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Full-Text Articles in Education

Effect Of Response Cards On Academic Outcomes, Ellen L. Duchaine Aug 2011

Effect Of Response Cards On Academic Outcomes, Ellen L. Duchaine

Communication Sciences and Disorders Dissertations

ABSTRACT

EFFECT OF RESPONSE CARDS ON ACADEMIC OUTCOMES FOR HIGH

SCHOOL STUDENTS WITHOUT DISABILITIES AND HIGH SCHOOL

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES WHO EXHIBIT

CHALLENGING BEHAVIORS

by

Ellen L. Duchaine

Response cards (RC) support effective teaching strategies such as maintaining a brisk

pace of instruction, increased opportunities to respond, immediate and frequent corrective

feedback, and high rates of behavior specific praise statements; all of which have been

effective in increasing student engagement for students with and without emotional and

behavioral disorders (E/BD) (Emmer & Stough, 2001; Simonsen et al., 2008; Sutherland,

Wehby, & Copeland, 2000). RC during academic instruction are successful in decreasing

disruptive behavior, increasing student participation, and increasing academic

achievement from the elementary school level to the university level. This study

examined teacher implementation of RC at the high school level for students without

disabilities and students with disabilities with a history of challenging behaviors (i.e.,

students with a disability and a behavior intervention plan) in general education classes

required for high school graduation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect

of RC compared to hand raising (HR) in inclusive general education classrooms. An

alternating treatment design was implemented to examine the potential functional relation

between the use of RC, student engagement, and academic achievement. RC (i.e., 8” x

11” laminated write

-on cards) were randomly alternated with the more traditional method

of HR which allows one student to respond to each question asked by the teacher.

Intervals of time on-task, attempted responses, next day quiz scores, and bi-weekly probe

scores were measured and analyzed for target students without disabilities and target

students with disabilities. In addition, individual scores of all students in the class were

calculated to provide a class mean, allowing further analysis. All sessions were conducted

by classroom teachers during daily reviews of academic content. The findings from this

study support prior research indicating RC increases student engagement by increasing

intervals of time on-task and attempted responses for the majority of students. In one

class, three of four target students increased daily quiz scores by 10% or more using RC;

and in the second class the mean for daily quiz scores was ...


Evaluating The Relationship Among Parents' Oral And Written Language Skills, The Home Literacy Environment, And Their Preschool Children's Emergent Literacy Skills, Nicole A. Taylor Aug 2011

Evaluating The Relationship Among Parents' Oral And Written Language Skills, The Home Literacy Environment, And Their Preschool Children's Emergent Literacy Skills, Nicole A. Taylor

Communication Sciences and Disorders Dissertations

Studies have examined the impact of parents’ educational level on their child’s emergent literacy skills and have found positive associations (Korat, 2009). However, a review of the literature indicates that previous studies have not investigated whether parents’ oral and written language skills relate to their child’s emergent oral and written language skills. This is important in light of the fact that parents’ educational level does not provide a complete picture of their academic skills (Greenberg, 1995). In addition to parental characteristics, the home literacy environment (HLE) is seen as important in the growth of children’s emergent literacy ...


Investigating A Model Of False Memory Construction: Is Seeing Believing?, Rebecca Bays May 2011

Investigating A Model Of False Memory Construction: Is Seeing Believing?, Rebecca Bays

Communication Sciences and Disorders Dissertations

In the current literature review I examine false memory research, including variables that affect memory accuracy, instrumentation, and analyses used to assess false memory construction, as well as possible frameworks accounting for the development of false memories. Do errors in memory occur during encoding of an event or during retrieval of a memory? I discuss two models of false memories, both born from the source-monitoring framework, to highlight the important cognitive processes leading to crucial errors in memory recall. In the study that follows I investigate whether repeated imaginings of an implausible autobiographical event will lead to the creation of ...


Naming Speed, Letter-Sound Automaticity, And Acquiring Blending Skills Among Students With Moderate Intellectual Disabilities, Dawn Davis May 2011

Naming Speed, Letter-Sound Automaticity, And Acquiring Blending Skills Among Students With Moderate Intellectual Disabilities, Dawn Davis

Communication Sciences and Disorders Dissertations

Students with moderate intellectual disabilities (MoID) typically are not taught decoding skills because they have difficulty mastering critical blending skills. In response to this skill deficit among students with MoID, an Initial Phonics instructional sequence was created that included student development of rapid and automatic retrieval of taught letter-sound correspondences to a level of mastery before teaching the skill of blending. For each of 16 students with MoID (ages 6-15), mastery criterion of letter-sound automaticity phases was determined by their individual naming speed as measured by the Rapid Object Naming (RON) subtest of the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing (CTOPP ...