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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Education

Assessing The Nature Of Science Views Of Singaporean Pre-Service Teachers, Tan L. Thye, Boo H. Kwen Nov 2004

Assessing The Nature Of Science Views Of Singaporean Pre-Service Teachers, Tan L. Thye, Boo H. Kwen

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Despite the many developments in the teaching of science, an aspect that continues to be neglected appears to be the character and nature of science (NOS). This is becoming especially important in the light of recent developments in pedagogy, as, for example, more teachers adopt constructivist methodologies and computing technology enables simulations that may blur the lines between models and reality. From the literature, it is known that teachers' modern NOS conceptions, though not a sufficient condition for transmission of modern NOS views, is necessary. In this study, pre-service teachers' NOS conceptions are assessed with an adapted Views of the ...


Towards Optimal Student Engagement In Teacher Education, Laurie Brady Nov 2004

Towards Optimal Student Engagement In Teacher Education, Laurie Brady

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

This article, written by a teacher educator who won an AUTC National Teaching Award in 2003, focuses on the strategies that might be used in teacher education programs as distinct from addressing subject matter concerns. Endorsing the need for optimal engagement, the article posits a model combining student centred learning (arguing that some strategies by their very nature require greater degrees of student exploration and interaction); problematic and situated learning which finds an ideal expression in case method; and more far reaching expressions of field -based experience including team teaching on site, mentoring and community based professional development


Reflection : Journals And Reflective Questions : A Strategy For Professional Learning, Maggie Clarke Nov 2004

Reflection : Journals And Reflective Questions : A Strategy For Professional Learning, Maggie Clarke

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Reflective journals have been used widely in teacher education programs to promote reflective thinking (Freidus, 1998; Carter & Francis, 2000; Yost, Senter & Forlenzo-Bailey, 2000). Smyth (1992) advocated that posing a series of questions to be answered in written journals could enhance reflective thinking. It was for this reason that reflective responses to directed questions were introduced in 2002 and subsequently in 2003 in the Bachelor of Education 4th year primary internship program at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. The internship program provided a sustained ten-week period of time in a school that afforded student teachers the opportunity to examine their practice in ...


Learning 'Through' Or Learning 'About'? The Ridiculous And Extravagant Medium Of Opera : Gardner's Multiple Intellegences In Pre-Service Teacher Education, Julie White, Mary Dixon, Lynda Smerdon Nov 2004

Learning 'Through' Or Learning 'About'? The Ridiculous And Extravagant Medium Of Opera : Gardner's Multiple Intellegences In Pre-Service Teacher Education, Julie White, Mary Dixon, Lynda Smerdon

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

In recent years, pre-service teacher education has attempted to incorporate into programs an understanding of Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences as it applies to schools. In this paper the tension between ‘learning about’ multiple intelligences and ‘learning through’ multiple intelligences supports Gardner’s (1993) distinction between ‘understanding’ and ‘coverage’. This paper examines the use of the performing arts in the professional studies component of our teacher education program. During 2002 at The University of Melbourne, a group of education students were offered the opportunity to develop an opera in order to learn about assessment and curriculum. Thirty-seven of the ...


Preservice Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs And Conceptions About Teaching And Learning : Cultural Implications For Research In Teacher Education., Kwok-Wai Chan Jun 2004

Preservice Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs And Conceptions About Teaching And Learning : Cultural Implications For Research In Teacher Education., Kwok-Wai Chan

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

Four epistemological belief and two teaching/learning conception dimensions were identified from a questionnaire study of a sample of Hong Kong preservice teacher education students. The epistemological belief dimensions were labelled Innate/Fixed Ability, Learning Effort/Process, Authority/Expert Knowledge and Certainty Knowledge. The somewhat different results on epistemological beliefs from Schommer’s findings with North American college students suggested the possible influence of cultural contexts. The teaching/learning conceptions were labeled Traditional and Constructivist Conceptions. MANOVA indicated no significant statistical differences across age, gender and elective groups in their epistemological beliefs and conceptions. Canonical Correlation Analysis showed significant relations ...


Is 'Education' Becoming Irrelevant In Our Research?, R, S. Webster Jun 2004

Is 'Education' Becoming Irrelevant In Our Research?, R, S. Webster

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

It is argued in this paper that in a culture of ‘performativity’ research into ‘education’ is often avoided. It is observed in many research publications that attention is given to techniques of learning, teaching, management, social equity, identity formation, leadership and delivery of the curriculum, without a justification being offered as to why such instrumental approaches should be regarded as being ‘educational’. Often research quite unproblematically adopts rational-economic justifications couched in terms of ‘efficiency’ and ‘effectiveness’. Such approaches are however identified as nihilistic and not educational (Blake et al., 2000)


Are Beginning Teachers With A Second Degree At A Higher Risk Of Early Career Burnout., Richard Goddard, Patrick O'Brien Jun 2004

Are Beginning Teachers With A Second Degree At A Higher Risk Of Early Career Burnout., Richard Goddard, Patrick O'Brien

Australian Journal of Teacher Education

This study investigated the impact that holding a second university degree has on levels of burnout that is reported by beginning teachers during their first year of employment. This research formed part of an ongoing investigation that aims to identify important elements relating to teacher well-being during the transition from university to a teaching career. One hundred and twenty three teachers responded to a mail survey six weeks after they commenced full-time teaching (T1) and again six months later (T2). On both occasions the survey included the Educators Survey version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI: Maslach, Jackson, & Leiter, 1996 ...


Facilitating Teacher Professional Learning : Analysing The Impact Of An Australian Professional Learning Model In Secondary Science, Rachel Sheffield Jan 2004

Facilitating Teacher Professional Learning : Analysing The Impact Of An Australian Professional Learning Model In Secondary Science, Rachel Sheffield

Theses: Doctorates and Masters

In education, innovations are frequently introduced to promote changes to the curriculum, teachers' practice, and the classroom environment, however, these initiatives are often implemented without sufficient evaluation to monitor their impact and effectiveness in bringing about the desired changes. This thesis analyses the impact of a teacher professional learning program on lower secondary science teachers' practice. It examines the relationship between teachers' concerns about the strategies incorporated in the Collaborative Australian Secondary Science Program (CASSP) and teachers' ability to understand the strategies, on their ability to utilise those strategies in the classroom. It also seeks to determine teachers' beliefs about ...