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Full-Text Articles in Education

Dynamics Of No Child Left Behind Policy Impacting Reading Education Practices In Kindergarten In The United States Of America, Guang-Lea Lee, Joanne K. Sullivan, Abha Gupta Jan 2011

Dynamics Of No Child Left Behind Policy Impacting Reading Education Practices In Kindergarten In The United States Of America, Guang-Lea Lee, Joanne K. Sullivan, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

The Commonwealth of Virginia is used as a representative case to illustrate the implication of federal policy on reading education practices in kindergarten in the United States of America. While Virginia follows the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) policy, it allows local school districts to create innovative instructional and assessment practices that can match the needs of each child. Teachers in Virginia experience a wide range of emergent reading skills in kindergarten inclusive classrooms filled with children of diverse backgrounds and abilities. However, highly qualified teachers try to meet the state Standards of Learning through working side-by-side with children ...


Emerging Theoretical Models Of Reading Through Authentic Assessments Among Preservice Teachers: Two Case Studies, Eileen S. Oboler, Abha Gupta Jan 2010

Emerging Theoretical Models Of Reading Through Authentic Assessments Among Preservice Teachers: Two Case Studies, Eileen S. Oboler, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

This two-part study examines the emerging understanding of the reading process among preservice teachers (PTs), enrolled in a teacher preparation course on diagnostic reading. The study focuses on the use of reading assessment tools to understand the process of reading, while using reading inventories for diagnostic as well as pedagogical purposes' PTs' self-reflections support a developing insight into the reading process. Through the process of inquiry and self-reflections, PTs discovered critical issues related to literacy, namely, metacognition, prior knowledge, cultural factors, instructional implications, and content area reading. These findings have implications for the teaching of reading as inquiry-based instruction, enabling ...


Effects Of On-Site Reading Clinical Tutoring On Children's Performance, Abha Gupta Sep 2004

Effects Of On-Site Reading Clinical Tutoring On Children's Performance, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

This research was conducted to study the effects of field-based clinical tutoring on struggling readers. Struggling readers from two grade levels, 3rd and 5th were randomly divided into two groups. One group received individualized tutoring in reading for a semester from apprentice reading clinicians (graduate students in Reading Program) and the other group did not. There were 13 sessions of one hour each per week. The reading performance of students in the two groups was compared on the two available measures in the school, (1) letter grade and (2) STAR results (a computerized diagnostic reading assessment program). Observational and anecdotal ...


The Government's Efforts To Improve Reading Of Young Children, Lea Lee, Abha Gupta Jun 2003

The Government's Efforts To Improve Reading Of Young Children, Lea Lee, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

Reviews four major federal initiatives to improve early reading and literacy programs in the U.S.: Title One Reading program, the Reading Excellence Act, Even Start Family Literacy Program, and the Leave No Child Behind Act. Concludes that these expensive reading programs have not been very successful.


What's Up Wif Ebonics, Y'All?, Abha Gupta Jun 1999

What's Up Wif Ebonics, Y'All?, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

This paper examines the controversy surrounding the use of Ebonics among African American students in schools in the United States, with a twofold purpose: (1) to focus on the primary function of language as a tool of communication that varies in its use according to the social context; and (2) to provide suggestions to teachers of ways to support students' acquisition of standard English without devaluing the nonstandard variants they may have learned in their homes and communities. The discussion is highlighted in the paper with classroom stories, anecdotes, and vignettes. The paper contains the following sections: Introduction; The Ebonics ...


Kidwatching Going Beyond The Language Of The Test, Abha Gupta Jan 1992

Kidwatching Going Beyond The Language Of The Test, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

A study examined the linguistic forms in the discourse of speakers during a language test to indicate why they use certain specific forms over others. Ten children were given the Grammatical Analysis of Elicited Language--Simple Sentence Level Test (GAEL), a language proficiency test for hearing-impaired children in the age group of 4 to 8 years. Three students were videotaped during administration of the test, and the other students' final responses (omitting the intermediate discourse) were recorded. Some of the test items on which the maximum number of children deviated from the target response were analyzed for common traits and classified ...


Role Of Imitation In Language Assessment Tests, Abha Gupta Jan 1992

Role Of Imitation In Language Assessment Tests, Abha Gupta

Teaching & Learning Faculty Publications

A study investigated whether imitation plays a significant role in the acquisition of grammar. Three 6- to 8-year-old hearing-impaired children were administered the Grammatical Analysis of Elicited Language--Simple Sentence Level Test (GAEL), which is designed to evaluate hearing-impaired children's use of grammatical aspects of spoken and/or signed English. Subjects' verbal responses to the "imitated" component (in which subjects were asked to say just what the tester said) of the GAEL were transcribed and analyzed. Results indicated that imitated speech is neither longer nor grammatically more advanced than non-imitated, spontaneous speech. Findings suggest that the children produced "unique" language ...