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Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson Mar 2012

Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson

Douglas Anderson

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts held by Nebraska producers will begin to expire in 1996. Thousands of acres of grassland will be eligible for haying, grazing or to be returned to other uses. Land-use decisions made by owners and operators will impact the economic viability and long-term productivity of individual farms, as well as the region as a whole. The intent of the CRP Land Use Guide is not to provide all the asnwers - in many instances we don't even know the questions. It is however, intended to provide an outline of the key issues you will face when ...


Narrow Sense Heritability And Additive Genetic Correlations In Alfalfa Subsp. Falcata, Heathcliffe Riday, E. Charles Brummer Jan 2007

Narrow Sense Heritability And Additive Genetic Correlations In Alfalfa Subsp. Falcata, Heathcliffe Riday, E. Charles Brummer

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The complex genetics of autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) make additive genetic variance component estimation difficult. Halfsib family variances often are used to estimate additive genetic variances and, by extension, narrow sense heritabilities and additive genetic correlations. These estimates contain a portion of the dominance variance. Using such calculations, in conjunction with parent-offspring covariance estimates, the dominance component can be separated from the additive genetic component. This is rarely done. This study reports average estimates across 30 populations, of both additive and dominance variance component estimates based on between halfsib family variance and parent-offspring covariance for biomass yield, plant height ...


Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-103 2007 Fall Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, Jerry D. Volesky, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2006 wheat crop has faced more than the usual number of challenges. Western Nebraska was again faced with shortages of rainfall as well as wheat streak mosaic. Eastern Nebraska fared better, but some places had soil borne mosaic problems. Overall, the state yield was down but becasue of similar problems throughout the Great Plains, the price of wheat has remained strong. This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Lab. Conduct of experiments ...


Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2007

Ec07-101 2007 Spring Seed Guide, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Richard B. Ferguson, David Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service. The following pages include the results of our variety testing programs for many crop species throughtout the state. We hope you find this information useful as you make hybrid and variety decisions for ...


Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson Jan 2006

Ec06-155 Nutrient Management For Agronomic Crops In Nebraska, Richard B. Ferguson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Nebraska is blessed with fertile soil and vast supplies of groundwater which combine to create an environment well-suited to the production of corn, wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa, edible beans, and other agronomic crops used for human or animal consumption.

This manual is a guide to nutrient use from all sources for the production of Nebraska's major agronomic crops: corn, winter wheat, grain sorghum, oats, alfalfa, dry edible beans, soybean, sugar beets, popcorn, sunflower, millet, potatoes, and cool and warm season grasses for hay and pasture. Part I of the manual contains information focusing on basic principles of soil fertility ...


Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman Jan 2006

Ec06-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2007, Lenis Alton Nelson, Robert N. Klein, Bruce Anderson, P. Stephen Baenziger, Jerry Nachtman

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories and the South Central Ag Laboratory. Conduct of experiments and publications of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze Jan 2005

Ec05-130 Guide For Weed Management In Nebraska, Roch E. Gaussoin, Brady F. Kappler, Robert N. Klein, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Drew J. Lyon, Alex Martin, Fred Roeth, Gail A. Wicks, Robert G. Wilson, Robert A. Masters, Patrick J. Shea, Larry D. Schulze

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

One of the major thrusts of all University of Nebraska weed science faculty is the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska. This guide is not just the work of one or two people, rather it is a joint effort of all the authors to produce a comprehensive, information-packed resource. Each weed science faculty member is responsible for particular sections of the guide. The process of reviewing the current content, checking labels and research data and updating the content can be an extensive process. Each year new herbicide active ingredients and trade names are introduced and figuring out what a herbicide ...


Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall Jan 2005

Ec05-101 Spring Seed Guide, 2006, Lenis Alton Nelson, Bruce Anderson, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, David D. Baltensperger, Charles A. Shapiro, Stevan Z. Knezevic, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety and hybrid performance tests conducted by the Agronomy/Horticulture Department, the Northeast, West Central, and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers, the South Central Agricultural Laboratory as part of the University of Nebraska and University of Wyoming at Torrington. Conduct of experiments and publication of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Irrigated Alfalfa Vaariety Performance, 1999-2002; Kaysville, Utah, Michael Bouck, Ralph Whitesides, Thomas Griggs, R. F. Sessions, J. S. Murdock, D. A. Chandler Oct 2004

Irrigated Alfalfa Vaariety Performance, 1999-2002; Kaysville, Utah, Michael Bouck, Ralph Whitesides, Thomas Griggs, R. F. Sessions, J. S. Murdock, D. A. Chandler

All Current Publications

This report summarizes alfalfa yields from four harvest years of an irrigated trial at the Utah Agricultural Experiment station research farm at Kaysville, Cavis Co.


Alfalfa Variety Selection Guidelines, Thomas Griggs Sep 2004

Alfalfa Variety Selection Guidelines, Thomas Griggs

All Current Publications

This fact sheet provides guidelines for selecting the right alfalfa variety and includes preliminary site and end-use consideration, variety selection based on plant traits, and seed quality and treatment considerations.


Ec04-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall Jan 2004

Ec04-103 Fall Seed Guide, 2004, Lenis Alton Nelson, David D. Baltensperger, Robert N. Klein, Roger Wesley Elmore, P. Stephen Baenziger, James Krall

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This circular is a progress report of variety trials conducted by personnel of the Agronomy Department and the South Central, West Central and Panhandle Research and Extension Centers and their associated agricultural laboratories. Conduct of experiments and publications of results is a joint effort of the Agricultural Research Division and the Cooperative Extension Service.


Biomass Yield Stability In Alfalfa, Joseph G. Robins, Heathcliffe Riday, Sara J. Helland, E. Charles Brummer Jan 2004

Biomass Yield Stability In Alfalfa, Joseph G. Robins, Heathcliffe Riday, Sara J. Helland, E. Charles Brummer

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

In addition to biomass production, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars also need to express yield stability across diverse environments. The objective of this experiment was to analyze the nature of biomass yield stability in ten commercial alfalfa cultivars by evaluating performance of individual genotypes. Biomass yield was measured in each of five environments across two years, and the yield stability computed for the overall cultivar mean performance and the mean performance of each of the genotypes comprising the cultivars using the genotype x environment variance statistic of Shukla and the superiority statistic of Lin and Binns'. The GxE variance of the ...


Ec03-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, David D. Baltensperger Jan 2003

Ec03-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, David D. Baltensperger

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The most important variety decision on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to ten or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed annually. Yield potential, pest resistance, and seed price should be considered when selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska.


Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro Jan 2003

Ec03-181 Alfalfa In Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Loren J. Giesler, Thomas E. Hunt, Shripat T. Kamble, Stevan Z. Knezevic, Charles A. Shapiro

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop grown in Nebraska, with over 1,000 acres grown in every county. It has the highest feeding value for livestock and one of the highest yield potentials. Alfalfa can produce more protein per acre than any other crop and can provide all of the protein needed by many livestock as well as supplying large amounts of vitamins, minerals, and energy. Protein of alfalfa. In also covers the cultural practices, insect pests, diseases, weeds that affect alfalfa.


Ec03-1887 Alfalfa Disease Profiles, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, James P. Stack, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2003

Ec03-1887 Alfalfa Disease Profiles, Loren J. Giesler, John E. Watkins, James P. Stack, Robert M. Harveson, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This two-page, 4-color publications profiles the diseases and symptoms of alfalfa. The diseases discussed here include: rust, anthracnose, stemphylium leaf spot, downy mildew, common leaf spot, spring black stem, summer black stem, stem nematode, seedling blights, phytophthora root rot, alfalfa mosaic, crown rot, verticillium wilt, and violet root rot.


Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett Jan 2003

Ec03-883 Crop And Livestock Prices For Nebraska Producers, 1960-2003, Darrell R. Mark, Dillon Feuz, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This report contains historical price data for the major crops and livestock commodities produced in Nebraska. Prices received by producers are reported for 1960-2002 for most of the commodities.

The data was compiled from Nebraska Agricultural Statistics Services and Agricultural Prices, National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA; Oil Crops Situation and Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; Cotton and Wool Outlook, Economic Research Service, USDA; and Livestock and Grain Market News, Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. Sources of prices for each commodity are indicated on the tables.


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.


Ec01-1880 Diseases Of Nebraska's Field Crops, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, Jim Stack, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky Jan 2001

Ec01-1880 Diseases Of Nebraska's Field Crops, Loren J. Giesler, Robert M. Harveson, Jim Stack, John E. Watkins, Jennifer L. Chaky

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Each year, plant diseases are an important factor in reducing yields of Nebraska's field crops. The purpose of this publication is to provide concise information in an easy to use table for many of Nebraska's field crop diseases. The disease information is organized by crop.

Diseases covered in this publication include the four main groups of plant pathogens: fungi, bacteria, viruses, and nematodes.


Ec01-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska 2001, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece Jan 2001

Ec01-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska 2001, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Yield potential, pest resistance and seed price should be considered when selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska.

The most important variety decision for many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to 10 or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed every year.

Varieties that have been tested with commercial seed since 1991 for two or more years at locations in Nebraska and marketed in the state are shown in this 2001 extension circular revision.


Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin Jan 2001

Ec01-872 Nebraska Crop Budgets 2001, Roger Selley, Tina N. Barrett, Richard T. Clark, Robert N. Klein, Steve Melvin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The 2001 Crop Budgets contains a list of representative field operations and materials that provides a reminder of items typically invovled in producing the crop. The budgets are presented in a worksheet format with a "Your Estimate" column for recording modifications in costs.

This publication covers the following crops: Forages -- alfalfa, annual hay, corn silage, grass, grass hay, and pasture. Grain -- corn, dry beans, grain sorghum, proso millet, oats, soybeans, sugar beets, sunflower, wheat.


Gophers Eating Into Ag Profits, Dennis Hinkamp Jan 2001

Gophers Eating Into Ag Profits, Dennis Hinkamp

All Current Publications

No abstract provided.


Ec00-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece Jan 2000

Ec00-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Yield potential, pest resistance and seed price should be considered when selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska.

The most important variety decision on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to 10 or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be change every year.

This extension circular lists the alfalfa varieties that have been tested in Nebraska with commercial seed for two or more years since 1997 and marketed in the state. These are the 2000 results.


G00-1393 Grazing Alfalfa (Revised September 2004), Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce E. Anderson Jan 2000

G00-1393 Grazing Alfalfa (Revised September 2004), Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce E. Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most productive and versatile forage legume grown in Nebraska. Cutting for hay or silage has been the traditional method of harvest, but many options also exist for grazing. With current technology and proper management beef gain can exceed 1,000 pounds per acre with acceptable stand persistence.

Grazing alfalfa may be a cost efficient means of harvest for some producers. This NebGuide explores alfalfa and alfalfa/grass options, varieties and stand establishment, and grazing and bloat management.


G99-1393 Grazing Alfalfa, Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce Anderson Jan 1999

G99-1393 Grazing Alfalfa, Jerry D. Volesky, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grazing alfalfa may be a cost efficient means of harvest for some producers. This NebGuide explores alfalfa and alfalfa/grass options, varieties and stand establishment, and grazing and bloat management.

Alfalfa is the most productive and versatile forage legume grown in Nebraska. Cutting for hay or silage has been the traditional method of harvest, but many opportunities and options exist for grazing. With current technology and proper management, beef gain can exceed 1,000 pounds per acre with acceptable stand persistence.


Ec98-1875 Alfalfa Disease Management, John E. Watkins Jan 1998

Ec98-1875 Alfalfa Disease Management, John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Alfalfa is the most important forage crop in Nebraska. it is wisely adapted, energy efficient and produces the most protein yield per acre. It is used widely for local livestock feed and its importance as a cash crop is growing rapidly. With good management, Nebraska producers can attain good alfalfa yields and high quality in either irrigated or dryland production systems.

In Nebraska the diseases that most affect forage yields, forage quality and stand persistence are crown and root rots, phytophthora root rot, anthracnose, spring black stem, summer black stem and common leaf spot. Each will be discussed briefly in ...


Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell Jan 1997

Nf97-328 A Guide To Grasshopper Control In Cropland (Revised May 2004), Gary L. Hein, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Grasshoppers have been a major concern to farmers and ranchers since Nebraska was first settled. The potential for devastation, while still serious, is not as great as it was 100 years ago because many of the prime grasshopper breeding areas along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains are now under tillage. Statewide, grasshopper populations fluctuate in cycles with large numbers occurring for two to four years, followed by moderate numbers for several years.

This NebFact discusses grasshopper damage to cropland, how to determine when control is required and methods of control.


G97-1342 Feeding Value Of Alfalfa Hay And Alfalfa Silage, Terry L. Mader, Todd Milton, Ivan G. Rush, Bruce Anderson Jan 1997

G97-1342 Feeding Value Of Alfalfa Hay And Alfalfa Silage, Terry L. Mader, Todd Milton, Ivan G. Rush, Bruce Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide discusses the feeding value of alfalfa under different harvesting, storage and feeding methods, as compared to other protein sources.

In Nebraska, alfalfa is used primarily as a protein source. However, for cow-calf producers it can sometimes be an economical energy source, depending on the prevailing price of feed grains and other sources of energy.

Alfalfa is generally harvested as dry hay or as silage (65 percent moisture). Ensiling at 45 to 55 percent moisture is also common, particularly if the alfalfa is stored in an upright oxygen-limiting structure. Regardless of harvesting and storage methods, some dry matter and ...


Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson Jan 1996

Ec96-142 Crp Land Use Guide (Conservation Reserve Program), Douglas Anderson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts held by Nebraska producers will begin to expire in 1996. Thousands of acres of grassland will be eligible for haying, grazing or to be returned to other uses. Land-use decisions made by owners and operators will impact the economic viability and long-term productivity of individual farms, as well as the region as a whole.

The intent of the CRP Land Use Guide is not to provide all the asnwers - in many instances we don't even know the questions. It is however, intended to provide an outline of the key issues you will face when ...


G95-1263 When To Sample For Alfalfa Weevil, Steven J. Meyer, Robert K.D. Peterson Jan 1995

G95-1263 When To Sample For Alfalfa Weevil, Steven J. Meyer, Robert K.D. Peterson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Dates for initiating alfalfa weevil scouting are provided, based on 30 years of climatic data used to estimate appropriate degree day accumulations for northern and southern Nebraska. Sampling activities for alfalfa weevil need to be timed properly because it is inefficient to sample when the pest is not active or present. Conversely, delayed sampling is financially risky because economic damage can occur before a management practice is implemented. Integrated pest management programs often use degree day accumulations to initiate activities, while producers often use calendar dates. Calendar scheduling is traditionally based on subjective experience rather than research.


G95-1254 Weed Control In Alfalfa, Robert Wilson, Gail Wicks, Alex Martin Jan 1995

G95-1254 Weed Control In Alfalfa, Robert Wilson, Gail Wicks, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebGuide describes how weeds can be controlled in alfalfa. Weeds can interfere with alfalfa from the time of seeding through the life of the crop. Increased weed density in new seedings of alfalfa can decrease alfalfa stand. Weeds can also substantially reduce yield and quality of established alfalfa. In severe situations alfalfa yield can be reduced over 50 percent from weed competition (Figure 1). As weed content increases, the percentage of alfalfa in forage declines. Normally the quality of forage declines as the percentage of weeds increases.