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Gender

ADVANCE Library Collection

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Full-Text Articles in Education

Tri-Council For Gender Programs: History, Carol Strong, Pamela Riley, Janet Osborne Mar 2010

Tri-Council For Gender Programs: History, Carol Strong, Pamela Riley, Janet Osborne

ADVANCE Library Collection

No abstract provided.


Why Are There Fewer Women In Engineering?, Sue Ellen Haupt Jan 2005

Why Are There Fewer Women In Engineering?, Sue Ellen Haupt

ADVANCE Library Collection

This paper attempts to explain the paucity of women in engineering. While the percentage of women entering engineering and science careers has been increasing, the number at higher ranks has not increased as quickly, after considering the appropriate time lag. The differences in tenure rate due to gender alone were statistically insignificant. Instead, these were attributed to the fact that women who are married or have children are less successful than are men with matching characteristics. One solution proposed is to recognize that priorities might be different at differing stages of family life. It is also important to encourage more ...


Righting The Balance: Gender Diversity In The Geosciences, Robin E. Bell, Kim A. Kastens Jan 2004

Righting The Balance: Gender Diversity In The Geosciences, Robin E. Bell, Kim A. Kastens

ADVANCE Library Collection

The blatant barriers are down. Women are now routinely chief scientists on major cruises, lead field parties to all continents, and have risen to leadership positions in professional organizations, academic departments, and funding agencies. Nonetheless, barriers remain. Women continue to be under-represented in the Earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences.


What Works For Women In Undergraduate Physics?, Barbara L. Whitten, Suzanne R. Foster, Margaret L. Ducombe Jan 2003

What Works For Women In Undergraduate Physics?, Barbara L. Whitten, Suzanne R. Foster, Margaret L. Ducombe

ADVANCE Library Collection

The predominance of men in physics remains a puzzle. To attract talented women and minorities, the culture of college physics needs a makeover. In 1998, women received about 40% of the bachelor's degrees in mathematics and chemistry, but only 19% of the bachelor's in physics. That underrepresentation worsens at higher levels: The same year, women constituted 13% of physics PhD recipients and 8% of physics faculty members.(1) According to NSF, the community of working PhD-level physicists in 2000 was 84% white and 93% male.(2) What accounts for such stark numbers?


The Effects Of Gender Composition In Academic Departments On Faculty Turnover, Pamela S. Tolbert, Tal Simons, Alice Andrews, Jaehoon Rhee Jan 1995

The Effects Of Gender Composition In Academic Departments On Faculty Turnover, Pamela S. Tolbert, Tal Simons, Alice Andrews, Jaehoon Rhee

ADVANCE Library Collection

Using data collected from a sample of 50 academic departments over the years 1977-88, the authors test several hypotheses about the effects of departmental gender composition on faculty turnover. They find that as the proportion of women in a department grew, turnover among women also increased, confirming the prediction that increases in the relative size of a minority will result in increased intergroup competition and conflict. The evidence also suggests, however, that when the proportion of female faculty reached a threshold of about 35-40%, turnover among women began to decline. The proportion of women had a negligible or negative impact ...


Status Of Women Committee, Helen Lundstrom, Karen Morse, Jane Lott, Alison Thorne Jan 1976

Status Of Women Committee, Helen Lundstrom, Karen Morse, Jane Lott, Alison Thorne

ADVANCE Library Collection

No abstract provided.