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Educational Methods

University of Pennsylvania

1989

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Education

State Education Reform In The 1980s, University Of Pennsylvania Nov 1989

State Education Reform In The 1980s, University Of Pennsylvania

CPRE Policy Briefs

To shed light on these questions, in 1986 the Center for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) began a five-year study of the implementation and effects of state education reforms in six states chosen for their diverse approaches to reform: Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, and Pennsylvania.

Some findings from the first three years of this research were published by CPRE in a report, The Progress of Reform: An appraisal of State Education Initiatives, written by William A. Firestone, Susan H. Fuhrman and Michael W. Kirst. In writing the report, the authors relied to a great extent on research conducted by ...


Graduating From High School: New Standards In The States, University Of Pennsylvania Apr 1989

Graduating From High School: New Standards In The States, University Of Pennsylvania

CPRE Policy Briefs

This brief examines attempts by states to improve public education by increasing high school course requirements in 1989. According to a report published by the Center for Policy Research in Education, these attempts have had mixed results. As a result of the reforms, low-and middle-achieving students are taking more courses in science and math, but there are serious questions about the quality of the courses themselves. This issue of CPRE Policy Briefs is based on the report which was written with assistance from Paula White and Janice Patterson.


The Effects Of High School Organization On Dropping Out, Anthony S. Bryk, Yeow Meng Thum Feb 1989

The Effects Of High School Organization On Dropping Out, Anthony S. Bryk, Yeow Meng Thum

CPRE Policy Briefs

This paper examines the effects of school characteristics on both the probability of dropping out and the strongest predictor of dropping out - absenteeism. The authors employ a sub-sample from the High School and Beyond database which contains results of background questionnaires and standardized achievement tests given in 1980 to approximately 30,000 sophomores in 110 public and private high schools. The students, both those still in school as well as those who had dropped out, were resurveyed two years later. Supplemental school data were also obtained from principal questionnaires.