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Full-Text Articles in Education

Above-Level Test Item Functioning Across Examinee Age Groups, Russell Warne, Kristine Doty, Anne Marie Malbica, Victor Angeles, Scott Innes, Jared Hall, Kelli Masterson-Nixon Jan 2016

Above-Level Test Item Functioning Across Examinee Age Groups, Russell Warne, Kristine Doty, Anne Marie Malbica, Victor Angeles, Scott Innes, Jared Hall, Kelli Masterson-Nixon

Russell T Warne

Above-level testing (also called above-grade testing, out-of-level testing, and off-level testing) is the practice of administering to a child a test that is designed for an examinee population that is older or in a more advanced grade. Above-level testing is frequently used to help educators design educational interventions for gifted children, especially those who may be candidates for grade skipping or Talent Search programs. However, little research has been conducted on how test items function when administered to a younger population, despite professional standards that require examiners to gather validity evidence when administering a test for a new population. In ...


Five Reasons To Put The G Back Into Giftedness: An Argument For Applying The Cattell–Horn–Carroll Theory Of Intelligence To Gifted Education Research And Practice, Russell Warne Dec 2015

Five Reasons To Put The G Back Into Giftedness: An Argument For Applying The Cattell–Horn–Carroll Theory Of Intelligence To Gifted Education Research And Practice, Russell Warne

Russell T Warne

Human intelligence (also called general intelligence, g, or Spearman’s g) is a highly useful psychological construct. Yet, since the middle of the 20th century, gifted education researchers have been reluctant to discuss human intelligence. The purpose of this article is to persuade gifted education researchers and practitioners to reincorporate modern human intelligence theory (as expressed in Cattell–Horn–Carroll, or CHC, theory) and research into their work on gifted children. There are five reasons to make intelligence part of gifted education research: (a) intelligence is one of the best studied constructs in psychology; (b) educators know more about how ...