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Educational Psychology

Utah State University

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

2014

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

Examining Psychological Inflexibility As A Transdiagnostic Process Across Psychological Disorders, Michael E. Levin, Chelsea Maclane, Susan Daflos, John R. Seeley, Steven C. Hayes, Anthony Biglan, Jacqueline Pistorello Jan 2014

Examining Psychological Inflexibility As A Transdiagnostic Process Across Psychological Disorders, Michael E. Levin, Chelsea Maclane, Susan Daflos, John R. Seeley, Steven C. Hayes, Anthony Biglan, Jacqueline Pistorello

Psychology Faculty Publications

The current cross-sectional study examined psychological inflexibility, a process in which behavior is rigidly guided by psychological reactions rather than direct contingencies or personal values, as a transdiagnostic process relevant to a range of depressive, anxiety, substance use and eating disorders. A sample of 972 first-year college students between 17 and 20 years of age completed self-report measures of psychological inflexibility and psychological distress as well as a structured diagnostic interview. Psychological inflexibility was significantly higher across a range of current and lifetime depressive and anxiety disorders as well as lifetime history of eating disorders, relative to students with no ...


Feasibility Of A Prototype Web-Based Acceptance And Commitment Therapy Prevention Program For College Students, Michael E. Levin, Jacqueline Pistorello, John R. Seeley, Steven C. Hayes Jan 2014

Feasibility Of A Prototype Web-Based Acceptance And Commitment Therapy Prevention Program For College Students, Michael E. Levin, Jacqueline Pistorello, John R. Seeley, Steven C. Hayes

Psychology Faculty Publications

Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students (n = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a waitlist with assessments conducted at baseline, post and 3-week follow-up. Waitlist participants accessed the program after the second assessment. Results: Program usability/usage data indicated high program acceptability. Significant improvements were found for ACT knowledge, education values and depression with ACT relative to waitlist. Subgroup analyses indicated ACT decreased depression and anxiety relative to waitlist among ...