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Life Sciences

2002

Field crops

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Education

Ec02-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska 2002, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, Patrick E. Reece Jan 2002

Ec02-153 Selecting Alfalfa Varieties For Nebraska 2002, Bruce Anderson, Michael Trammell, Charles A. Shapiro, Patrick E. Reece

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Yield potential, pest resistance and seed price should be considered when selecting alfalfa varieties in Nebraska. The most important variety decision on many farms and ranches is the selection of alfalfa. The choice of alfalfa variety affects production for three to 10 or more years, whereas varieties of annual crops can be changed every year. Many alfalfa varieties are available from private and public plant breeders. Over the years, yield trials conducted at widely distributed Nebraska locations have tested most varieties sold in the state.


Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener Jan 2002

Nf02-518 Management Of Phytophthora Diseases Of Soybeans, Loren J. Giesler, Jane A. Christensen, Christopher M. Zwiener

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Phythophthora diseases of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, are present wherever soybeans are grown in Nebraska. The pathogen survives primarily as "resting" spores in the soil or in association with infested crop debris. Symptoms associated with Phytophthora sojae, infections include seed rots, pre- and post-emergence dampin goff of seedlings and stem rot of plants at various growth stages.

Knowledge of the races present in the state and how varieties with different resistance genes have performed in a grower's field is critical to variety selection for maximum profitability.


Nf02-504 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In No-Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Nf02-504 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In No-Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Atrazine herbicide has been in an EPA special review since 1994 because of soil surface runoff concerns. Beginning in 1997, we evaluated atrazine and non-atrazine herbicide treatments in conventional tillage corn and no-till corn on university research farms at Clay Center (irrigated) and Lincoln, Nebraska (non-irrigated). The objective was to compare some common atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides in soil-applied and post emergence treatment combinations. Fourteen herbicide treatments were selected to represent commonly used herbicide classes and application timings. This NebFact reports the no-till results.


Nf02-503 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin Jan 2002

Nf02-503 Atrazine And Non-Atrazine Herbicide Comparisons In Conventional Till Corn, Fred Roeth, Alex Martin

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Atrazine herbicide has been in an EPA special review since 1994 because of surface and groundwater contamination concerns. Beginning in 1997, we evaluated atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides in conventional tillage corn and no-till corn on university research farms at Clay Center and Lincoln, Nebraska. The objective was to compare some common atrazine and non-atrazine herbicides for weed control and crop response. Thirteen herbicides were selected to represent commonly used herbicide classes and treatment timings. This NebFact reports the conventional till results.


Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack Jan 2002

Nf02-506 Plant Disease Central Web Site, Jim Stack

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Disease is a natural part of every crop production system. This is true for all crop species and for each type of production system; irrigated or rain-fed, conventional or conservation tillage, and continuous or rotational cropping. In any given year, the question is which diseases will occur in Nebraska's field crops and at what incidence and severity.

To help producers, consultants, and other agricultural professionals diagnose and manage field crop diseases in Nebraska, the Plant Disease Central (PDC) web site was developed. The home page includes instructions on navigating the site under the "About This Site" link.

This NebFact ...


Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson Jan 2002

Nf02-543 Ascochyta Blight Of Chickpeas, Robert M. Harveson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) ranks among the world's three most important pulse (legume) crops. It is an important source of protein in many parts of central Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean and among the food legumes, is the most effective in reducing blood ocholesterol levels. The crop is antive to western Asia and the Middle East, and is usually grown as a rainfed cool-weather crop or as a dry climate crop in semi-arid regions.

Although chickpeas are reported to be susceptible to over 50 pathogens, few diseases are currently recognized as significant economic constraints to production. Ascochyta blight caused ...


Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins Jan 2002

Nf02-561 Management Program For Common Root Rot And Fusarium Foot Rot (Crown Rot) (Revised September 2005), John E. Watkins

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This NebFact, the Wheat Disease Fact Sheet No. 3 of a series, discusses the cause and occurrence, key symptoms, cultural management practices, fungicide programs, and applications for controlling common root rot and fusarium foot rot (crown rot) of wheat.


Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley Jan 2002

Nf02-551 Management Of Blister Beetles In Alfalfa, John B. Campbell, Steve Ensley

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Adult blister beetles (Epicauta spp.) tend to be gregarious, and several may be observed feeding on the same flowering plant such as alfalfa or sometimes soybeans, goldenrod or occasionally musk thistle, They feed primarily on leaves and flowers but do little damage to crops.

This NebFact discusses the life cycle, damage, treatment, and prevention avoidance of the blister beetle here in Nebraska.