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Social History

Rowan Cahill

Articles

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Education

Behind The Rhetoric, Rowan Cahill Dec 2000

Behind The Rhetoric, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A contemporary critical account of changes taking place in the NSW state education system in the late 1990s-2001 under the leadership of Dr. Ken Boston, Director-General of Education and Training in NSW. The author argues that Boston's 'devolution' rhetoric masks a determined conservative and Rightist push to politically and ideologically centralise the education system and in the process emasculate teacher initiative, imagination, and enterprise.


Student Power, Rowan Cahill Aug 1968

Student Power, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Contemporary account by a participant-observer of the upsurge in 1968 of student activism on Australian university campuses, with particular emphasis on the concepts of 'student power' and 'democratisation'. The article is both a background piece, and a critique of the Australian university system and its operation at the time.


The Student Mood: Sydney University, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving Dec 1967

The Student Mood: Sydney University, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving

Rowan Cahill

A discussion published in 1968 by Cahill and Irving about student unrest in the universities of Australia, with specific reference to the situation existing at the time in Sydney University. At the time, Cahill was a prominent student radical completing his BA (Honours) degree and Irving was an activist-academic.


The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner Oct 1967

The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner

Rowan Cahill

Authored alphabetically by R. Cahill, R. Connell, B. Freeman, T. Irving, and B. Scribner, “The Lost Ideal” was published in the Sydney University student newspaper 'honi soit' on Tuesday, 3 October 1967. It was the foundation manifesto of what was to become known as the Free U, initially operating out of rented premises in Redfern (Sydney) before moving to premises in nearby suburbs. The first Free U courses commenced in December 1967, and early in the new year involved 150 people. At its peak, during the summer of 1968-1969, over 300 people were involved in courses. The Sydney experiment, which ...