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Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec32-44 Why Some Hens Lay More Eggs Than Others, H.E. Alder Jan 1932

Ec32-44 Why Some Hens Lay More Eggs Than Others, H.E. Alder

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 1929 report of the Storrs Egg Laying Contest, which has been conducted at Storrs, Connecticut, twenty-one years, shows that the best pen of ten hens entered laid 2,802 eggs, and the poorest pen laid 829 eggs. In the best pen the average egg production per hen was 280.2 eggs as compared with 82.9 eggs per bird in the poorest pen. Why did the one pen lay so many eggs, and the other so few? This prompts us to try to find out what factors are responsible for the number of eggs a hen lays in the ...


Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1932

Ec32-134 Sweet Clover Management, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover has made a phenomenal growth in popularity and acreage during recent years. In Nebraska, the production increased from 30,000 acres in 1920 to 1,126,000 acres in 1930, an expansion of over one million acres in a 10-year period. Just a few years ago, when sweet clover was classified as a weed, it was the subject of proposed state legislation to prevent its production and spread. Today sweet clover has a recognized place among standard crops and in rotation systems. The acreage of sweet clover in Nebraska is now practically equal to that of alfalfa and ...


Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis Jan 1932

Rb32-266 Cooling Milk On Nebraska Farms, P.A. Downs, E.B. Lewis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The desire of Nebraska people to continue the improvement of living conditions and to secure more healthful foods has been responsible for many changes in methods of caring for milk. One of the important factors in keeping milk sweet and of good quality is the process of cooling and keeping it cool until used. Three of these processes are as follows: placing containers of warm milk in any quantity of still water or still air at temperatures ranging from freezing to within a few degrees of the temperature of the milk, placing the containers in such positions that air or ...


Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1931

Ec31-133 The Management Of Nebraska Soils (Revised March 1936), P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The agricultural lands of this country are its greatest natural resource. History points out that nations with vast areas of good farm land are most likely to prosper and survive over long periods of time. Local communities, too, prosper and flourish in proportion to the productiveness of the surrounding land. Schools, social life, and business develop best in areas where the land is productive and properly managed and conserved.

Nebraska, in common with other states, has suffered by the depletion of soil fertility. The reduction in acres in legumes and grasses, and the deplation of the organic matter in the ...


Rb31-258 The Contribution Fo Nebraska Farm Women To Family Income Through Poultry And Dairy Products, M. Ruth Clark Jan 1931

Rb31-258 The Contribution Fo Nebraska Farm Women To Family Income Through Poultry And Dairy Products, M. Ruth Clark

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This investigation was made in 1929-1930 for the purpose of studying the activities of Nebraska farm women in the raising of poultry and in the care of dairy products, to discover whether or not such activities resulted in a contribution to the family income. With this in view, a group of women were asked to keep records for one year (from April 1, 1929 to March 31, 1930) of the value and amount of dairy and poultry products sold or used, of all expense incurred in production, and of the time spent both by the homemaker herself and by all ...


Ec31-625 How To Produce Better Milk And Cream, E.L. Reichart Jan 1931

Ec31-625 How To Produce Better Milk And Cream, E.L. Reichart

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Would you refuse a $20.00 bill when offered you as a present without any strings attached?

Would you not like to have it said that your creamery produces the best butter in Nebraska?

Would you not be glad to have people refer to your county as the best dairy county in Nebraska?

Of course you would because it would bring more cattle buyers into your community and you would get better prices for your bull and heifer calves.

You can accomplsih all these things by producing higher grade milk and cream. Perhaps the suggestions on the next few pages ...


Rb31-253 Variety Tests Of Oats, Barley, And Spring Wheat, T.A. Kiesselbach, W.E. Lyness Jan 1931

Rb31-253 Variety Tests Of Oats, Barley, And Spring Wheat, T.A. Kiesselbach, W.E. Lyness

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The use of superior varieties is of first importance in the production of spring small grains. The comparative merits of the different crops and their available varieties may be best determined through tests extending over a period of years. Tests of oats, barley, and spring wheat have been made on the Experiment Station Farm of the Nebraska College of Agriculture at Lincoln.

The plan has been to have these variety trials include the most promising sorts obtainable from Nebraska and other states. Most of the varieties grown have originated in the breeding experiments of various state and federal experiment stations ...


Ua30/1/1 State Normal Farm Near Bowling Green, Kentucky, H. M. Yarbrough, Wku Planning, Design & Construction Jan 1930

Ua30/1/1 State Normal Farm Near Bowling Green, Kentucky, H. M. Yarbrough, Wku Planning, Design & Construction

WKU Archives Records

Map by surveyor H.M. Yarbrough showing location of 81 acres of WKU Farm. Scale is 1 inch = 15 poles, northwest orientation, 22" x 10". Includes location of Jonesville. The map is undated, 1930 is a circa date.


Ec30-39 Swine Sanitation, L. Van Es Jan 1930

Ec30-39 Swine Sanitation, L. Van Es

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

From the very beginning of Nebraska's agricultural development its farmers have recognized that the production of swine must of necessity accompany the growing of corn. The latter, one of the state's most important staples, cannot be marketed in a more economical manner than after having been transformed into pork, bacon, and lard.

As a result the state has for many years maintained a rather dense swine population mainly divided into large herds kept on relatively small areas of land. This density of population, as well as certain practices in management and selective breeding, has brought about conditions favorable ...


Rb30-250 Raising Early Lambs From Aged Western Ewes, A.D. Weber Jan 1930

Rb30-250 Raising Early Lambs From Aged Western Ewes, A.D. Weber

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Many farm flocks in Nebraska are comprised of aged western ewes. They are easily obtained because of the state's geographical position with reference to the sheep-producing sections of the West and the leading feeder lamb markets. Nebraska ranks second in number of western lambs fed. This also tends to acquaint farmers with range sheep.

This 1930 research bulletin discusses factors in early lamb production; objects of the experiment, experimental procedure, and experimental data of raising early lambs from aged western ewes.


Rb30-252 Sex And Age As Factors In Cattle Feeding, H.J. Gramlich, R.R. Thalman Jan 1930

Rb30-252 Sex And Age As Factors In Cattle Feeding, H.J. Gramlich, R.R. Thalman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Varying economic conditions and changes in the demands of the meat consuming public have been responsible for the turns that have taken place in the beef industry during recent years. Both feeder and producer must recognize and conform to these changes if they are to continue in business. Among the most important of these changes have been the turn toward the marketing of lighter cattle and the gradual disappearance from feed lots of two- and three-year-old animals. Furthermore, the cattle population of the United States is fast reaching stabilization with the resulting effect that more heifers are being marketed, since ...


Rb30-245 Water Supply And Sewage Disposal Systems For Farm Homes, Ivan D. Wood, E.B. Lewis Jan 1930

Rb30-245 Water Supply And Sewage Disposal Systems For Farm Homes, Ivan D. Wood, E.B. Lewis

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

When the well "goes dry" or when the windmill or pump breaks down, every one in the household immediately appreciates the value fo plenty of water. In other words, "You never miss the water until the well runs dry." Fortunately, in most sections of this state, plenty of pure water may be obtained by sinking wells of moderate depth, yet surprisingly few farm homes are supplied with running water in the kitchen even though the barn yards are equipped with hydrants and tanks.

It is the purpose of this bulletin to present a number of water supply and sewage disposal ...


Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott Jan 1930

Rb30-244 Types Of Farming In Nebraska, Harold Hedges, F.E. Elliott

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

"Type of farming" as used in this bulletin is a term descriptive of a group of farms similar in size and enterprise combination. Thus a group of farms having the same kind, quantity, and proportion of crops oand livestock may be said to be following the same type of farming. The term "type-of-farming area" refers to an area within which there is a high degree of uniformity in the type of farming practicse and in the physical and economic conditions under which production takes place. This should not be understood to mean that there is absolute uniformity either in farming ...


Rb30-246 Testing Ice Cream For Butterfat, L.K. Crowe Jan 1930

Rb30-246 Testing Ice Cream For Butterfat, L.K. Crowe

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Butterfat is usually the most expensive ingredient of ice cream; hence, great care is necessary in controllng its use. The manufacturer of ice cream, whether doing a large or a small volume of business, must manufacture a product that will comply with the established fat standard. Some means of determining the percentage of butterfat in the product must be available in order to establish this control.

This 1930 research bulletin discusses the different testing equipment used to test butterfat in ice cream.


Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. V, No. 7, Wku Student Affairs Apr 1929

Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. V, No. 7, Wku Student Affairs

WKU Archives Records

WKU campus newspaper reporting campus, athletic and Bowling Green, Kentucky news. Regular features include:

  • Alumni News
  • Athletics
  • Chapel
  • Class News
  • Club News
  • Editorials
  • Kempusology Inside Out by Kelly Thompson
  • Kollege Kampus Ravings by A. Shavings
  • Personals
  • Rambling ‘Round by Leon Cook
  • Training School Notes

This issue contains articles:

  • Kentucky Citizens, Students & Alumni of Western Teachers College Respond Splendidly to Kentucky Building Plans
  • Summer School
  • Western Car of Debaters in Collision
  • Rocky Mountain Field Trip Progressing
  • The Kentucky Education Association Convenes April 17-20 in Columbia Hall First Session Wednesday Evening 7:30
  • Know Kentucky Kanters are off to Learn State
  • Training ...


Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. V, No. 6, Wku Student Affairs Mar 1929

Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. V, No. 6, Wku Student Affairs

WKU Archives Records

WKU campus newspaper reporting campus, athletic and Bowling Green, Kentucky news. Regular features include:

  • Alumni News
  • Athletics
  • Chapel
  • Class News
  • Club News
  • Editorials
  • Kempusology Inside Out by Kelly Thompson
  • Kollege Kampus Ravings by A. Shavings
  • Personals
  • Rambling ‘Round by Leon Cook
  • Training School Notes

This issue contains articles:

  • Kentucky Building Plans Hailed by Students
  • Local Rifle Team Winner in this Area
  • Committee – Kentucky Building
  • The Creation Scores Great Success Here
  • Bishop Hughes to Give Sermon at Teachers College
  • Prof. A.C. Burton Addresses NEA at Cleveland, O.
  • Climate Class Visits U.S. Bureau
  • Many Students Hear Mr. Hoover’s Inaugural ...


Truancy In The Public Schools : Its Cause And Cure., Kathleen Miller Jan 1929

Truancy In The Public Schools : Its Cause And Cure., Kathleen Miller

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

In this age in which we live it is not hard to find a problem but it is often difficult to choose one. These problems have arisen as a result of the complex social and industrial institutions which have evolved as a result of human inventiveness and the competition among men to better our living conditions and increase our comforts. According to statistics compiled by the General Federation of Women's Clubs, the proportion of those who enjoy these modern conveniences is small when compared to those who have suffered as a result. The problem of this study is one ...


Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener Jan 1928

Ec28-234 Nebraska System For Tattooing Hogs For Identification After Slaughter, G.R. Boomer, O.O. Waggener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

A plan to identify the individual farm upon which hogs reaching markets are produced has been developed in connection with the efforts toward eradicating tuberculosis among farm animals. While primarily intended as a means of tracing back to determine sources of disease infection, the system of tattooing which is being developed has other significant possibilities. With the growing emphasis on quality products in the market, it is only fair that the producers of high quality commodities receive the premiums paid by processors and consumers. Health of farm animals is a quality factor. The producer of healthy hogs should be rewarded ...


Ec28-36 Spraying Tree Fruits (Revised March 1932), C.C. Wiggans, E.H. Hoppert Jan 1928

Ec28-36 Spraying Tree Fruits (Revised March 1932), C.C. Wiggans, E.H. Hoppert

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The production of sound, clean fruit is unquestionably one of the major problems facing the modern fruit grower. Culture may be neglected and pruning delayed for a time but the omission of sprays for even a single season demonstrates their absolute necessity. This applies equally to the commercial grower and to the farmer or gardener who has only a few trees.

Spray materials, equipment, management, schedules, insect pests and orchard diseases are discussed in this 1928 extension circular.


Rb28-229 Fattening Steers Of Various Ages, H.J. Gramlich Jan 1928

Rb28-229 Fattening Steers Of Various Ages, H.J. Gramlich

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

During recent years the beef industry has undergone vast changes. These have been made necessary in part by economic conditions and in part by changes in the demands of the American people. The tendency has been toward earlier marketing of steers, so that instead of going to the block as mature individuals at from 3 to 5 years of age, they are now reaching the market at a much younger age. In consuming centers where only heavy carcasses of beef were demanded formerly there is a call today for carcasses of the yearling and long yearling class.

The experiments reported ...


Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George Jan 1927

Ec27-811 Harvesting Wheat In Nebraska With The Combined Harvester Thresher 1926, Arthur G. George

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Frequent inquiry from wheat growers in Nebraska and others as to the relative merits of the combined harvester-thresher as an efficienct and economical harvesting machine led the Nebraska Agricultural College to make a study of this problem in the summer of 1926. The work was carried on by the Departments of Rural Economics and Agricultural Engineering, cooperating with the United States Department of Agriculture which was conducting a similar survey in different parts of the United States. Perkins county, Nebraska, was the area selected for study as it is more or less typical of those parts of the state where ...


Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1926

Ec26-129 Profitable Wheawt Production, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

More profitable wheat production, rather than greater total production in Nebraska, is the object of this circular. The grower who has the largest acreage of wheat does not necessarily make the greatest profit. High yields per acre usually means a lower cost and a great profit per bushel. Wheat of high quality brings additional profits. High yield and quality are usually the combined result of good seed, disease prevention, crop rotations, a well-prepared seed bed, the proper time of seeding, and reasonable care in harvesting, threshing and storing.


Ec25-228 Farm Slaughter Of Hogs, Wm. J. Loeffel Jan 1925

Ec25-228 Farm Slaughter Of Hogs, Wm. J. Loeffel

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Slaughtering hogs and curing the meat on the farm is a common practice which makes available a palatable and nutritious food. It utilizes labor at a season of the year when usually there is no great rush of work.

As a general rule, farm slaughter is not to be recommended until cold weather is a certainty, for warm weather is apt to cause heavy spoilage. Meat is a highly perishable food product, therefore absolute cleanliness should prevail in its handling. Contamination of meat by soiled hands, clothing, tools, or containers is not only insanitary but actually lowers the keeping quality ...


Rb25-207 The Spindle-Tuber Disease: One Cause Of "Run-Out" Seed Potatoes, H.O. Werner Jan 1925

Rb25-207 The Spindle-Tuber Disease: One Cause Of "Run-Out" Seed Potatoes, H.O. Werner

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The spindle-tuber disease is one of the most prevalent potato diseases occurring in all parts of Nebraska. It has been found in all varieties tested. It does much damage to the potato crop, in that it reduces the yield and injures the market quality of the potatoes.

This 1925 publication discusses the spindler-tuber disease also known as "running-out" or degeneracy of seed potatoes; the distribution of the disease; effect upon yield and quality; symptoms of the different potato varieties; transmission of the disease and experiments; rate of increase of the disease; dry land versus irrigation in western Nebraska; straw mulching ...


Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood Jan 1924

Ec24-721 Dairy Barns For Nebraska, Oscar W. Sjogren, Ivan D. Wood

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The increasing interest shown among the farmers thruout this state in the betterment of dairy stock, and the tendency to give more attention to dairying on the farms, is bringing to the Agricultural College a great many requests for plans and suggestions for dairy barn construction. It is impossible to give every one of these inquiries individual attention to the extent of drawing a detailed plan to suit the conditions in each case. It is hoped therefore, that the material contained in this bulletin will offer helpful suggestions and answer many questions in the minds of prospective dairy men and ...


Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart Jan 1923

Ec23-120 Wheat In Nebraska, W.W. Burr, P.H. Stewart

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Wheat is one of the most important crops of the world. In total world tonnage it ranks third, being surpassed only by corn and potatoes. In th United States the tonnage is second only to corn, but wheat is far more important than corn as a human food.

Wheat is more important as a human food than any other rain crop. It is in itself almost a balanced food, and from earliest times has played an important part in the development of civilization. With the development of modern machinery wheat can now be produced without almost no hand work. On ...


Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross Jan 1923

Ec23-122 Sweet Clover In Nebraska, P.H. Stewart, D.L. Gross

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Sweet clover is adapted to practically all parts of Nebraska. It will grow under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions and is found growing wild in almost all sections of the state. It grows luxuriantly in eastern Nebraska and also does well in the western part of the state. Sweet clover will grow in regions of less rainfall than will red clover and, under certain conditions, it will do well where alfalfa is not easily grown.

This 1923 circular is largely based on questionnaire replies received from more than 200 farmers growing sweet clover in all parts of ...


Ua12/2/1 Normal Heights, Vol. 3, No. 1, Western Kentucky University Feb 1919

Ua12/2/1 Normal Heights, Vol. 3, No. 1, Western Kentucky University

WKU Archives Records

Newsletter and course catalog promoting Western Kentucky University. This issue focuses on rural education.


Ua12/2/1 Normal Heights, Vol. 1, No. 2, Western Kentucky University Feb 1917

Ua12/2/1 Normal Heights, Vol. 1, No. 2, Western Kentucky University

WKU Archives Records

Newsletter and course catalog published bi-monthly. This issue promotes on the Rural Life & Rural School Conference held in February 1917.


A Brief Sketch Of The Life And Work Of Charles Edwin Bessey, Raymond J. Pool Dec 1915

A Brief Sketch Of The Life And Work Of Charles Edwin Bessey, Raymond J. Pool

Papers in Systematics & Biological Diversity

Charles Edwin Bessey, professor of botany and head of the department of botany in the University of Nebraska since 1884 and a conspicuous figure in American science and education, passed away at his home in Lincoln on February 25, 1915, after a critical illness of four weeks.

The Bessey family is of French extraction, the original form of the name being Besse. The tradition is that the early members of the family, who were Huguenots, were compelled on account of religious persecution to flee to England from the old home near Strassburg in Alsace. This exodus occurred in the latter ...