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Loyola Marymount University and Loyola Law School

Latino students

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Full-Text Articles in Education

The Journey From Welcoming To Belonging: Stories Of A New Principal In A Latino Community, Corena Marasco Jan 2016

The Journey From Welcoming To Belonging: Stories Of A New Principal In A Latino Community, Corena Marasco

Journal of Catholic Education

From Catholic education’s inception in the United States, Catholic schools were established for the immigrant population and the leadership was successful at building enrollment with the high European immigrant populations. At this point in United States history, Catholic education is in need of innovative change, especially in regard to attracting the Latino community, the largest Catholic group, to Catholic schools. In this study, I detailed my own journey as a new, first time, first year, Catholic school principal in a 100% Latino environment, where I was welcomed by a Latino community, eventually leading me to a deep sense of ...


Brotherhood, Social Justice, And Persistent Deficit Ideologies: Latino Students’ Experiences In An All-Male Catholic High School, Ursula S. Aldana Jan 2016

Brotherhood, Social Justice, And Persistent Deficit Ideologies: Latino Students’ Experiences In An All-Male Catholic High School, Ursula S. Aldana

Journal of Catholic Education

Declining Catholic school enrollment rates coupled with increasing numbers of Latino Catholics (in the US) have prompted Catholic leaders to interrogate how they can best engage and meet the needs of the Latino community (Ospino, 2014; Notre Dame Task Force, 2009). Much of this work focuses on how Catholic schools can attract Latino students and their families, but does not situate the Latino Catholic school student experience within the historical, economic and sociopolitical context. This paper interrogates the history and experiences of Latino students at Divinity High School (pseudonym), an all male Catholic high school that has historically served a ...


¿Es Su Escuela Nuestra Escuela? Latino Access To Catholic Schools, Father Joseph V. Corpora, Luis R. Fraga Jan 2016

¿Es Su Escuela Nuestra Escuela? Latino Access To Catholic Schools, Father Joseph V. Corpora, Luis R. Fraga

Journal of Catholic Education

In this essay we use the framework of ideas, interests, and institutions to analyze the opportunities and challenges that confront Latino families and Catholic schools as they work to increase Latino enrollment. There are many ideas as to what to do to increase Latino enrollment. It is also apparent that it is in the interests of both Latino families and Catholic schools to have greater Latino enrollment. Despite the challenges of putting these ideas and interests into practice through institutional transformation, there is clear evidence that successful efforts continue to be made to increase Latino enrollment. Nonetheless, this progress seems ...


Moving Beyond The College-Preparatory High School Model To A College-Going Culture In Urban Catholic High Schools, Ursula S. Aldana Apr 2014

Moving Beyond The College-Preparatory High School Model To A College-Going Culture In Urban Catholic High Schools, Ursula S. Aldana

Journal of Catholic Education

A college-going culture has been found to improve academic outcomes for underrepresented high school students (Allen, Kimura-Walsh, & Griffin, 2009; Stanton-Salazar, 2010). The research on Catholic high schools shows their college-preparatory environment ability to produce successful outcomes for African-American and Latino students (Bryk, Lee, & Holland, 1993). This study examines two urban Catholic high schools and how they construct opportunities for low-income Latino and African-American male students. The year-long study draws from 1) ethnographic field notes; 2) interviews with students and staff; 3) survey and 4) student data. Data suggests that although both schools focused on preparing students for college, only one maintained a college-going culture through its college-going discourse which better served the needs of its underrepresented students.