis Of The Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre J.S. Morin, Philip D. Parker Jan 2015

Physical Self-Concept Changes In A Selective Sport High School: A Longitudinal Cohort-Sequence Analysis Of The Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect [Accepted Manuscript], Herbert W. Marsh, Alexandre J.S. Morin, Philip D. Parker

Faculty of Health Sciences Publications

Elite athletes and nonathletes (N = 1,268) attending the same selective sport high school (4 high school age cohorts, grades 7-10, mean ages varying from 10.9 to 14.1) completed the same physical self-concept instrument 4 times over a 2-year period (multiple waves). We introduce a latent cohort-sequence analysis that provides a stronger basis for assessing developmental stability/change than either cross-sectional (multicohort, single occasion) or longitudinal (single-cohort, multiple occasion) designs, allowing us to evaluate latent means across 10 waves spanning a 5-year period (grades 7-11), although each participant contributed data for only 4 waves, spanning 2 of the ...