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Full-Text Articles in Education

Body And Disease 2008: An Integrated Course Teaching Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology And Microbiology, Janil Puthucheary, Doyle Graham, Charles A. Gullo Phd, Hwang Nina Chih, Lynette Oon, Tan Soo Yong, Sandy Cook Mar 2019

Body And Disease 2008: An Integrated Course Teaching Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology And Microbiology, Janil Puthucheary, Doyle Graham, Charles A. Gullo Phd, Hwang Nina Chih, Lynette Oon, Tan Soo Yong, Sandy Cook

Charles Gullo

The Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) Body and Disease course is a 20-week, integrated course occurring at the end of the first year. The course covers four basic science topics: Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Microbiology and is modelled after the same course from the Duke University School of Medicine (DSOM) in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The structure of the course, as delivered by DSOM, was adapted to meet the needs and structure of the Duke-NUS programme. In addition, the course was adapted significantly to incorporate the Team-Based Learning methodology. In this paper, we detail how we approached these unique ...


A Meta-Analytic Perspective On The Valid Use Of Subjective Human Judgement To Make Medical School Admission Decisions., Clare Kreiter, Marie O'Shea, Catherine Bruen, Paul J. Murphy, Teresa Pawlikowska Dec 2018

A Meta-Analytic Perspective On The Valid Use Of Subjective Human Judgement To Make Medical School Admission Decisions., Clare Kreiter, Marie O'Shea, Catherine Bruen, Paul J. Murphy, Teresa Pawlikowska

Medical Education/Health Professions Education Articles

While medical educators appear to believe that admission to the medical school should be governed, at least in part, by human judgement, there has been no systematic presentation of evidence suggesting it improves selection. From a fair testing perspective, legal, ethical, and psychometric considerations, all dictate that the scientific evidence regarding human judgement in selection should be given consideration. To investigate the validity of using human judgements in admissions, multi-disciplinary meta-analytic research evidence from the wider literature is combined with studies from within medical education to provide evidence regarding the fairness and validity of using interviews and holistic review in ...


Engaging Stakeholders In Collaborative And Constructive Course Evaluation, Roger Jerabek, Rebecca Hartley, Nancy Shane, Renee Quintana Sep 2018

Engaging Stakeholders In Collaborative And Constructive Course Evaluation, Roger Jerabek, Rebecca Hartley, Nancy Shane, Renee Quintana

HSC Education Day

Implementing a coherent and coordinated curriculum, which prepares students for licensure exams and subsequent phases of their training, requires the concerted expertise and efforts of diverse stakeholders, including administrators, faculty, staff, and students. The Office of Program Evaluation, Education and Research (PEAR) is responsible for student evaluations of courses at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine (SOM). In 2016, members of PEAR collaborated with the SOM Curriculum Committee to restructure the preclinical course review process to engage committee members more fully in monitoring courses. This poster summarizes evaluation processes, shares information on how other medical schools review preclinical ...


Developing A Global Health Assessment Collaboration: Ancillary Report, Daniel Edwards, Jacob Pearce, David Wilkinson Aug 2018

Developing A Global Health Assessment Collaboration: Ancillary Report, Daniel Edwards, Jacob Pearce, David Wilkinson

Dr Daniel Edwards

This document reports on a project designed to develop an assessment collaboration between medical schools in both Australia and the United Kingdom. The project was funded by the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT), utilising surplus funding from a broader assessment collaboration project – the Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration (OLT ID12-2482). The Global Health Assessment Collaboration (GHAC) involved five universities in Australia and the United Kingdom (UK). It developed an assessment framework and item specifications, undertook assessment item drafting workshops, built in a process of review and resulted in the development of a focused suite of assessment items. This report provides ...


Teaching Healthcare Ethics Students How To Cope With Gun Violence, Peter G. Holub Jan 2018

Teaching Healthcare Ethics Students How To Cope With Gun Violence, Peter G. Holub

Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice

Buchbinder (2017) provides assignments for Financial Management, Epidemiology, Health Policy, Leadership, and Human Resources classes to help students process the physical and emotional effects of gun violence in America. The following additional assignments are provided for bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral level Medical Ethics classes.


Cognitive Load Theory: Applications In Medical Education, Adam W. Wissman Jan 2018

Cognitive Load Theory: Applications In Medical Education, Adam W. Wissman

Technical Communication Capstone Course

This article examines how cognitive load theory can help instructional designers in medical education design material and content to best suit their audience. Through the examination of schema construction, working and long-term memory, biologically primary/secondary knowledge, and novice and experienced learners, this article proposes instructional design best practices. This article separates these best practices into three categories: activities, pre-lecture resources, and teaching strategies, which can be applied to either novice learners or experienced learners.


Student Assessment Methods Used In Undergraduate Medical Education, Christine Savi Oct 2017

Student Assessment Methods Used In Undergraduate Medical Education, Christine Savi

Fort Worth M.D. School

This document outlines student assessment methods used in undergraduate medical education. It highlights the strengths and limitations of each method, lists relevant competency domains and indicates whether the method is formative or summative. Assessment methods highlighted include authentic assessment, case presentation, chart review, direct observation, discussion, interactive computer assessment, journal, Mini-CEX (Clinical Evaluation Exercise), verbal examination, OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination), peer assessment, portfolio, Script Concordance Test (SCT), self-assessment, reflection, simulation, small group interaction, survey, questionnaire, written examination (multiple choice or short answer), written log or prescription, checklist, rating scale, rubric and narrative response.


Create And Teach An Elective? Me? Overcoming Fear Of New Roles, Alexandra Gomes, Laura Abate, Thomas Harrod Oct 2017

Create And Teach An Elective? Me? Overcoming Fear Of New Roles, Alexandra Gomes, Laura Abate, Thomas Harrod

Himmelfarb Library Faculty Posters and Presentations

: Inquiries about new informatics instructional opportunities in the curriculum led to a suggestion that the librarians submit an elective proposal. Despite knowing nothing about the approval process or the responsibilities of being a course director, several librarians accepted the challenge as a learning experience. Developing the proposal included writing the proposal, formally presenting it to two curriculum committees for approval, and then creating the specific lesson plans, identifying associated readings, creating a grading rubric and syllabus, and teaching the specific elective sessions. Librarians developed the elective Introduction to Systematic Reviews and are in the process of developing a second elective


Investigating A Self-Scoring Interview Simulation For Learning And Assessment In The Medical Consultation., Catherine Bruen, Clarence Kreiter, Vincent Wade, Teresa Pawlikowska May 2017

Investigating A Self-Scoring Interview Simulation For Learning And Assessment In The Medical Consultation., Catherine Bruen, Clarence Kreiter, Vincent Wade, Teresa Pawlikowska

Medical Education/Health Professions Education Articles

Experience with simulated patients supports undergraduate learning of medical consultation skills. Adaptive simulations are being introduced into this environment. The authors investigate whether it can underpin valid and reliable assessment by conducting a generalizability analysis using IT data analytics from the interaction of medical students (in psychiatry) with adaptive simulations to explore the feasibility of adaptive simulations for supporting automated learning and assessment. The generalizability (G) study was focused on two clinically relevant variables: clinical decision points and communication skills. While the G study on the communication skills score yielded low levels of true score variance, the results produced by ...


Many Hands Make Light Work: Crowdsourced Ratings Of Medical Student Osce Performance, Mark Grichanik Apr 2017

Many Hands Make Light Work: Crowdsourced Ratings Of Medical Student Osce Performance, Mark Grichanik

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Clinical skills are often measured using objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) in healthcare professions education programs. As with assessment centers, it is challenging to provide learners with effective feedback due to burdensome human capital demands. The aim of this dissertation was to evaluate the viability of using a crowdsourced system to gather OSCE ratings and feedback. Aggregating evaluations of student performance from a crowd of patient proxies has the potential to mitigate biases associated with single-rater evaluations, allow the patient a voice as the consumer of physician behavior, improve reliability, reduce costs, improve feedback latency, and help learners develop a ...


Frederick_Terry_Abmsconfernece2017_Presentation Making It Stick~9.21.2017tf.Pptx, Theresa Frederick Dec 2016

Frederick_Terry_Abmsconfernece2017_Presentation Making It Stick~9.21.2017tf.Pptx, Theresa Frederick

Terry Frederick

How to make learning stick by forcing active participation even on line


An Examination Of Cultural Competence Training In Us Medical Education Guided By The Tool For Assessing Cultural Competence Training, Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan Oct 2016

An Examination Of Cultural Competence Training In Us Medical Education Guided By The Tool For Assessing Cultural Competence Training, Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of “cultural competence,” upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in systems, organizations, and among professionals to enable effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify ...


Challenges Experienced By Korean Medical Students And Tutors During Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective, Hyunjung Ju, Ikseon Choi, Byoung Doo Rhee, Jong Tae-Lee May 2016

Challenges Experienced By Korean Medical Students And Tutors During Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective, Hyunjung Ju, Ikseon Choi, Byoung Doo Rhee, Jong Tae-Lee

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean medical school participated in interviews. The interview data were analyzed using the constant comparative method and classified according to Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. Twenty-two themes emerged within the following overarching categories: large power distance (6 themes), high uncertainty avoidance (6), individualism (3), collectivism (4), and masculinity/short-term orientation (3). This ...


Justice And Care: Decision Making Of Medical School Student Promotions Committees, Emily Paige Green Jan 2016

Justice And Care: Decision Making Of Medical School Student Promotions Committees, Emily Paige Green

Educational Studies Dissertations

Accreditation standards for allopathic medical schools in the United States require that each institution have in place a mechanism by which student progress through the curriculum is monitored. These entities, referred to here as promotions committees, make important decisions in a high stakes medical education environment. Yet little is currently known about how promotions committee members make decisions about students who experience academic failures and lapses in professional behavior. Using the work of Lawrence Kohlberg and Carol Gilligan on moral development as a theoretical basis, the purpose of this study was to elucidate committee members’ perceptions of the role of ...


Developing A Global Health Assessment Collaboration: Ancillary Report, Daniel Edwards, Jacob Pearce, David Wilkinson Jan 2016

Developing A Global Health Assessment Collaboration: Ancillary Report, Daniel Edwards, Jacob Pearce, David Wilkinson

Higher Education Research

This document reports on a project designed to develop an assessment collaboration between medical schools in both Australia and the United Kingdom. The project was funded by the Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT), utilising surplus funding from a broader assessment collaboration project – the Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration (OLT ID12-2482). The Global Health Assessment Collaboration (GHAC) involved five universities in Australia and the United Kingdom (UK). It developed an assessment framework and item specifications, undertook assessment item drafting workshops, built in a process of review and resulted in the development of a focused suite of assessment items. This report provides ...


“I Just Need To Get Myself Supervised:” Exploring Transformative Learning In The Development Of Professionalism Among Physicians In The First Year Of Graduate Medical Education, Elizabeth P. Marlowe Jan 2016

“I Just Need To Get Myself Supervised:” Exploring Transformative Learning In The Development Of Professionalism Among Physicians In The First Year Of Graduate Medical Education, Elizabeth P. Marlowe

Theses and Dissertations

The study explored the learning experiences of first-year resident physicians during the first year of graduate medical education. The experiences of four intern physicians in the first year of residency training at an urban academic health system provided the site for the research. An exploratory case study research design was employed to examine the learning experiences of these new physicians. A qualitative approach was used to analyze data from interviews and ethnographic observations. The findings of this research study provide evidence surrounding how and what these physician trainees learned regarding professionalism during the first year of residency training.

The findings ...


The Role Of Transformative Learning In Fostering Identity Development Among Learners In Professional Education Programs Of Study, Elizabeth P. Marlowe, Teresa J. Carter Jan 2016

The Role Of Transformative Learning In Fostering Identity Development Among Learners In Professional Education Programs Of Study, Elizabeth P. Marlowe, Teresa J. Carter

Adult Education Research Conference

This roundtable discussion engages participants in exploring how professional identity develops for learners engaged in advanced professional education and how they experience the meaning of what it is to become a professional.


Women In White: A Retrospective Look At Medical Education At One School Before Title Ix, Karen Clancy Jan 2016

Women In White: A Retrospective Look At Medical Education At One School Before Title Ix, Karen Clancy

Theses and Dissertations--Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation

The Women in White generation of women physicians who graduated from American medical schools between World War II and the enactment of Title IX were trailblazers. They successfully pursued and achieved physician careers during a time when doctoring was still considered “man’s work.” They helped to clear a path to a modern medical student culture where women and men had more choices.

In a 2008 oral history interview, Dr. Jacqueline Noonan, world-renowned pediatric cardiologist, discoverer of the congenital heart condition known as “Noonan Syndrome,” and the first woman appointed to a chairman role at the University of Kentucky College ...


Jefferson Interprofessional Education Center Teamstepps Workshops For Staff, Alan Forstater Md, Facep, Dimitri Papanagnou Md, Mph, Kevin Lyons Phd, Shoshana Sicks Med, Elizabeth Speakman Edd, Rn, Cde, Anef Nov 2015

Jefferson Interprofessional Education Center Teamstepps Workshops For Staff, Alan Forstater Md, Facep, Dimitri Papanagnou Md, Mph, Kevin Lyons Phd, Shoshana Sicks Med, Elizabeth Speakman Edd, Rn, Cde, Anef

Population Health Matters (Formerly Health Policy Newsletter)

No abstract provided.


The Effect Of Senior Medical Student Tutors Compared To Faculty Tutors On Examination Scores Of First- And Second-Year Medical Students In Two Problem-Based Learning Courses, Damon H. Sakai, Marcel D'Eon, Krista Trinder, Richard T. Kasuya Sep 2015

The Effect Of Senior Medical Student Tutors Compared To Faculty Tutors On Examination Scores Of First- And Second-Year Medical Students In Two Problem-Based Learning Courses, Damon H. Sakai, Marcel D'Eon, Krista Trinder, Richard T. Kasuya

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

At the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, senior medical student volunteers are used as tutors for some problem-based learning groups in both the first and second years. Previous studies on the advantages and disadvantages of student tutors compared to faculty tutors have been equivocal. This study expected to answer the following question: Are there differences in examination scores for learners in their first or second year tutored by fourth-year medical students compared to those tutored by faculty members on two different types of examinations? Students were assessed using more clinically relevant, modified essay question examinations and ...


International Students' Experience Of A Western Medical School: A Mixed Methods Study Exploring The Early Years In The Context Of Cultural And Social Adjustment Compared To Students From The Host Country., Alice Mcgarvey, Ruairi Brugha, Ronán Conroy, Eric Clarke, Elaine Byrne Jul 2015

International Students' Experience Of A Western Medical School: A Mixed Methods Study Exploring The Early Years In The Context Of Cultural And Social Adjustment Compared To Students From The Host Country., Alice Mcgarvey, Ruairi Brugha, Ronán Conroy, Eric Clarke, Elaine Byrne

General Practice Articles

BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed the challenges associated with international students as they adapt to studying medicine in a new host country. Higher level institutions have increasing numbers of international students commencing programmes. This paper explores the experiences of a cohort of students in the early years of medical school in Ireland, where a considerable cohort are from an international background.

METHODS: A mixed exploratory sequential study design was carried out with medical students in the preclinical component of a five year undergraduate programme. Data for the qualitative phase was collected through 29 semi-structured interviews using the peer interview method ...


Online Searching In Pbl Tutorials, Jun Jin, Susan M. Bridges, Michael G. Botelho, Lap Ki Chan Apr 2015

Online Searching In Pbl Tutorials, Jun Jin, Susan M. Bridges, Michael G. Botelho, Lap Ki Chan

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

This study aims to explore how online searching plays a role during PBL tutorials in two undergraduate health sciences curricula, Medicine and Dentistry. Utilizing Interactional Ethnography (IE) as an organizing framework for data collection and analysis, and drawing on a critical theory of technology as an explanatory lens, enabled a textured understanding of student practices and beliefs regarding online searching during face-to-face PBL tutorials. Two event maps trace key transitions in learning regarding online searching in one cycle of problem-based learning in each program. From a critical perspective, analysis of students’ stimulated recall interviews indicated that the use of students ...


Motivational Influences Of Using Peer Evaluation In Problem-Based Learning In Medical Education, Sara Abercrombie, Jay Parkes, Teresita Mccarty Apr 2015

Motivational Influences Of Using Peer Evaluation In Problem-Based Learning In Medical Education, Sara Abercrombie, Jay Parkes, Teresita Mccarty

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

This study investigates the ways in which medical students’ achievement goal orientations (AGO) affect their perceptions of learning and actual learning from an online problem-based learning environment, Calibrated Peer ReviewTM. First, the tenability of a four-factor model (Elliot & McGregor, 2001) of AGO was tested with data collected from medical students (N = 137). Then, a structural regression model relating the factors of AGO to students’ perceptions of grading fairness, judgments of learning, and scoring accuracy was tested. The results indicate that student engagement and success in diagnosing a patient’s presentation using a peer feedback-rich web-based PBL environment is somewhat ...


Simulation-Based Interdisciplinary Team Learning—Pilot Study, Brian C. Patterson, Adam H. Altman, Brittani H. Purkeypile, Bethany Sibbitt, Zachary Ilgiovine, Nicholaus Christian, Phillip J. Wenzell, Natasha Mehta, Raymond Ten Eyck Apr 2015

Simulation-Based Interdisciplinary Team Learning—Pilot Study, Brian C. Patterson, Adam H. Altman, Brittani H. Purkeypile, Bethany Sibbitt, Zachary Ilgiovine, Nicholaus Christian, Phillip J. Wenzell, Natasha Mehta, Raymond Ten Eyck

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

Background: Currently, interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming widely integrated into healthcare professional education with regulating bodies including IPE as a curricular requirement. Although recent studies have concluded that students value IPE, there are a number of challenges associated with initial engagement. Many schools are unsure how to approach this interdisciplinary integration. In addition to IPE, simulation has become an important tool in the education of health professionals. As the first exercise at Wright State University involving interprofessional groups composed completely of undergraduates, interested students from the Boonshoft School of Medicine, the WSU College of Nursing and Health, and the Cedarville ...


A Diverging View Of Role Modeling In Medical Education, Gurjit Sandhu, Jessica V. Rich, Christopher Magas, G. Ross Walker Mar 2015

A Diverging View Of Role Modeling In Medical Education, Gurjit Sandhu, Jessica V. Rich, Christopher Magas, G. Ross Walker

The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Research in the area of role modeling has primarily focused on the qualities and attributes of exceptional role models, and less attention has been given to the act of role modeling itself (Elzubeir & Rizk, 2001; Jochemsen-van der Leeuw, van Dijk, van Etten-Jamaludin, & Wieringa-de Waard, 2013; Wright, 1996; Wright, Wong, & Newill, 1997). A standardized understanding of role modeling in medical education remains elusive (Kenny, Mann, & MacLeod, 2003). This is problematic given that role modeling is pervasively documented as an approach to teaching (Reuler & Nardone, 1994). Our study attempts to fill a void in this body of research by looking at what faculty are thinking, saying, and doing when they say they are role modeling.

Individual semi-structured interviews with faculty members were conducted in the Department of General Surgery at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods for themes surrounding teaching and role modeling. Three major themes emerged from the data: (1) faculty members think they are teaching when they are acting professionally; (2) faculty members become aware of teaching opportunities and act on them; and (3) faculty members employ evidence-based teaching methods, but they are incorrectly labeling them as “role modeling.” As a whole, our findings should help distinguish between role modeling as roles and responsibilities enacted while doing one’s job well, and teaching as facilitated instruction ...


A Longitudinal Study Of Multicultural Curriculum In Medical Education, Mary L. Zanetti, An Dinh, Laura Hunter, Michael A. Godkin, Warren J. Ferguson Feb 2015

A Longitudinal Study Of Multicultural Curriculum In Medical Education, Mary L. Zanetti, An Dinh, Laura Hunter, Michael A. Godkin, Warren J. Ferguson

Mary L. Zanetti

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate impact a multicultural interclerkship had on students' perception of knowledge, interview skills, and empathy towards serving culturally diverse populations and role student demographics played in learning. METHODS: Data extracted from students' self-reported course evaluations and pre/post questionnaires during multiculturalism interclerkship across 11 academic years. Inquired students' opinion about four areas: effectiveness, small group leaders, usefulness, and overall experience. Subscale and item ratings were compared using trend tests including multivariate analyses. RESULTS: During studied years, 883 students completed course evaluation with high overall mean rating of 3.08 (S = 0.45) and subscale mean scores ranging from ...


Assessment Of Medical Students’ Learning Outcomes In Australia : Current Practice, Future Possibilities, David Wilkinson, Benedict Canny, Jacob Pearce, Hamish Coates, Daniel Edwards Feb 2015

Assessment Of Medical Students’ Learning Outcomes In Australia : Current Practice, Future Possibilities, David Wilkinson, Benedict Canny, Jacob Pearce, Hamish Coates, Daniel Edwards

Dr Jacob Pearce

All 19 medical schools in Australia examine and assess the performance of their students, but do so largely in isolation from each other. That is, most schools design, develop and deliver their own exams, against their own curriculum and standards, and students pass, fail and are graded with little external moderation or comparison. Accreditation of schools by the Australian Medical Council (AMC) provides some reassurance that assessment practices are appropriate in medical schools. However, very limited data are available for benchmarking performance against any national standard, or between medical schools in Australia. The Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration has been designed ...


Determining The Quality Of Assessment Items In Collaborations: Aspects To Discuss To Reach Agreement Developed By The Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration, Lambert Schuwirth, Jacob Pearce Feb 2015

Determining The Quality Of Assessment Items In Collaborations: Aspects To Discuss To Reach Agreement Developed By The Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration, Lambert Schuwirth, Jacob Pearce

Dr Jacob Pearce

The Australian Medical Assessment Collaboration (AMAC) project, funded by the Office of Learning and Teaching, seeks to provide an infrastructure and a road map to support collaboration between Australian medical schools in matters of assessment. This may not seem very new perhaps, because there are already several collaborations taking place in Australia, and, typically, they relate to joint item banks, (such as the IDEAL consortium), or joint test administration, (such as the International Foundation of Medicine tests). The AMAC project seeks to build on these existing collaborations in two ways: first, by tying these initiatives together and thus bundling the ...


Factors Influencing The Adoption Of Learning Management Systems By Medical Faculty, Kristy Burrough Jan 2015

Factors Influencing The Adoption Of Learning Management Systems By Medical Faculty, Kristy Burrough

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

Despite recommendations by the Association of American Medical Colleges regarding

the adoption of technology in medical universities, faculty are still reluctant to adopt new

learning technologies. The purpose of this qualitative interview study was to determine

the factors existing in the adoption of learning management technology among late

adopters within the faculty of colleges labeled as comprehensive academic medical

centers. Using the Everett Rogers diffusion of innovations theory as its framework, this

study sought to ascertain the factors late adopters identify as preventing them from

adopting technology and to determine what measures they suggest to increase technology

adoption among their ...


Improving The Quality Of Medical Education, Daniel Edwards Oct 2014

Improving The Quality Of Medical Education, Daniel Edwards

Dr Daniel Edwards

An ongoing collaboration is developing tools and processes to help prove and improve the quality of medical education in Australia through quality comparison, the sharing of expertise and high-quality assessment, as Dan Edwards explains.