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Economics

2010

Publications 2010

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Education

A Little Now For A Lot Later: A Look At A Texas Advanced Placement Incentive Program, Clement (Kirabo) Jackson Dec 2009

A Little Now For A Lot Later: A Look At A Texas Advanced Placement Incentive Program, Clement (Kirabo) Jackson

C. Kirabo Jackson

The Texas Advanced Placement Incentive Program pays both students and teachers for passing grades on Advanced Placement (AP) exams. The program was implemented in schools serving primarily low-income, minority populations. Using a difference-in-differences strategy, I find that program adoption is associated with increased AP course enrollment and AP exam taking. Moreover, the program is associated with an increase in students scoring above 1100/24 on the SAT/ACT, and an increase in students matriculating in college. I find no evidence that the rewards distorted behaviors in undesirable ways. I present empirical evidence that teachers and students were not simply aiming ...


Do Students Benefit From Attending Better Schools?: Evidence From Rule-Based Student Assignments In Trinidad And Tobago, Clement (Kirabo) Jackson Dec 2009

Do Students Benefit From Attending Better Schools?: Evidence From Rule-Based Student Assignments In Trinidad And Tobago, Clement (Kirabo) Jackson

C. Kirabo Jackson

In Trinidad and Tobago students are assigned to secondary schools after fifth grade based on achievement tests, leading to large differences in the school environments to which students of differing initial levels of achievement are exposed. This paper uses instrumental variables based on the discontinuities created by the assignment mechanism, and exploits rich data which include the students’ test scores at entry and secondary school preferences to address self-selection bias. I find that attending a better school has large positive effects on examination performance at the end of secondary school. The effects are about twice as large for girls than ...