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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Education

Geology Of Iowa Fens, C. A. Thompson, E. A. Bettis Iii, R. G. Baker Jan 1992

Geology Of Iowa Fens, C. A. Thompson, E. A. Bettis Iii, R. G. Baker

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Fens are peatlands which are dependent on groundwater discharge to provide nutrient enrichment. Fens are found in a variety of landscape positions and in most Iowa landform regions. This paper presents a classification system for Iowa fens based on landscape position, stratigraphy, and hydrologic factors. Iowa fens can be separated into six categories: 1) fens along valley wall slopes; the groundwater source for these fens is sand and gravel buried between glacial tills (inter-till); 2) fens in hummocky topography on the northwestern margin of the Des Moines Lobe landform region; the water source is sand and gravel buried within glacial ...


Necklace Radio Transmitter Attachment For Pheasants, Terry Z. Riley, Bruce A. Fistler Jan 1992

Necklace Radio Transmitter Attachment For Pheasants, Terry Z. Riley, Bruce A. Fistler

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

We tested a pre-assembled, necklace-radio-transmitter-attachment design on female ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) in northern Iowa. Birds were captured by nightlighting and bait trapping between September 1989 and March 1990. Radio transmitters were attached to 128 using a wire necklace. Two birds had problems adapting to the necklace, and 3 birds removed them. Twenty-three birds were still alive and wearing necklaces at the end of the study, for an average of 318 (SD= ± 52) days. Ease of attachment, long durability, light weight, and minimal bulk make the necklace an effective alternative to harness and poncho mounts.


History Of Mammal Study In Iowa, John B. Bowles Jan 1992

History Of Mammal Study In Iowa, John B. Bowles

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

The first records of mammals in Iowa were from explorers, survey parties heading westward and early seeders. Generation of checklists of state mammals began in 1840 and culminated with the annotated list by Scott (1937) and biogeographic analysis by Bowles (1975). Recent focus has been on rare species status and mammalian ecology, e.g., Loess Hills, riparian habitat, agricultural practices, and reestablished grasslands.


Natural History In Iowa: The Early Phases, David C. Glenn-Lewin, Thomas R. Rosburg Jan 1992

Natural History In Iowa: The Early Phases, David C. Glenn-Lewin, Thomas R. Rosburg

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Natural history in Iowa prior to the 20th Century can be conveniently arranged into 4 phases: Native American, before the Louisiana Purchase, between the Louisiana Purchase and about 1850, and after 1850. Native American natural history was extensive and had a distinctly spiritual character. Natural history was a component of European exploration up to the time of the Louisiana Purchase, but was not treated as a separate endeavor; the evidence from this period comes from the journals and diaries of early exploreres, fur traders and the like. Between the Louisiana Purchase and about 1850, natural history changed from its status ...


Charles Rueben Keyes And The History Of Iowa Archaeology, William Green Jan 1992

Charles Rueben Keyes And The History Of Iowa Archaeology, William Green

Journal of the Iowa Academy of Science: JIAS

Charles Reuben Keyes (1871-1951) achieved recognition during his lifetime as the "founding father" of Iowa archaeology, and later assessments confirmed and reemphasized Keyes' stature as Iowa's pioneer archaeologist. The collections and documents Keyes compiled, his interpretive publications, and the records of field work he coordinated have proven more valuable to Midwest and Plains archaeology every year. This article emphasizes Keyes' involvement in the development of professionalism in American archaeology and Iowa’s position in the growth of the discipline from 1920 to 1950. Keyes' contacts with the principal archaeologists of his era ensured Iowa’s involvement in the development ...


Rp92-445 Marketing Crafts And Other Products To Tourists, Sherri Gahring, Shirley Niemeyer, Rae Reilly, Janeann Stout Jan 1992

Rp92-445 Marketing Crafts And Other Products To Tourists, Sherri Gahring, Shirley Niemeyer, Rae Reilly, Janeann Stout

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

The travel and tourism industry is the third largest employer in the United States, supporting over 5.85 million travel-related jobs. Foreign and domestic visitors traveling in the United States generate over $327 billion in tourism revenues in a year, making travel and tourism the third largest retail sales industry.

If you target the tourist market, what types of products appeal to people who take part in different tourist activities? Are handcrafted items of interest to tourists? How can you improve existing marketing strategies?

To find answers to these questions, a research team from Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska gathered information ...