Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences

1992

Control

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Education

G92-1106 Controlling Rats, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas R. Virchow Jan 1992

G92-1106 Controlling Rats, Scott E. Hygnstrom, Dallas R. Virchow

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Ways to recognize rat problems and control rats are covered here.

The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) (also known as the common brown rat) is a destructive pest. Found in and around towns and farms throughout Nebraska, these rodents eat and contaminate large amounts of feed, damage structures by their gnawing and burrowing, and spread diseases that affect livestock and humans.


G92-1097 Root And Crown Rot: Winterkill Complex Of Winter Wheat, John E. Watkins, Ben Doupnik, Jr., Eric D. Kerr, Robert N. Klein Jan 1992

G92-1097 Root And Crown Rot: Winterkill Complex Of Winter Wheat, John E. Watkins, Ben Doupnik, Jr., Eric D. Kerr, Robert N. Klein

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Root and crown rot--winterkill complex is discussed, including nature of the complex, symptoms, control, and management rationale. Root and crown rot of winter wheat is an interrelated disease complex caused by the interaction of infection of roots and crowns by Bipolaris sorokiniana and/or Fusarium graminearum and harsh winter conditions. It is an insidious, persistent and inconspicuous disease complex that reduces wheat yields each year. In extreme cases, entire fields or large areas within fields are killed. The ultimate effect is loss of stands, poor plant vigor, reduced yield and lower grain quality.


G92-1100 Sugar Beet Nematode, Eric D. Kerr, F.A. Gray, G.D. Franc Jan 1992

G92-1100 Sugar Beet Nematode, Eric D. Kerr, F.A. Gray, G.D. Franc

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Symptoms, life cycle and control of sugar beet nematodes are among the topics covered here.

The sugar beet nematode, schachtii, is a major parasite of sugar beets, causing serious stand and yield reductions. It was first identified in 1859 on sugar beets near Halle, Germany. It was first observed in the United States as early as 1895 and was reported in two fields near Gering, Nebraska in 1926.


G92-1089 Control Of Pollurum And Typhoid Through Participation In The National And Nebraska Poultry Improvement Plans (Revised July 2002), Grasso M. Ebako, Del Wilmont Jan 1992

G92-1089 Control Of Pollurum And Typhoid Through Participation In The National And Nebraska Poultry Improvement Plans (Revised July 2002), Grasso M. Ebako, Del Wilmont

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Participation in the National Poultry Improvement Plan to prevent egg-transmitted diseases to small flocks, game birds, hobby, and exhibition flock owners is explained in this NebGuide.

The National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) is a cooperative state/federal program that was established in 1935 to reduce and eventually eliminate several diseases transmitted primarily through infected breeder flocks and theirs eggs. The plan's widespread acceptance among the commercial industry has almost completely eliminated Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum from commercial breeding stocks. Participation in the plan has saved the commercial industry and small flock owners millions of dollars due to improved ...


G92-1112 Lice Control On Cattle, John B. Campbell Jan 1992

G92-1112 Lice Control On Cattle, John B. Campbell

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Identifying and controlling lice on cattle both are covered here.

Cattle lice may be the most underestimated livestock insect in terms of economic losses. The USDA estimates that U.S. livestock producers lose $125 million a year to cattle lice.

Heavy louse populations cause lowered milk production, loss of flesh, stunted growth, general unthriftiness and anemia. "Chronic" or "carrier" cows may abort due to louse-induced anemia. During severe winters, louse-infested animals are more susceptible to respiratory diseases.