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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Teacher Education and Professional Development

2018

Eastern Illinois University

Economics

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

Teacher Interpretations Of Moneyskill®, Thomas Lucey, Elizabeth White, Aline André Apr 2018

Teacher Interpretations Of Moneyskill®, Thomas Lucey, Elizabeth White, Aline André

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

While much scholarship concerns the efforts to teach children and youth about personal finances, much less, if any, research concerns efforts of practicing teachers to evaluate and interpret financial curricula for schools. This paper conveys the results of a research study that interpreted teachers’ responses the high school modules associated with the Moneyskill® online education program. A convenience sample of teachers enrolled in a graduate level diversity course as a large teacher education institution in the Midwest completed assigned MoneySKILL modules and participated in group online reflections. Participants in the study interpreted the content as appropriate and relevant. They also ...


Review Of "Innovations In Economic Education: Promising Practices For Teachers And Students, K-16", Stephen H. Day Apr 2018

Review Of "Innovations In Economic Education: Promising Practices For Teachers And Students, K-16", Stephen H. Day

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

No abstract provided.


Curriculum Review: The Understanding Fiscal Responsibility Lesson Materials, Scott W. Dewitt, Nick Dilley Apr 2018

Curriculum Review: The Understanding Fiscal Responsibility Lesson Materials, Scott W. Dewitt, Nick Dilley

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

No abstract provided.


We Shall See: Critical Theory And Structural Inequality In Economics, Neil Graham Shanks Apr 2018

We Shall See: Critical Theory And Structural Inequality In Economics, Neil Graham Shanks

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

This paper seeks to provide educators with a critique of dominant narratives through the disciplinary tools of economics. Specifically; issues of race, gender, and geography are addressed via the common economic subjects of fiscal and monetary policy, economic indicators, wages, and economic growth. By providing a practical blueprint for a more critical curriculum in economics, these lessons and the literature that supports them demonstrates the potential of teachers to challenge taken-for-granted notions of what economics is and what it is for.


Teaching Unemployment Across The Curriculum, Natalia Smirnova Apr 2018

Teaching Unemployment Across The Curriculum, Natalia Smirnova

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

The Economics-Across-the-Curriculum approach encourages the integration of economic concepts into various disciplines. This paper describes several creative lesson ideas about teaching Unemployment which were field-tested by high-school teachers who attended a multi-day workshop at a not-for-profit institution in Massachusetts. We hope that these ideas will inspire high school teachers to try them in their classrooms. Any subject area can be a fruitful ground for the infusion of economics, economic text analyses, or quantitative literacy concepts.


Noodlenomics: Using Pool Noodles To Teach Supply And Demand, Jennifer Leigh Logan, Marsha Clayton Apr 2018

Noodlenomics: Using Pool Noodles To Teach Supply And Demand, Jennifer Leigh Logan, Marsha Clayton

The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies

Supply and demand is a fundamental part of economics at the junior high school, high school and college level. Although it is very important for students to understand and apply this analytical tool, many are turned off by the graph as well as the labels needed. This paper offers techniques for making supply and demand easier for students to comprehend. The classroom activities are mainly designed for teachers of middle school and high school economics, but can also be used as a fun and easy introduction to the concept in a college classroom as well.